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Full text of "The highland churchman. [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C283 
H63 

v.17-18 
19U6-U7 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00042717480 



This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 




{M|tgJ)lant> 
Cnurcjtnan 




The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



APRIL, 1946 



NO. 1 




QJtjp f tgtjlanft 
(ttijurrijmatt 

Box 169 Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D.. Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. F. M. Tongue Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



Paganism 

We trust that all good Churchmen are 
using whatever influence they possess 
against the plan to remove wholesale the 
bodies of American boys who fell in 
action and who are most appropriately 
buried in beautiful spots near where 
they fought their last fight. 

War is too altogether horrible to have 
added to its suffering the unnecessary 
pain which will be inflicted upon the 
loved ones of these American sons who 
died far from home. No Christian be- 
lieves that there is any sanctity in the 
human corpse nor that its preservation 
in any particular spot has any connec- 
tion with the eternal welfare of the soul 
which once dwelt within it. Surely if 
these boys could be heard they would 
say that a far more fitting memorial to 
them would be the expenditure of the 
vast sum involved, in relieving the 
starving and the naked or for the fur- 
thering of movements to make war for- 
ever impossible. 

There is however a far more sinister 
side to this question. Slowly but surely 
the rights of the American people to de- 
cide their own destinies are being taken 



away by lobbyists and pressure groups. 
A writer in The Witness states fearlessly 
that this whole sad question would never 
have arisen were it not for a lobby of 
funeral directors in Washington. The 
Highland Churchman has no means 
of checking up on this statement. We 
merely assume that The Witness would 
not dare to print it if untrue. We do, 
however, call upon all decent funeral 
directors to come out and repudiate it, 
as something that should not be forced 
upon the American people, most of 
whom are unselfish and kindly and do 
not wish lavish expenditure on the dead 
as an alleviation of their sorrow. 



Passiontide 

The solemn character of the last two 
weeks of Lent is attuned to the times 
in which we live. It is significant that 
three great Passiontide hymns "The 
Royal Banners Forward Go", "Sing my 
Tongue the Glorious Battle", and "See 
the Destined Day Arise" were all writ- 
ten by Venantius Fortunatus who lived 
in the tumultous sixth century when the 
world had not recovered from the down- 
fall of the Roman Empire and much of 
Christendom was in anarchy and con- 
fusion. 

As the days increase since the actual 
tiring ended we grow discouraged and 
appalled at the failure of the world to 
right itself, at the drawing apart of the 
recent Allies, at chaos and confusion 
everywhere. If the picture of the world 
today, crying out for Christ's solution 
of its ills, does not move men's hearts, 
then we ask, "What will?" For Geth- 
semane and Calvary are being re-enact- 
ed before our eyes. 



OUR COVER 

The Christus Rex on our cover is 
reproduced through the courtesy of 
Ammidon and Company. It is a pic- 
ture of an already famous figure of 
Christ the King done by the renown- 
ed scuptor, Emmanuel Hahn, for the 
Collegiate Church of St. John the 
Evangelist, Bracebride, Ontario, Can- 
ada. 



For Our Safe Return 

By the Rev. Peter Lambert 

If mankind is driven in each generation to seek for the answers of life some- 
where outside of his own experience the individual Christian need not be unduly 
dismayed that out of "man's extremity comes God's opportunity." Because we 
have largely relegated the omnipotence of God to a sphere beyond our concern — 
that power which Christ wielded in His humanity to accomplish his "mighty 
resurrection" which we commemorate at each celebration of the Holy Communion, 
— we are too close to despair in this age in which we may be thrust close to the 
brink of anihilation by means of atomic power, as we conceive of it. Our question 
is "what shall save us from our own weapons?" Theologically, we have a vague 
notion of what Salvation means, and that likely is a popularized, distorted con- 
ception. In its root meaning it can mean simply "a safe return." If we could 
substitute this phrase in the Nicene Creed we might more readily understand the 
reason for our Lord's coming to earth, . . . for our "safe return" He was incarnate 
by the Holy Ghost . . . (the Love proceeding from the Father and Son) suffered 
. . . rose again; and ascended into heaven. It may seem all too simple an answer 
for our complex age of anxiety. Still it is the "safe return" that we all desire, 
whether we phrase it as such or not. 

Our concern "to save our own skin" may well drive us to seek refuge in spiritual 
power because in our atomic insecurity the "Security Council" of the United 
Nations Organization does not fill us with much confidence or hope. How many of 
our inner conflicts contribute to the social and political disorders we cannot be 
certain. It would take a whole new moral vocabulary to deliver men of their 
nominal fears and aches — And yet would the real creative struggle of man to know 
his meaning in the universe begin to explain his personal spiritual relation to God? 
It is an age-old story to the Church which has seen civilization rise and decline 
while the eternal message of the Good News of the power of our Lord's "mighty 
resurrection" is ever immediately applicable to the whole race as well as to the 
individual soul. God in Christ has not kept Himself concealed from us and by 
the same means as the saints have made their safe return can we confidently realize 
with St. Paul that the world is saved by hope. 

If it is power that is to captivate and influence our thought and activity for a 
phase of our civilization and how to avoid the "uncanny storms and the silences" 
of anihilation, certainly the Power that created and sustains the world which we 
may hold all unknowingly for an instant in our hand at the altar rail might the 
more repell us. The power of God as revealed on Sinai and as revealed on Calvary 
stand in contrast until we realize that in the power of His "mighty resurrection" 
we can go forth "in lowly strength and yet in conquering might" undaunted by 
the fears that harass the atomic or any other age. 



4k 

N- S 



Kanuga Schedule 
Announced 

The Retreat for Women will open the 
summer conference season at Kanuga 
Lake, conference center of the Episcopal 
Church near Hendersonville. The re- 
treat will be held June 3-6 under the 
direction of the Rt. Rev. Albert S. 
Thomas, D. D., retired bishop of South 
Carolina. It will be followed by the 
convention of the Woman's Auxiliary of 
Western North Carolina, June 6-7. 

The Laymen's Conference will follow 
immediately June 7-10. At the end of 
this conference the camp season will 
begin with the Midget Camp, for girls, 
June 15-28, under the direction of Mrs. 
Burchill R. Moore, and the Cub Camp 
for boys, June 29-July 12, directed by 
Burchill R. Moore, Charleston, S. C. 

The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, 
D. D., bishop of Western North Caro- 
lina, will be a member of the Adult Con- 
ference faculty. The Adult, Clergy, and 
College Conference will meet July 13-27. 
The first two groups will be under the 
general direction of the Rt. Rev. John 
L. Jackson, D. D., bishop of Louisiana, 
and the clergy school will be directed 
by the Rev. B. Duvall Chambers, Col- 
umbia, South Carolina. 

The Junior Conference for boys and 
girls 12-14 years of age will be held 
June 15-28 under the direction of the 
Rev. R. Emmet Gribbin, Jr., Chapel 
Hill. 

The Rev. John A. Pinckney, Clemson, 
South Carolina, and supervisor of Kan- 
uga, will be in charge of the Young 
People's Conference which meets June 
29-July 12. 

The Provincial Youth Convention will 
meet at Kanuga Lake July 27-August 3. 
It will be under the direction of the Rev. 
Girault Jones, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
and will be attended by the leaders of 
the youth of the Province of Sewanee. 

At the close of the conference period, 
the guest season will begin. The dates 
for the guest season are July 28-August 
31. In connection with the guest period, 
the Kanuga Boys Camp is operated at 
the camp site by Burchill R. Moore. 



At the recent annual meeting of the 
Council of Southern Mountain Workers 
in Knoxville, Tennessee, the Rev. A. 
Rufus Morgan of Franklin, N. C, was 
elected a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee for a term of three years. 



SOUTHERN RURAL CHURCH LEAD- 
ERSHIP SCHOOL TO BE HELD 
AT VALLE CRUCIS 

Plans to hold a Southern Rural 
Church Leadership School at Valle 
Crucis from June 22 through August 2 
have been announced by the Rev. A. 
Rufus Morgan of Franklin, chairman 
of the department of missions and 
church extension of the diocese of West- 
ern North Carolina. 

Mr. Morgan said the Province of 
Sewanee, which is composed of dioceses 
in the southeastern states, also will hold 
its Annual Rural Clergy Conference at 
Valle Crucis from July 29 through Aug- 
ust 9. Plans for the school were com- 
pleted at the Episcopal session of the 
Southern Mountain Workers' confer- 
ence at St. John's church, Knoxville, 
Tenn., on March 7 and 8. 

Mr. Morgan will be director of the 
school, which is sponsored by the Pro- 
vince, the diocese of Western North 
Carolina and the National Council of 
the Episcopal Church as well as the 
Episcopal Mountain Workers' confer- 
ence. 

The staff will include Professor Ralph 
Felton of Drew University, Miss Maude 
Cutler, director of religious education 
of the diocese of Southern Virginia, the 
Rev. C. L. Samuelson, associate secre- 
tary of the division of domestic missions 
of the National Council, the Rev. Wil- 
bur C. Leach of Valle Crucis and others 
to be selected. 

The schedule of the school included 
a week of orientation, four weeks of 
actual work in the field under expert 
supervision and a week of evaluation. 

It is expected that among the students 
there will be returned chaplains, theo- 
logical students and women church 
workers. 



Dr. Wetmore at Lincolnton 

By Father Sill 



(Continued fr 

The following excerpt is from the 
resolutions of the vestry after the death 
of their beloved pastor, "we desire to 
bear witness that in the forty-two years 
of his pastorate he never slighted his 
work or failed in his duty. The work 
he gave himself to do was more than 
ordinarily falls to the lot of two men, 
but he did it. The standard of duty 
that he held was high but he lived up 
to it, and his whole life was a spotless 
example of purity and unselfishness." 

Dr. Wetmore's work for many years 
after coming to St. Luke's included 
teaching in Lincolnton Male Academy, 
conducted by himself and Prof. H. H. 
Smith. He was expert as a mathemati- 
cian, and could read Latin and Greek 
as fluently as English, and being a prac- 
tical teacher he would take his students 
into the fields for lessons in surveying. 
According to W. L. Sherrill in "Annals 
of Lincoln County", Dr. Wetmore had 
a notable influence over many boys who 
attended this school. "He was a dis- 
ciplinarian, who ruled by kindness, 
rarely by coercion". He was of a rugged 
nature, and could walk many miles, as 
he did at times when going to and fro 
in taking services at Mission Churches. 
He also rode horseback. He walked 
from Cherryville one Monday morning, 
ten miles, in time for school opening at 
9:00 o'clock. Carrying his ministry to 
fields outside of Lincolnton; Dr. Wet- 
more established Missions and built 
churches, St. Paul's, three miles from 
town, Our Saviour, one miles, these in 
farming sections, St. Stephen's, among 
factory people, and St. Cyprian, for the 
colored people. I ministered and preach- 
ed at the Church of Our Saviour after- 
noon of February 3rd, this year, and can 
testify to its continued usefulness. Then 
further a-field our Missionary Rector 
held services at St. Mark's, Gastonia, 
starting the work there; St. John's, High 
Shoals, The Redeemer, Shelby, at Cher- 
ryville, and other places. 



om Last Issue) 

The work of the Church was central 
in the fulfillment of Dr. Wetmore's min- 
istry. The whole round of the Christian 
year, including its saints-days and fast 
days, was observed. "The Lord's own 
Service, the Holy Communion, always 
held its rightful position of primacy at 
St. Luke's thruout the years that Dr. 
Wetmore served the parish as priest", 
as one who knew, has written. Baptisms 
were always administered at a public 
service. The church was always open 
thruout the day. There were eucharis- 
tic lights and the eucharistic vestments 
were worn. Manuals of Devotion were 
given to communicants as aids to pray- 
er. Dr. Wetmore was a true pastor of 
souls. He established the Sunrise Easter 
Service in 1865, continued to this day, 
"the whole town joining in the proces- 
sion, preceded by crucifer." A most 
joyful occasion for him was the conse- 
cration in 1886 of the new St. Luke's, 
the tower and spire of the old structure 
being retained. 

Among those influenced by him to 
enter the ministry are the Reverends 
B. M. Lackey, and N. C. Duncan, of 
our Diocese. 

Dr. Wetmore and the Reverend 
James A. Weston, of Hickory, wrote a 
valuable historical sketch of the Church 
in the part of North Carolina that form- 
ed the Missionary Jurisdiction of Ashe- 
ville, this being done by a resolution 
offered at the first convention of the 
Jurisdiction. 



WHITE HOUSE OBSERVING LENT 

The White House took its mail from 
Church people so seriously that Mrs. 
Truman closed the White House social 
season on March 6th to observe Lent. 
The First Lady, an Episcopalian, will 
give no official parties during Lent. 



Be what you want other people to 
be — but be it first! 



5 



Question Box 

By the Rev. J. P. Burke 



How does General Convention func- 
tion and what are some of the issue to 
be considered at the meeting in Phila- 
delphia? 

General Convention, like all large 
legislative bodies, functions almost en- 
tirely through departments, committees, 
and commissions. A Joint Committee 
is one composed of members of the two 
Houses of General Convention. A Joint 
Commission includes not only members 
of the two Houses but members chosen 
at large. Either the House of Bishops 
or the House of Deputies may originate 
or propose legislation, but, all acts of 
the Convention must be adopted and 
authenticated by both Houses. Free- 
dom of debate is allowed in all delib- 
erations. 

Exactly forty Joint Committees and 
Commissions are expected to report to 
the Convention in Philadelphia. Their 
titles run from A to U;, from Architec- 
ture to Unity. Doubtless, the reports 
of the Commissions on Holy Matri- 
mony and Approaches to Unity will 
arouse the widest attention and con- 
cern. This does not imply, however, 
that the other reports are not important. 
Other outstanding commission reports 
will be those on Army and Navy, Place- 
ment of Clergy, Social Insurance for 
Lay Employees. There are two impor- 
tant Joint Committee reports on the 
Presiding Bishop: one concerning his 
Status and Work; one concerning the 
Matter of a See. Of course, the con- 
vention will have to give serious thought 
and probably much discussion to such 
matters as world conditions, peace and 
war, reconstruction and advance. 

Note that the commission on unity is 
called the Commission on Approaches 
to Unity. At Cleveland the Commis- 
sion reported not only on the approach 
to the Presbyterians, but also on rela- 
tions of the Commission with the Metho- 
dist Church and the Reformed Episco- 
pal Church. In both the Minority and 



Majority reports of the Commission, 
however, resolutions were introduced to 
the effect that no commitments looking 
toward organic unity should be made 
until they had been submitted to the 
Lambeth Conference. It is not likely, 
therefore, that any definite commitment 
will be made at the coming Convention. 



CLAIR LEAVES TRYON 

The Rev. J. R. Clair has resigned as 
rector of the Church of the Holy Cross, 
Tryon, effective March 31. After a 
rectorate of exactly three years here, 
Mr. Clair has accepted a call to become 
rector of Emmanuel Church, Corry, 
Pennsylvania, in the Diocese of Erie. 

Mr. Clair was rector of St. Mark's 
Church, Syracuse, for twelve years be- 
fore coming to the diocese. Previously, 
he was rector of All Saints', Williams- 
port, Pa., for nearly four years. 

Originally from Camden, New Jersey, 
Mr. Clair attended Drexel Institute, in 
Philadelphia, the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the Philadelphia Divinity 
School, where he was graduated cum 
laude. 

In 1945, Holy Cross Church raised 
more than $16,000 for a new organ. For 
the Reconstruction and Advance Fund, 
$2,200 has been raised under Mr. Clair's 
leadership. 



WASHINGTON CATHEDRAL 
HONORS STATE 

The Washington Cathedral honored 
North Carolina, the twelfth state to en- 
ter the Union, at the 11 o'clock service 
Sunday, March 24. The State flag was 
carried in procession, and special pray- 
ers were offered for the Governor and 
people of the state. 

Each week the Cathedral honors one 
of the 48 states at its Sunday service. 
North Carolina, as the 12th state, be- 
comes the twelfth thus to be honored 
in 1946. 



A good thing to remember, 

And a better thing to do. 

Is to work with the Construction Gang, 

And not the Wrecking Crew. 



Women's Auxiliary 

News 



The Executive Board of the Woman's 
Auxiliary met at St. Francis' Church, 
Rutherfordton, Tuesday, March 12, 
with 18 members present. Plans were 
completed for the Spring District meet- 
ings, and also for the annual meeting at 
Lake Kanuga, June 6th and 7th. The 
Spring District meeting will be held the 
first week in April. The dates and 
places of meeting are as follows: First 
District — Highlands, on April 5th; Sec- 
ond District — Brevard, April 4th; Third 
District — Lenoir, April 2; Fourth Dis- 
trict — Gastonia, April 3rd; Fifth Dis- 
trict — Franklin, April 7th. Mrs. W. A. 
Gordon of Spray, North Carolina, will 
be the inspirational speaker at all of 
the meetings. 

The two principal speakers at the 
Annual Meeting at Kanuga in June will 
be Mrs. Francis Clarkson, of Charlotte, 
N. C, who will speak on June 6th in the 
evening, on the subject of "The Fed- 
eral Council of Churches", and Miss 
Edna B. Beardsley, from the National 
Council in New York, one of the Auxil- 
iary's National officers. She will speak 
on "The United Thank Offering" on the 
morning of June 7. 

The offering taken at each of the dis- 
trict meetings will be given to the Bishop 
Payne Divinity School. 



ST. MARY'S RECEIVES GIFT 

The St. Mary's Centennial Fund has 
received a gift of $40,000 from Roger 
Gant, a member of the Church of the 
Holy Cross, Burlington, N. C, Bishop 
Edwin A. Penick, Chairman of the 
Board of Trustees, has announced. This 
gift is larger than any other single gift 
so far contributed to the Centennial 
Fund of St. Mary's. 



MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM PLANNED 
FOR CHRIST SCHOOL 

Final plans are being made for the 
construction of a memorial gymnasium 
for Christ School at Arden. After much 
delay, caused by the urgency of vital 
war work, Mr. Earl Stilwell, who has 
done all of the architectural work for 
the other buildings on the campus, is 
proceeding with this work for Christ 
School. The new building is to be locat- 
ed about where the work shop is now 
situated. Since this will require the re- 
moval of the shop and laundry, pro- 
vision will be made to house them in a 
section of the basement floor. 

"The Christ School News" devoted its 
March issue to a tribute to the founder, 
the Reverend Thomas C. Wetmore; the 
leader, the Reverend Reuben R. Harris; 
and the builder, Mr. David Page Harris. 
"Mr. Dave" has now been connected 
with Christ School for 25 years, 13 of 
which have been spent as Headmaster. 
During his time, Mr. Dave has achieved 
a number of improvements on the cam- 
pus and has been honored with the 
Chairmanship of many committees per- 
taining to the operation of the School. 

Following is a quotation from the 
Christ School News: 

"Three great men have influenced and 
shaped the destiny of Christ School: 
The Reverend Thomas Wetmore, Fath- 
er Reuben R. Harris, and Mr. Dave P. 
Harris. Each man's personality and 
character was typical of the three phases 
through which Christ School has passed. 
Father W'etmore founded the school; 
Father Harris established the religious 
element so prevalent in the school today 
as well as established a firm foundation; 
Mr. Harris has built the school, and 
shaped it into a modern, well respected 
school." 



Making a living doesn't always mean 
making a life. 



Samuel FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



Young Churchmen 



PROVINCIAL YOUNG CHURCHMEN 
MEET 

On Friday, February 9, representa- 
tives of the Young Churchmen in the 
Province of Sewanee met in Atlanta, 
Georgia. Miss Helen Thomas, of Gas- 
tonia, represented Western North Caro- 
lina. The meeting was held to plan the 
summer meeting at Lake Kanuga and 
to formulate plans for the National 
Council meeting. Reports were given 
from each Diocese. A banquet was held 
at St. Paul's Church, Atlanta, for the 
delegates on Saturday evening, and a 
corporate communion was held Sunday 
morning before adjournment. 



YOUTH GROUP AT BESSEMER CITY 

On the fourth Sunday in November, 
Miss Helen Thomas, president of the 
Young Churchmen of Western North 
Carolina, addressed the congregation at 
Bessemer City on the purpose of youth 
work. Following, the young people met 
with her to hear about the formation 
of a youth group. The next Sunday 
Miss Thomas met again with the young 
people, at which time a young people's 
group was formally organized. Those 
elected were Miss Levonne Carpenter 
as president, Mr. Bill Harmon as vice- 
president, and Miss Willodene Hook as 
secretary and treasurer. On the second 
Sunday in December the first meeting 
was held with 14 young people present. 
Regular meetings are being held the 
second Sunday of each month. The 
counselor is Mrs. Houston Godfrey. 



DISTRICT YOUTH MEETING AT 
PATTERSON 

Young people from District 4 of the 
Young Churchmen met on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 17, at Patterson School. Miss 
Betsy Barber, president of the District, 
presided. Miss Rebekah Moose opened 
the meeting with scripture and prayer. 



The Rev. Grant Folmsbee gave a talk 
on his early career in the church, and 
Capt. Estabrook spoke on the work of 
the Church's Army. At the business 
session, Miss Helen Thomas spoke on 
the Patterson School fund, and told of 
the work being done in her district. 

About 100 young people from Boone, 
Patterson School, Valle Crucis, Lenoir, 
Wilkesboro, attended. Each group re- 
ported on its activities, and the follow- 
ing district officers were elected: Chair- 
man, Miss Betsy Barber, Wilkesboro; 
secretary, Miss Mary Lou Zook, Lenoir; 
counselor, Mrs. G. K. Moon, Boone. 

After the meeting, a delightful supper 
was served by the Patterson School. 



The United Youth offering, taken by 
the Young Churchmen of the whole 
church last October, amounted to $11,- 
880 up to the end of January, according 
to the National Council. 



A LETTER FROM YOUR PRESIDENT 

Dear Young People: 

I hope by now all of you have heard 
about the new Chapel that is being built 
at Patterson School. Since Patterson is 
now our official Diocesan Camp, and we 
plan to go there every year, it is only 
right that we contribute toward the 
Chapel. Your District Chairmen have 
already been notified, and it is hoped 
that they have told each of you about 
this. Please try to raise all you can 
toward the offering, and send it to your 
district chairman, who will send it to 
me, or send it direct to me yourself. 
This offering will be presented to Pat- 
terson School at a special ceremony at 
the Camp this summer. 

You will be happy to learn that the 
Camp will be held the week of June 9th. 
Please make your reservations as early 
as possible. Registration blanks will 
be found elsewhere in this paper. 

Don't forget the nationwide Corpor 
ate Communion of Youth on May 19! 

Sincerely yours, 

Helen Thomas. 



NEW AGRICULTURAL-VOCATIONAL 

BUILDING PLANNED FOR 

PATTERSON SCHOOL 

Mr. George F. Wiese, superintendent 
of Patterson School, has announced 
plans for the construction of an Agricul- 
tural-Vocational building to be added 
as soon as possible to the campus of 
Patterson School. It is to be dedicated 
to God for the teaching of Agricultural 
and Vocational training and industrial 
arts. The inadequacy of the present 
school building, along with the increase 
in the student body and plans for fur- 
ther growth, make the need for this 
building urgent. Mr. Samuel L. Patter- 
son, founder of the school and North 
Carolina's first elected Commissioner of 
Agriculture, saw the importance of an 
agricultural and vocational school, and 
gave his 1,300 acre estate for that pur- 
pose. 

Plans have been drawn for the pro- 
posed building, which is to contain an 
industrial arts shop for wood and metal 
work, mechanical drawing room, agri- 
culture and science library, and class 
rooms. It is to be constructed of rock 
veneer on tile walls. The estimated 
cost, according to Mr. Wiese is $60,000. 

This building is in addition to the 
new Chapel, plans for which are al- 
ready well under way. 

Mr. Wiese stated that he is depending 



upon the prayers and contributions of 
Church people in the Diocese in these 
important and worthwhile projects, so 
that Patterson School may better de- 
velop our young people into Christian 
citizens and leaders. 



CALVARY PLANS NEW PARISH 
HOUSE 

Calvary Church, Fletcher, recently 
received from one of its members a gift 
of one thousand dollars as a memorial 
to a member of the donor's family. This 
money is to be used to start a fund to 
build a new parish house, which is very 
much needed. Other activities are being 
planned to raise further funds, and it 
is hoped that this improvement in the 
property will be under construction in 
the near future. 

The rector of Calvary Church, the 
Rev. Mark Jenkins, conducted a six- 
day mission the first week in Lent at 
Fassifern School for Girls at Henderson- 
ville. The subject of his sermons was 
"An Individual Soul Searching for 
God". Personal counselling, and dis- 
cussion after each session made the 
week's mission of great help to all. Stu- 
dents and faculty have since shown their 
appreciation and interest by hiring a bus 
to attend in a body the eleven o'clock 
service at Calvary. 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL — JUNE 9-15, 1946 

Name Age 

Address 

Parish or Mission 

Signature of Parent or Guardian 

I certify that the applicant is a member of the Episcopal Church, and that I 
recommend him/her to the Diocesan Camp. 

(Rector or Priest) 
Cut out this application, and mail to the Rev. C. G. Leavell, 401 S. King St., 
Morganton, N. C, together with $1.00 registration fee. 

9 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, A. M., President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

10th, 11th, 12th grades of High School and 
two years college work. All academic courses 
fully accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

For Catalogue and Book of Views write 

E. F. Stoughton, Business Manager 



riM*te™h 



HOVS 



Intermediate School: Seventh to Ninth 
Grades. Upper School : College En- 
trance Requirements. Sailing and other 
Salt-water Sports on the Rappahan- 
nock River. 

Apply to The Rev. S. Janney Hutton, 

Headmaster, Christchurch School, 

Christchurch, Va. 



MEMORIAL WINDOWS 

-By- 

HIGH POINT GLASS & 

DECORATIVE CO. 

A. W. Klemme, Pres., Mgr. 
High Point North Carolina 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St.. Asheville 
CALL 2105 



WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 
COLLECTION AT U.N.C. 

The University of North Carolina 
library reports that through the kind- 
ness of Bishop Robert E. Gribbin, the 
Episcopal Church has deposited in its 
library a selection of materials to be 
known as the "Diocese of Western 
North Carolina Collection". Among 
items of great interest there are sever- 
al books which once belonged to Bishop 
Thomas Atkinson. As might have been 
expected, many treasures came to light 
as these books were examined, the 
library reports. One of the most not- 
able so far is Volume 3 of Thomas Say's 
"American Entymology. or Description 
of the Insects of North America", Phila- 
delphia, 1824. 

Volumes 1 and 2 of this set were al- 
ready in the library, but the third vol- 
ume was missing up to this time. Thom- 
as Say (1787-1834) has been called "the 
father of descriptive entomology in 
America". A Quaker, born in Philadel- 
phia, his works are beautifully illustrat- 
ed by his own skillful and artistic hands. 
In this edition the illustrations are ex- 
quisitely engraved and tinted, and show 
the insects in almost microscopic detail. 

CHURCH SERVICES 

WOODS'DE: Our Savior, School, 2:15, 
Service 3 Every Sunday. Communion, 
2nd Sunday, 10. Wednesday Bible 
Study, 7 P. M. Rev. Grant Folmsbee. 

BLACK MOUNTAIN: St. James' Church, 
Rev. J. H. Rhys. Church School 10:15 
A. M. Services 2nd and 4th Sunday at 
7:30 A. M. Every Sunday at 11:15 A. M. 



LLOYD WALL PAPERS 

Will enable you to personalize your 
rooms at a minimum of cost. Tell us 
your needs. We will mail samples. 

W. H. S. LLOYD CO. INC. 

48 West 48 St. New York. 19 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



10 



QUESTIONS 

By the Rev. Mark Jenkins 

I can not say how widely practiced 
is the custom of answering, from the 
pulpit, questions asked by people the 
Clergyman contacts in his daily rounds 
in his parish and community. I 
do know that non-Episcopalians have 
many questions about the Episcopal 
Church, its ministry, teachings, worship 
and discipline. I also know that church 
members, some life-long, others of more 
recent membership, have innumerable 
unanswered questions about their 
Church and its teachings. They expect, 
and rightly so, that their Minister, 
trained for years in all these things, can 
and will answer such questions. Most 
of the clergy are eager and happy indeed 
to do this. But the opportunities for 
asking or receiving answers to questions 
is so limited in this age of hurry and 
haste. The old hour-long sermon for 
detailed instruction is a thing of the past 
(did I hear you say, thank goodness.'). 
Pastoral calls are short and usually con- 
tact a very small percentage of the fami- 
ly group per visit. Meetings at other 
times between parson and layman are 
hasty affairs and not conducive to ques- 
tioning or satisfactory answering. 

There are other proofs, besides my 
own experience, that questions need to 
be asked, and reasonable answers arc 
expected. Many books and pamphlets 
of questions and answers are being pub- 
lished today and are popular sellers. 
Magazines, including our own Church 
papers, run columns of questions and 
answers. All these efforts are based on 
the fact that people want to know 
things, and right answers should be giv- 
en to these inquiries, answers that will 
lead not to careless thinking, but, rather, 
lead the questioner on to further know- 
ledge and study. 

Some six or eight times per year for 
the past fifteen years I have, at an- 
nouncement time in public services, ask- 
ed anyone having a question to write it 
on a piece of paper and give it to me, 
or put it in the mail, or else wait a 



moment after the service and ask per- 
sonally for the information sought. 
Some twenty to fifty questions have 
been asked per year and when these arc 
combined and edited there are enough 
to use up to four or five sermon periods 
for answering. This method of instruc- 
tion brings wanted information at the 
time it is most wanted, instead of wait- 
ing to get it years hence by way of a 
sermon. But why wait? Ask now 
about those things that will help you 
grow in knowledge and Christian living. 




TFk Rrtterson School 
'"Boys. 



Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. r /iese, Supt . 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



We Announce the Receipt of 

TWO NEW BOOKS 

The Revised New Testament 

$2.00 

and 

The Trinity and Christian Devotion 

By Charles W. Lowry 

Price $1.50 

Brown Book Co. 

12-14 College St., Asheville 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 

DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



11 



Mrs. #. W. Thomas 
69 Charlotte St„ 
Ajkevllle, U. G. 



t 


UNITED 


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RECONSTRUCTION AND 
ADVANCE FUND 

Early and incomplete reports on the 
Reconstruction and Advance Fund in 
Western North Carolina indicate that 
the church people of this Diocese are 
determined that the Church shall do its 
share toward building a better world 
following the war. Wherever the con- 
gregations have been told the story and 
given an opportunity to participate, they 
have responded generously to the call 
upon them to help our Church meet its 
opportunities in the reconstruction of 
the work of the Church in war-torn 
countries, and advancing its work 
throughout the world. 

Mr. W. H. Stewart, Diocesan Chair- 
man, announced that the total of special 
gifts thus far received is $13,751.00. 
Only nine parishes and missions have 



reported on the general collection with a 
total of $1,230.00. 

It is hoped that reports on the gen- 
eral collection will be made to the Treas- 
urer of the Diocese, Mr. William Red- 
wood, as soon as possible. 



ROY H. McDUFFIE Jr. 

Specializing in 

* Estate Tax Analysis 

* Business Insurance 

* Retirement Income 

* Endowments 

401-2-3 Public Service Bldg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Phone 7167-7168 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 






{EMtgljlanfci 
Cljttrcjtnan 




The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



MAY, 1946 



YOUTH ISSUE 



NO. 2 




A View of the Campus of Patterson School. 



(Etfurrijman 

Box 169 Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. F. M. Tongue Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



General Convention 
Year 

General Convention unfortunately 
has a way of backing up into the placid 
pools of diocesan life and muddying the 
waters. 

This is a General Convention year. 
To be forewarned is to be forearmed. 
There are, as always, some matters to 
come up in General Convention on 
which there is a very wide difference of 
opinion. A glorious opportunity there- 
fore arises for alarmists and prophets 
of doom to predict dire things, if Gen- 
eral Convention does not act as they 
think it should. 

So in regard to the election of deputies 
to General Convention. If we are in- 
formed as to the issues, we wish that 
they would vote this way or that way. 
Some dioceses are so short-sighted as to 
instruct their deputies how to vote. All 
'^such thinking misses the main issue 
which is this. Who are the four priests 
and four laymen in this diocese with the 
best minds who are well posted on what 
subjects will arise and who can be trust- 
ed to listen to and perhaps (although 



that is not so important) take part in 
the debates and then seek the guidance 
of the Holy Spirit before voting? Surely 
this is far more important than the 
reasons sometimes given for electing 
deputies — service to the diocese in other 
capacities, youth, age, the fact that he 
has "never been", or just that he is a 
good guy. 



Sharing 

To add our word to all that has been 
written regarding famine conditions in 
Europe would be superfluous, were it 
not that the beauty of unfolding Spring 
in Western North Carolina reminds us 
that we are a privileged people, who 
have the opportunity at first hand to 
know God in His Holiness and Beauty 
through the works of His hands. 

We as Christians would like to share 
this beauty with all men upon earth. 
However the times demand that we 
share something far more fundamental 
— our daily bread. Long before the war 
ended The Highland Churchman 
maintained that it was a far nobler form 
of self-denial to share food with the 
starving than even with our own sons 
on the firing-line. We hope that in so 
stressing we made some converts. At 
all events the practical thing for us to 
do is to lift up our voice in favor of the 
return of involuntary food rationing, 
for the picture of Americans growing 
fat while Europe and Asia starve is not 
a noble one. As Christians we should 
want a return to rationing, and we can 
have it if we demand it. What Congress- 
man could be re-elected if he refused to 
heed the wishes of his constituency in 
a matter as vital as this? 



Convention 

We appreciate the action of the 
Executive Council in restoring a two- 
day Diocesan Convention. We realize 
that this is a controversial matter and 
that there are some who feel that one 
day is sufficient. However here as in 
other matters we should not succumb 
to making normal what had to be en- 




May, 1946 



To the Young People of the Diocese of Western North Carolina: 

It is pleasing to me to be asked by the Young People to have a part 
in the Youth Issue. 

We learn by doing. The young people will learn a great deal in this 
important venture. Sometimes when we try to fulfill what is ordinarily 
another's responsibility, we have an added appreciation of what the other 
does for us. Getting out this one issue will help the young people to 
understand what the Editor of the Highland Churchman does so reg- 
ularly and so acceptably. 

I believe that the Diocese of Western North Carolina as a whole will 
approve, when all know about the needs, the project the young people 
have in securing funds for the erection of a Chapel at the Patterson School. 
I heartily commend the effort. 

So often the statement is heard, "The Youth of today is the Church 
of tomorrow." The Church is urged to work for youth so that the future 
of the Church will be guaranteed. It seems to me that the Church should 
strive to see that all of her members have the appropriate training and 
experience for whatever age they are. If a child grows up without learning 
certain things and acquiring skills more easily obtained then than later, 
he is handicapped for the rest of his life. If a wisdom tooth does not 
erupt at the proper time, it is apt to cause trouble later. The "teen-ager" 
needs the worship and work of the Church for his full development at that 
time of life, and for entering into the fullness of mature age. "More 
power to you !" 

Sincerely your friend, 
Robert E. Gribbin, Bishop. 



dured owing to war-time necessity — 
undoubtedly war time stringency taught 
us to curb some extravagances perman- 
ently, but it is not universally true that 
all economies and readjustments made 
in wartime should be maintained perm- 
anently. In fact many of us are dis- 
turbed because in several phases of life 
and activity people are assuming that 
what was cheerfully endured during the 



war can be offered people now, thus 
reducing the necessity for painstaking 
service. 

So without wishing to crow over the 
one-day Convention advocates, we wish 
to express our gratification that at All 
Souls on May 13 and 14 we can at least 
take time to be thorough and we hope 
time to be Holy. 



3 




Capers Named Rector 
At Tryon 

The Rev. William T. Capers, Jr., who 
has been rector pro tern of St. Michael's 
Church, Charleston, S. C, since 1943, 
has accepted the rectorship of the 
Church of the Holy Cross in Tryon, 
beginning June 9. 

Mr. Capers' father was Bishop of 
West Texas, while his grandfather was 
Bishop of South Carolina. He himself 
was born in Sumter, S. C, and was 
graduated from the Theological Semi- 
nary of Virginia in 1927. He was vicar 
of St. Paul's Church, San Antonio, 
Texas, from 1927 to 1929, rector of the 
Church of the Redeemer, Okmulgee, 
Okla., 1929-32; rector of St. Stephen's, 
Terre Haute, Ind., 1932-40, and rector 
of St. Bartholomew's, White Plains, 
N. Y., from 1940 until early 1942 when 
illness caused him to resign there. 

Mr. Capers' father was rector of 
Trinity Church, Asheville, from 1903-05. 



Annual Convention of 
Diocese Meets May 14-15 

The 24th annual convention of the 
Diocese will be held at All Souls Church, 
Biltmore, on Tuesday and Wednesday, 
May 14 and 15, it has been announced 
by Bishop Gribbin. 

The convention will open at 10:30 
a. m. on Tuesday. On Tuesday eve- 
ning, there will be a special service, at 
which the heads of the various Diocesan 
schools will speak. 



A good thing to remember, 

And a better thing to do, 

Is to work with the Construction Gang, 

And not the Wrecking Crew. 



DISTRICT IV MEETS 

A fine group attended the District 
Youth Rally at the Church of Our 
Savior, Woodside, on April 10. Twenty- 
two young people, two counselors, and 
two clergymen were present, from 
Gastonia, Bessemer City, Lincolnton, 
and Woodside. The program was opened 
with games and songs, followed by a 
report on youth work in the Province, 
and the offering for the Chapel at Pat- 
terson School by Miss Helen Thomas, 
Diocesan president of youth. The Rev. 
Grant Folmsbee talked on opportunities 
for young people to become missionar- 
ies, nurses, religious education workers, 
etc., and presented a review of materials 
for weekly meetings. The schedules 
for conferences at Kanuga and Patter- 
son School were discussed. After a 
picnic style supper in the Parish Hall, 
Mrs. Jack Ramseur, Lincolnton youth 
leader, spoke on the words of Jesus, 
"Come unto Me" and "Go into all the 
world". A candlelight ceremony was 
held at the conclusion of the service in 
the church. Candles were lighted from 
the large altar candle representing 
Christ, the Light of the World, by the 
leaders and counselors of youth, who in 
turn lighted the candles of all the young 
people present. All then repeated a 
pledge, "to let their lights shine to the 
glory of God". A special guest was the 
Rev. Oscar Randolph, D. D., from Alex- 
andria, Va. Mrs. Hubert Auton of 
Woodside was in charge of arrange- 
ments. 



DICTRICT III MEETS 

District III which consists of Tryon, 
Brevard, Upward, Edneyville, Bat Cave 
and Hendersonville, had a meeting at 
the Parish House in Hendersonville. 
The minutes of the last meeting was 
read by Ted Freeman, Secretary, and 
approved. The business of nominating 
and electing a new Adult Advisor was 
taken up first. Mrs. M. A. Hatch was 
elected. The next business was the 
Corporate Communion Service at 
Easter. The main business of the eve- 
ning was the contribution to Patterson 
School Chapel Fund. It was voted and 
passed that a party be held, and a com- 
mittee was drawn up to make the plans. 
Margie Major, Chairman; Mary Tur- 
ner, Co-chairman; Eileen Staton, Peggy 
Freeman, Denny Justus and Junior 
Pace. There were about thirty young 
people present although Brevard and 
Tryon was not represented. The Wo- 
man's Auxiliary served a buffet supper 
for the meeting after which group sing- 
ing took place. 



GRACE CHURCH, MORGANTON 

The Young People's Service League 
of Grace Church, Morganton, has been 
working to earn money for the Patter- 
son School Fund. On March 23rd they 
picked and sold daffodils. The money 
which they earned will go to this fund. 
Recently new officers and group leaders 
were elected. Fuller Chaffee was elec- 
ted president; Mary Aston Leavell, vice- 
president; Clara Kate Boggs, secretary; 
and Mary Murphy Boggs, leader of the 
younger group. 

In December the Junior Altar Guild 
dressed dolls and sold them at a bazaar 
held by the Women's Auxiliary. The 
$4.50 which they made will go to the 
Patterson School Fund also. 



PRESENTATION SERVICE AT 
CALVARY CHURCH 

The Presentation Service for the 
Lenten Offering of the Convocation of 
Asheville will be held at Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, on May 5, at 3 P. M. 



HENDERSONVILLE YOUNG PEOPLE 

The Young People of St. James have 
been having a study course as their 
Sunday night program. The material 
was used from what was sent by 
"281". Outside the regular meetings 
we have had a Feast of Lights pageant 
given the First Sunday in Epiphany. 
This was under the direction of the Rev. 
James P. Burke and Mrs. M. A. Hatch. 
All the young people took part in this 
pageant. The last few weeks have been 
busy ones at St. James' Parish House, 
the men of the church cleaning up the 
yard, the women sewing curtains and 
the young people washing windows and 
dusting. It was lots of fun and the 
Parish House now has sanded floors; 
two rooms have been recently added 
for the church school. Two new rugs 
have been donated for the newly sand- 
ed floors. 

Holy Week found practically all 
young people at each evening service 
and many sang in the choir. 

On Easter Morning every one rose 
bright and early so we could get up to 
Echo Inn by 6:30 a. m. to see the sun 
rise and hear the band play and High 
School Glee Club sing beautiful Easter 
Hymns. All the churches in town took 
part in the service and it was very 
inspiring. This is the first year all the 
churches have joined in this service. 

Plans have been made for a party 
to raise money for the Chapel at Pat- 
terson School. If the plans are carried 
out, we will have a grand time and 
make some money toward our goal. 
This money will be presented next 
month at Patterson School. 



Making a living doesn't always mean 
making a life. 



JOHN E. SCHLEY 

Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

General Insurance 
Asheville, N. C. 



ST. LUKE'S SUNRISE SERVICE 

By the Rev. Grant Folmsbee 
For the eighty-first Easter Day in suc- 
cession the people of this community — 
young and old alike — will unite again 
this year with the congregation of St. 
Luke's Church-in-Lincolnton in their 
annual Sunrise Service. Several memor- 
ial gifts* will be received and blessed at 
this service, to be held at 5:15 A. M. 
(*White burse and veil to match Euchar- 
istic Vestments; Supplies for the Altar 
for this year.) And in memory of all the 
faithful departed who during the last 
eighty-one years have marched in this 
procession on Easter Day, the Rector 
will wear an ancient Cope which has 
been entrusted temporarily to the 
custody of the Altar Guild. A Cope is 
a semi-circular vestment worn like a 
cloak at solemn functions, and in pro- 
cession. The one to be used at St. 
Luke's is of apricot silk damask, heavily 
embroidered with flowers, and lined 
with magenta silk. It was made in Italy 
nearly three hundred years ago and was 
brought to North America before the 
parish of St. Luke's was founded more 
than one hundred years ago. 

Adding to the solemnity of the pro- 
cession this year will be the processional 
candlesticks carried by servers on either 
side of the Cross, and given by a 
member of the congregation in memory 
of two heroes who gave their lives in the 
recent war, Kirk McBee, U.S.N., who 
lost his life in the Pearl Harbor disaster, 
and Capt. Wilson Glover, Jr., of the 
Army Air Corps, who was taken prison- 
er at Bataan and was killed when the 
prison ship taking him from the Philip- 
pines to Japan was sunk. 

The first Sunrise Service in which the 
people of this community united before 
the Altar of St. Luke's Church was held 
on Easter Day 1865. In that year 
Easter came on April 16. President 
Lincoln lay dead in the White House. 
He had been assassinated on the eve- 
ning of the preceding Good Friday, and 
died at seven o'clock the following 
morning — Easter Eve. The service was 
inaugurated by the then Rector of St. 
Luke's, the Rev. William R. Wetmore, 




WM. M. REDWOOD RETIRES 

Mr. William Morris Redwood retired 
on April 1st as vice-president of the 
First National Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of Asheville. Born in King 
William county, Virginia, Mr. Redwood 
was one of the organizers of the bank 
in 1922. Mr. Redwood is a member 
of Trinity Church, where he has served 
for years as a member of the vestry. 
For the past 22 years he has served 
ably and faithfully as Treasurer of the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina. 

While he is retiring from active work 
as an officer of the bank, Mr. Redwood 
will continue to serve on its board of 
directors. After a vacation, he expects 
to follow a much more leisurely routine 
in looking after his remaining personal 
and business interests. 

D.D., and has been held every Easter 
since. Dr. Wetmore came to Lincolnton 
as Deacon-in-Charge in 1862, and was 
Rector from his ordination to the Priest- 
hood later that year until he died just 
before Easter in 1904. A cross erected 
to his memory by the congregation 
stands near the Church he served so 
long and so devotedly. 



Camp Forecast 

By Rev. C. G. Leavell, Director 



The Diocesan Youth Camp should be 
just as good this year as it was the 
last two years. We hope it may be a 
little better; it can and will be if we 
who are there at Patterson School make 
it so. The dates are, as indicated else- 
where, from Sunday June 9th, beginning 
about 5:00 P. M., to Saturday, June 
15th, after breakfast. 

Although I have heard of a number of 
old-timers who are planning to return 
this year, thus far we have received 
very few applications. Apparently no- 
body will take us seriously until within 
a few days of camp, at which time 
applications come pouring in, and many 
have to be turned away. One week 
after this issue of The Highland 
Churchman comes out we plan to open 
registrations to any young people, prop- 
erly certified by the nearest Episcopal 
clergyman, thirteen years of age and 
under twenty-five years of age. Up to 
that time we shall accept only the 
registrations of Episcopalians or bona 



fide members of young people's service 
leagues within the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina, 13 to 25 years of age. 
The cost this year is one dollar more 
than it has been the last two years, being 
raised from six to seven dollars, $1.00 
of which is the registration fee. This is 
still within the reach of most pocket- 
books these days. The age limit has 
been raised this year from twelve to 
thirteen. 

Amongst the staff already definitely 
lined up there is only one who is really 
new to Camp, Miss Virginia Howell, 
of Grace Church, Morganton, who will 
serve as counsellor to the girls along 
with Miss Patricia Page, soon-to-be 
graduate of Windham House, New York 
City, and Mrs. J. B. Craven, Jr., of 
Grace Church, Morganton, visitor to 
camp several times in 1944. We hope 
Miss Jane Turner, of St. James', Hen- 
dersonville, will also return. 

We are quite proud of the fact that 
Bishop Gribbin is to be back with us 
(Continued on Page 12) 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL — JUNE 9-15, 1946 

Name Age 

Address 

Church Affiliation 

Signature of Parent or Guardian 



I recommend the above applicant. He/she (is, is not) a member of my 

congregation. 

(Rector or Priest) 

Cut out this application, and mail to the Rev. C. G. Leavell, 401 S. King St., 
Morganton, N. C, together with $1.00 registration fee. 



National Youth 
Commission Reports 

The National Youth Commission an- 
nual session at Orleton Farms, Ohio, in 
February announced several outstand- 
ing plans for the year 1946-1947. Per- 
haps the most significant of these is the 
decision to allot the United Youth Offer- 
ing, to be received on Youth Sunday, 
October 20, to scholarship aid for Japa- 
nese young people preparing for Chris- 
tian work. This offering will enable 
some native Japanese young people to 
train for the ministry or for lay posi- 
tions in the Church. The number to be 
trained will depend upon the size of the 
offering. 

Another important step was the deci- 
sion to publish a booklet for personal 
use designed for all young people of the 
Church between the ages of 14 and 25 
who belong to various youth organiza- 
tions as well as for those who live in 
isolated areas. The booklet will be 
based on the Rule of Life and will be 
closely integrated with the year's pro- 
gram. 

In addition to the booklet for per- 
sonal use and the observance of Youth 
Sunday with the United Youth Offer- 
ing, the following "majors" are listed in 
the year's program: a study of Chris- 
tian Stewardship in November, the 
Feast of Lights during Epiphany, and a 
Nationwide Corporate Communion of 
young people in April. 

Elected to serve as 1946-1947 officers 
of the Commission were Miss Betty 
Street of Oxford, Ohio, Chairman, and 
Miss Priscilla Hannah of Pasadena, 
California, Secretary. 

The Commission made some of the 
preliminary arrangements for the Na- 
tional Youth Convention to be held in 
Philadelphia, September 14 and 15. This 
will coincide with the General Conven- 
tion. Each Diocese and Missionary 
District has been asked to send one 
adult and two young people as their 
delegates to the Youth Convention. 

The maroon and silver shield pin, the 



insignia of the Linked Movement of the 
Chruch's Youth, is again available. 
These pins may be secured from the 
Division of Youth, 281 Fourth Avenue, 
New York 10, N. Y., for 25 cents each 
in any quantity. Orders are already 
coming in from those who plan to dis- 
tribute these attractive pins at spring 
conventions and summer conferences. 



MOVIES FOR VALLE CRUCIS 

The Chapel of the Cross, Valle Crucis, 
has recently purchased a Slide Projector 
for use in religious instruction. They 
also have ordered a 16 mm. sound pro- 
jector. It is planned to have movies 
each Saturday night in the grammar 
school building in order to pay for the 
projector. The slide projector has al- 
ready been paid for through thank of- 
ferings. 

The Rev. Wilbur C. Leach said it is 
hoped that the projectors will be useful 
in entertaining the community and pre- 
senting educational topics as well as for 
religious instruction. In this way, the 
church may become a center for the 
community. 



MRS. A. P. MACK TAKEN BY DEATH 

Mrs. Albert P. Mack, wife of the 
Rev. Albert P. Mack, rector of St. John's 
Church, Marion, died Tuesday, April 
23, following a brief illness. 

Funeral services were held at St. 
John's on Friday, April 26. The Rev. 
David N. Peoples, of Bluffton, S. C, 
celebrated the Requiem, assisted by 
Brother Thomas. The Rev. Peter Lam- 
bert, of Penland, conducted the Burial 
Office, and Bishop Gribbin officiated at 
the grave. 

Mrs. Mack was a native of Leaven- 
worth, Kansas. In addition to her hus- 
band, she is survived by one son, Edwin 
Van Tuyl Mack, of Charlotte, and her 
mother, Mrs. Lou Van Tuyl, of Marion. 



Don't forget the nationwide Corporate 
Communion of Youth on May 19! 



The Spirit of Patterson School 



By George F. Wiese 



The spiritual life of the students 
seemed most outstanding this year. Or- 
dinarily it is thought of as the Spirit of 
the School because it is founded upon 
the inspiration gained in Chapel and the 
fellowship enjoyed in our every day life. 

The choir is to be congratulated upon 
its splendid service. I have been en- 
couraged by the response of the boys 
when called upon to help in the Recon- 
struction and Advance Fund offering. 
They certainly measured up. Daily vol- 
untary evening Family Prayers led by 
Sister Hetherington and others have 
proved successful. Sister Hetherington 
(of Church Army) also introduced the 
Order of Sir Galahad, which challenged 
the imagination of the boys and stimu- 
lated plenty of action. Six faithful serv- 
ers assisted Mr. Lackey at the Friday 
morning services of the Holy Com- 
munion as their week for chapel duty 
rolled around. 

Many minor improvements have been 
made in the past school year but the 
most outstanding are the laying of cem- 
ent sidewalks, building roads and clear- 
ing waste or idle lands for the campus. 
Old buildings are disappearing as new 
ones are being constructed. The black- 
smith shop, machine shop, and machine 
shed are well enough along for use, so 
we can say, "Well done, good and faith- 
ful servants" to the old outworn build- 
ings as we wreck them. 

Because of the work we have seen it 
do in leveling banks, removing trees and 
stumps, cutting roads, etc., we think of 
a bull-dozer as a powerful machine 
which makes the mountains stand aside 
or performs any other difficult task 
which can be done with tractor and a 
large blade controlled by a few levers. 
Mr. Hawkins thought out and made a 
bull-dozer for the small B Allis Chalm- 
ers farm tractor. Because of its size, we 
call it a calf-dozer. It is surely remark- 
able for the work it can do. 



For nine years we have worked to- 
ward an athletic field which is finally 
materializing. The field, which is 600 
feet long and 320 feet wide, is in perfect 
condition. We now can have a standard 
one quarter mile track, a football field, 
and a baseball diamond. The boys are 
doing very well in baseball. They closed 
the basketball season after winning nine 
games and losing four. 

Tree planting and thinning to permit 
proper development of forest trees on 
our property was done with much en- 
thusiasm. A recent demonstration on 
cutting pulp wood, the proper spacing 
of trees to be grown for timber and the 
use of tools, was given by Mr. Graiber, 
the North Carolina Extension Forester, 
assisted by the State Forester and Coun- 
ty Agent. 

Moving pictures were shown on sev- 
eral occasions by both Federal and 
State Foresters for the entire student 
body to organize Fire Fighting crews 
and to teach them the value of our for- 
ests. 

If you have not received the last Pat- 
terson School News, "Greater Camp 
Patterson" number, you should send for 
it. We are making every effort to es- 
tablish a permanent and adequate camp 
site for the Diocesan Youth Camp, 
Grange Camp, 4 H Club and other farm 
organizations. The Diocesan Young 
People's Camp this year will be from 
June 9 to 15; the State Grange Youth 
Camp from June 25 to 30. We are 
looking forward to two successful camp 
periods and to greater things when we 
can offer the added facilities planned. 
The camp of the future will depend upon 
you, just as our school depends upon its 
many friends who remember us in their 
prayers and giving. I have faith in God 
and you which assures me that all of us 
will do our part in establishing Camp 
Patterson for greater service to the 
youth of our Church and the rural 
South. 



ST. JOHN'S, UPWARD 

The Young People's League at St. 
John's Church, Upward, reorganized 
February 23. 

President, Dennis Justus; Vice Presi- 
dent, Guy Pace; Secretary, Sarah Jus- 
tus; Treasurer, Jeanette Anderson. 

We meet every Saturday night. After 
the devotionals we play games. Our 
study Program has been "The Meaning 
of Baptism" "What is the Church", 
"The Creed", "The Lord's Prayer" and 
study of "The Seven Deadly Sins". 

We are planning with St. James, 
Hendersonville, and Transfiguration, 
Bat Cave, to raise money for Patterson 
School. We are hoping that some will 
get to the Camp at Patterson School 
this summer. 



NEW WINDOWS AT FLETCHER 

Two stained glass windows have been 
ordered from the Henry Keck Studios 
in Syracuse, N. Y., for the Chancel of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, N. C. All 
the beautiful windows of the original 
Church were destroyed in the fire which 
razed the structure in 1935. When the 
church was rebuilt and dedicated in 
1938, only the large windows in the 
west end were replaced with stained 
glass. 

Recently two different persons came 
to the Rector, the Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
and each offered to give a window. The 
subjects of these windows are: "The 
Crucifixion" which will be placed on 
the Gospel side of the Altar, and "The 
Ressurrection" which will be placed on 
the Epistle side. The windows will be 
installed in the late summer. 



A splendid wine-red carpet has been 
placed in the chancel and sanctuary of 
the Church of Our Savior, Woodside, 
through the efforts of the newly organ- 
ized Women's Auxiliary of that mission. 
They have made vestments for the choir, 
which joined the choir of St. Luke's 
Church for the Sunrise Service on 
Easter Day. 



Question Box 

By the Rev. J. P. Burke 

Why does our Parish have to pay an 
assessment? How is the amount de- 
termined? 

Our Diocese is an Household of 
Parishes and Missions. The Assess- 
ment is a share of joint expenses. Each 
Parish and Mission, therefore, is ex- 
pected to share in the housekeeping 
expenses of the Diocese by paying an 
Assessment. You will find an analysis 
of the Diocesan Expense Fund on page 
60 of your last year's Journal. Some 
of the items are: Bishop's Office Ex- 
pense, and Travel, Provincial Assess- 
ment, Salary Diocesan Secretary, 
Treasurer's Office Expense, Printing of 
the Journal, expenses of Departments, 
and, some Clergy Travel Expense. 

The canon law of the Diocese requir- 
es it. Parishes and Missions which do 
not pay their Assessments in full "shall 
not be entitled to participate and vote 
by its (their) delegates in the proceed- 
ings of the Convention, except, "that 
upon favorable recommendation by the 
Department of Finance the Convention 
may seat delegates from such Parishes 
and Missions" . . . Failure to pay rea- 
sonable Assessments" is given as one 
cause for which a Parish may be sus- 
pended. 

Our canon law states that the Execu- 
tive Council is empowered to make 
these Assessments "according to the 
several abilities of the Parishes and 
Missions." The Finance Committee 
fixes the amounts, and, after they are 
approved by the Executive Council, 
your Parish is notified of its share. This 
share is largely determined by the 
amount your Parish is able to pay for 
its own housekeeping. 



BISHOP MATTHEWS AT 
HENDERSONVILLE 

Bishop Paul Matthews, retired, of 
Princeton, New Jersey, preached at St. 
James' Church, Hendersonville, on 
Good Friday for the Three Hour Ser- 
vice. Bishop Matthews has a summer 
home at Bat Cave. An excellent attend- 
ance was reported. 



10 



The Rev. Milnor Jones 



By Father Sill 



The Church in the western part of 
North Carolina continued to grow in 
some of our towns after Civil War days, 
and "Mission" congregations were es- 
tablished in some outlying places. This 
was during Bishop Atkinson's time (the 
third bishop of the diocese of N. C.) It 
was about the time that Bishop Syman, 
who had been assistant bishop, succeed- 
ed Bishop Atkinson (in 1881), that a 
missionary, an ordained deacon, one 
Milnor Jones, began to preach the Gos- 
pel in Polk County, unexplored as yet 
by the Episcopal Church. If anyone 
deserves the name of Evangelist, he 
surely does. After being trained for the 
ministry at the Sewanee Theological 
School, and ordained deacon in 1876 by 
Bishop Howe, of South Carolina, he 
gave himself to the preaching of the 
Gospel. As his father was in charge of 
the Church at Glenn Springs, S. C, he 
assisted him for two or three years, and 
then became rector of the Church of 
The Advent, Spartanburg, S. C, near- 
by, but only for a year or so. He con- 
tinued for a year and more longer, how- 
ever, to hold services and preach at 
places where he had begun to minister 
while rector of The Advent. This he 
did on week nights. Mr. Jones did not 
fit into the organized work of parish 
life. His forte was in gathering groups 
of people together, preaching to them 
the word of Salvation, and administer- 
ing baptism in the name of The Lord 
Jesus. He also brought many to receive 
confirmation, and started a number of 
Sunday Schools. 

So the need for the Gospel in Tryon 
and adjoining country called him over 
the South Carolina border. He began 
the work of what is now Holy Cross 
Parish, Tryon, building a Church there, 
and spread his labors on weekdays, as 
well as Sundays, over the countryside. 
Tryon, Mill's Spring, The Cross Roads, 
Huggin's School House, Riverside, 
Green River Cove, The Ridge, Weston's 
Saw Mill were regular preaching sta- 



tions. Occasionally, he preached else- 
where, as at "The Block House Distil- 
lery" and "The summit of Tryon Moun- 
tain". A log church was built at "The 
Cross Roads". These were days of 
horseback, buggy, and pole-teams, and 
we can imagine the roads. Later names 
were added to his reports to the Dioces- 
an Convention, Bat Cave, Whitesdies, 
Seagles, among others, which shows that 
he had gone far a-field. 

He labored in Polk and adjoining 
counties for eight years. It was at this 
time that Bishop Cheshire, of North 
Carolina, became acquainted with him. 
He was not yet a bishop, but the rector 
of St. Peter's Church, Charlotte, and 
made an official visit on Deacon Jones. 
Later, as Bishop, he placed him in 
charge of the Valle Crucis Mission with 
Watauga, Mitchell, and Asheville Coun- 
ty as a missionary field. The Valle 
Crucis Mission needed reviving. Mr. 
Jones pursued the same practices of his 
ministry as we have referred to, preach- 
ing week nights as well as Sundays 
throughout his field, wherever he could 
get a hearing, and baptizing and pre- 
paring some for confirmation. Bishop 
Cheshire made visitations in this field. 
He had high regard for his deacon and 
a love for him. It is from his remi- 
niscences of him, in pamphlet form, that 
I have gotten most of my information. 
It was due to Bishop Cheshire as well 
as to Mr. Jones that the Mission work at 
Valle Crucis was re-established, and a 
Mission House erected in 1896. A paro- 
chial school was again started. Rev. 
Samuel F. Adam followed Mr. Jones in 
charge there. 

Going on to Beaver Creek in Ashe- 
ville County, Bishop Cheshire's story 
of his efforts to hold a Service there re- 
veals the hardships of our Church pio- 
neers and some of the characteristics of 
Mr. Jones' evangelism. The Episcopal 
Church was unknown to the majority 
of the people. Certain families, espe- 
( Continued on Page 13) 



11 



CAMP FORECAST 

(Continued from Page 7 ) 
as is customary, and will teach a course 
on "The Book of Common Prayer." 
The Rev. G. Mark Jenkins, Rector of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, and Chair- 
man of the Youth Commission, is to 
serve as Chaplain and Vice-Director. 
The Rev. Joseph R. Clair, now Rector 
of Emmanuel Church, Corry, Pennsyl- 
vania, is to serve on the faculty, to- 
gether with the Rev. Dudley J. Stroup, 
Asheville; the Rev. W. C. Leach, Holy 
Cross, Val[e Crucis; the Rev. Grant 
Folmsbee, St. Luke's, Lincolnton; and 
the Rev. Yours Truly, Grace, Morgan- 
ton. 

We plan to have the following 
subjects: "Christian Personality 1 '; 
"How to Know the Will of God"; 
"Church Worship"; "The Art of Pray- 
er"; "The Prayer Book"; "Program 
Planning"; and a course on general 
teachings of the Church portrayed 
through lantern slides. The latter will 
be for the whole camp. The other 
courses are electives from which camp- 
ers are to choose the two which they 
prefer — or be placed by the Director 
where he prefers. Please indicate on 
the back of your registration blank the 
two courses you should like to take, 
regardless of what your age might be. 

Yes, there'll be swimming, hiking, 
baseball, dancing, campfires, stunts, 
singing, praying, eating, and sleeping — 
all, we trust, at the proper place and 
time! I'm giving you fair warning, send 
in your registration immediately. 



Women's Auxiliary 

News 



LLOYD WALL PAPERS 

Will enable you to personalize your 
rooms at a minimum of cost. Tell us 
your needs. We will mail samples. 

W. H. S. LLOYD CO. INC. 

48 West 48 St. New York. 19 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



The Five Spring District Meetings 
of the Woman's Auxiliary were held the 
first week in April. The Third District 
met in Lenoir, April 2nd — the Fourth 
District in Gastonia, April 3rd — the 
Second District in Brevard, April 4th — 
the First District in Highlands, April 
Sth — and the Fifth District at St. Cyp- 
rian's, Franklin, on April 7th. 

The inspirational speaker at all the 
meetings was Mrs. William J. Gordon 
of Spray, N. C. Her talk at the first 
four districts was on "The Meaning of 
the Auxiliary Prayer". At Franklin 
she spoke on the Missionary Fields of 
the Church with emphasis on her son's 
work, The Rev. William Gordon, in 
Alaska. Here she illustrated her talk 
with articles of interest sent her by her 
son from his field at Point Hope. 
The attendance at the Third District 
meeting in Lenoir and the Fifth District 
meeting at Franklin was excellent. At 
the other meetings the attendance was 
disappointingly small. However the 
women who took the opportunity of 
hearing Mrs. Gordon speak will never 
forget the great message she gave. They 
will never "say" the Auxiliary Prayer 
again but will devoutly "pray it". Her 
influence will be felt for a long time 
among the women of the Auxiliary of 
Western North Carolina. 

The Meeting held at St. Cyprian's, 
Franklin, was a fitting climax to a week 
of wonderful inspiration. The women 
of the mission led by their president, 
Mrs. Viola Lenoir, had spent many 
hours in preparation. 

At the close of this meeting a check 
for $50.00 was presented to Mrs. Gor- 
don for her son's work in Alaska, from 
the women of the Diocese. This sum 
represents the cost of feeding one of 
his dogs, used in carrying him over his 
field of service, for a year. 

There is to be one member of each of 
the five branches of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary in the Fifth District at the 



12 



Conference for Negroes held at St. 
Augustine's School at Raleigh, N. C, 
June 10th to 14th. The expenses will 
be paid by the Woman's Auxiliary of 
the Diocese. 

The Annual Meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Diocese will open at 
3 P. M., June 6th and close with lunch- 
eon June 7th at Kanuga. The cost per 
person for the convention will be $3.50. 
All women of the Diocese, not just dele- 
gates, are urged to attend this meeting. 
For detailed information and reserva- 
tions write the Auxiliary President, Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney, "Lone Pine", Morganton, 
N. C. 

Mrs. Donnell Van Noppen 
cepted the office of Secretary 
motion and Race Relations 
Woman's Auxiliary. Her address 
Dowe St., Morganton, N. C. 



has ac- 
of Pro- 
of the 



THE REV. MILNOR JONES 

(Continued from Page 11) 

daily the Hamiltons, were favorable to 
the Church. "He had set forth in his 
preaching his conception of the history, 
character and claims of the Church, and 
its essential superiority to all modern 
organizations, and had not failed to give 
very free expression to his unfavorable 
opinion of the Baptists and Methodists." 
Bishop Cheshire came for a visit on a 
Sunday, for purposes of Confirmation 
and Holy Communion. He held a ser- 
vice the Friday night before in the 
Academy Building, which our Church 
had rented for Mission purposes. On 
Sunday a crowd of men gathered in 
front of the building, and prevented the 
Bishop and Rev. John Seagle, then a 
layman, from entering. The Bishop's 
tact prevented any riotous outbreak and 
the services were held on the lawn of 
Rufus Hamilton's home. 

Mr. Jones was of vigorous intellect, 
of friendly nature, beloved by the coun- 
try people, rough and ready in his ways, 
and loved argument and controversy. 
He laid foundations on which others 
have built. He was in bad health when 
he left our field, and died in California. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, A. M., President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

10th, 11th, 12th grades of High School and 
two years college work. All academic courses 
fully accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

For Catalogue and Book of Views write 

E. F. Stoughton, Business Manager 



SCHOOL for HOVS 



nermediate School : Seventh to Ninth 
Grades. Upper School : College En- 
trance Requirements. Sailing and other 
Salt-water Sports on the Rappahan- 
nock River. 
Apply to The Rev. S. Janney Hutton, 

Headmaster, Christchurch School, 
Christchurch, Va. 



MEMORIAL WINDOWS 

-By- 

HIGH POINT GLASS & 

DECORATIVE CO. 

A. W. Klemme, Pres., Mgr. 
High Point North Carolina 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVTLLE, VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 

Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



13 



The Reconstruction and Advance Fund 

By the Rev. Charles Leavell 



The figures given here are those 
compiled by the Diocesan Chairman of 
Promotion from special gifts given Re- 
construction and Advance through Mr. 
W. H. Stewart, from payments already 
made from general canvass to Mr. Wm. 
M. Redwood, Diocesan Treasurer, from 
certain parish treasurers, and from 
priests who have sent in reports of can- 
vass, including as yet unpaid pledges. 
The sum total is most encouraging; the 
Diocese is already over her quota offic- 
ially set up by the Council of the 
Diocese. 

However, as some have observed, this 
Diocese did not increase the original 
quota it assigned itself when the Na- 
tional Church increased her quota from 
$5,000,000.00 to $8,800,000.00. 

We are therefore anxious to go several 
thousand dollars over the original quota 
we set. We have done very well in 



many cases and in many places. Nine 
parishes out of eighteen have reached 
or exceeded their quotas, in some cases 
very substantially. Thirteen missions 
have done so, with instances of doub- 
ling or tripling the quota. Every parish 
with a priest resident has reported at 
least some progress. Of the nineteen 
places which have reported nothing thus 
far we are confident that in many in- 
stances there has already been much 
done about which we simply have not 
heard. 

It is not too late to give to this fund, 
if you or your congregation have not 
done so — or even if your congregation 
has exceeded its quota and you your- 
self have not yet given to it. We as a 
Diocese are not quite content with hav- 
ing exceeded our quota; we know that 
Western North Carolina may well be 
called on to make up for the deficiencies 
and weakness of some other Diocese. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



14 



THE RECONSTRUCTION AND 
ADVANCE FUND 

PAID OR 

PARISH: QUOTA: PLEDGED: 

Asheville, Trinity $3,060.00 $4,189.50* 

Asheville, St. Mary's ___ 522.65 560.25* 

Asheville, St. Matthias' 248.88 No Report 

Biltmore, All Souls 1.700.00 3,026.25* 

Brevard. St. Phillip's ___ 321.47 230.00 

Flat Rock, St. John's ___ 244.80 No Report 

Fletcher, Calvary 684.20 1,057.00* 

Gastonia, St. Mark's __ _ 1,231.96 458.53 

Hendersonville, St. James 1,088.50 562.76 

Hickory, Ascension 414.80 200.00 

Lenoir, St. James' 808.60 900.00* 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's __ 497.60 163.36 

Marion, St. John's 273.77 128.00 

Morganton, Grace 1,555.50 3,111.14* 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis 1,061.89 1,249.80* 

Tryon, Holy Cross 1,338.10 1,585.00* 

Waynesville, Grace 228.14 225.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's __ 186.60 350.00* 

Total For Parishes $15,467.46 $17,996.59* 

PAID OR 

MISSION: QUOTA: PLEDGED 

Arden, Christ School ___$ 119.00 $ 119.00* 

Asheville, Grace 41.48 No Report 

Asheville, St. Lukes' 38.37 25.00 

Asheville, The Redeemer 63.29 100.00* 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel 76.74 86.00* 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 130.66 93.41 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 33.18 No Report 
Bessemer City, 

St. Andrews 25.93 No Report 

Black Mountain, 

St. James 259.25 900.00* 

Blowing Rock, 

Stringfellow Memorial 107.85 No Report 

Boone. St. Luke's 31.11 100.00* 

Burke County, St. Paul's 25.93 11.53 

Canton, St. Andrew's __ 176.29 25.00 

Cashier's, Good Shepherd 17.00 No Report 

Cherokee Mission 17.00 No Report 

Cullowhee, St. David's__ 13.48 No Report 

Edneyville, St. Paul's— 36.07 36.07* 

Edneyville, St. Peter's. _ 17.63 No Report 

Franklin, St. Agnes 155.50 120.00 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's__ 27.63 1.45 
Glendale Springs, 

Holy Trinity 25.93 30.45* 

Highlands. Incarnation.. 259.50 150.00 

High Shoals, St. John's.. 33.15 No Report 

Hot Springs, St. John's— 17.00 17.00* 
Legerwood, 

Chapel of Rest 130.66 130.66* 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 31.11 16.00 
Lincolnton, Woodside, 

Our Saviour 32.15 15.50 

Linville, All Saints 22.10 No Report 



Little Switzerland 

Resurrection 51.85 No Report 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 31.11 76.23* 

Murphy, Messiah 33.18 50.00* 

Penland, Good Shepherd 51.85 3.90 
Quaker Meadows, 

St. Mary's 31.11 17.50 

Rutherford Missions 13.48 No Report 

Rutherfordton. 

St. Gabriels' 31.11 No Report 

Saluda, Transfiguration 138.28 No Report 

Shelby, The Redeemer. _ 45.65 50.00* 

Sylvia, St. John's 13.48 25.00* 

Todd, St. Matthews 13.48 No Report 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 21.78 No Report 

Upward, St. John 

The Baptist 103.70 No Report 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 394.06 335.00 

Anonymous 100.00 

Totals For Missions__$2,939.08 $2,548.65 

Totals For The 

Diocese $18,406.54 $20,545.24* 

*Indicates payment or over-payment of quota. 



Samuel FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 




Tfie BrtUrson School 



Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. "Viese, Supt . 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 

DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



15 



Mrs, £. V* Shoaias 
69 Charlotte Sfc« 




CLERGY OF DIOCESE TO MEET 

The clergy of the Diocese will hold a 
special one-day meeting in the parish 
house of Grace Church, Morganton, on 
Thursday, May 23, at which time the 
Rev. Edgar Neff, Field Secretary of 
the National Council, will bring to their 
attention the new promotion plans of 
the National Council. The Rt. Rev. 
R. E. Gribbin, Bishop of the Diocese, 
stated that the meeting is important 
and urges that all clergy be present. 



ST. MARY'S, QUAKER MEADOWS 

The Young People at St. Mary's, 
Quaker Meadows, have formed a Junior 
Choir. This is quite an addition to the 
church service, since there was no choir 
formerly. At Christmas the Young 
People presented a pageant which 
everyone enjoyed very much. 



The Commencement exercises for the 
Class of 1946 at Patterson School will 
be held in the Chapel of Rest, Leger- 
wood, at 10:30 A. M. on Friday, May 
24. The Rev. G. Mark Jenkins, Fletcher, 
will be the speaker. 



ROY H. McDUFFIE Jr. 

Specializing in 

* Estate Tax Analysis 
'Business Insurance 

* Retirement Income 

* Endowments 

401-2-3 Public Service Bldg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Phone 7167-7168 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

THE CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 



16 




3M£tgMan& 
CTjttrdjman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



[UNE, 1946 



NO. 3 



DIOCESAN CONVENTION ISSUE 




The above is a photograph of the proposed Church of the Transfigura- 
tion, Bat Cave. It shows a model of the church, which was made by Dr. 
James Murray Washburn, of Lake Lure. The new church will replace the 
one destroyed by fire May 19, 1945. Bishop Paul Matthews, retired, of 
Princeton, New Jersey, gave the site on which the new church is being 
built under the supervision of the rector, the Rev. Frank A. Saylor. 



©if? ifigtjlanft 
(Eljurrljmatt 

Box 169 Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin. D. D.. Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. F. M. Tongue Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



Cherokee 

It was inspiring to see at our recent 
Convention the first Indian who had 
ever taken his seat as a lay delegate in 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina. 
It is significant too that the mission for 
an out-door race is to bear the name of 
the great out-door Saint, Francis of 
Assisi. 

Most appropriate is it that the man 
responsible for the establishment of the 
work among the Cherokees should be 
the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan. He was 
born in what was Cherokee country and 
has always been deeply sensitive to the 
wrongs done this once powerful tribe 
by white men and their Government. 

May he be richly rewarded in his 
efforts to bring all the blessed gifts 
which the Church has to bestow, to 
these true Americans, descendants of the 
reception committee that greeted the 
forebears of some of us when they first 
climbed the slopes of the Blue Ridge 
and the Smokies in search of a new 
home. 



RECONSTRUCTION AND ADVANCE 

Someone recently asked the question 
as to how our giving to this fund com- 
pared with that of other dioceses. This 
can not be determined immediately as 
all the figures are not in. We doubt if 
comparisons here are any less odious 
than elsewhere. What we should ask is 
not whether we did as well or better than 
the Diocese of Laodicea, but did we do 
our full duty? 

In a diocese containing so many peo- 
ple, with wandering feet we wonder if 
there are not still quite a number who 
were absent when the matter was pre- 
sented in their parishes, who would not 
like to feel that they had contributed 
nothing. If this applies to you why not 
speak to your rector about it. 



Finance 

At the recent Convention a budget 
was adopted that did not suit every- 
body. Perhaps it would be better to 
say, "A budget was adopted, period". 
For budgets never suit everybody. 
However if we do not like it, we have 
no one but ourselves to blame, as we 
elect the Executive Council, which in 
turn creates the Department of Finance. 

As a matter of fact Mr. Balthis, the 
retiring chairman, merely did what the 
Executive Council instructed him to do. 
No one can say that the method used 
in determinating quotas and assess- 
ments is unfair even though some may 
rightfully question its wisdom. The 
fact is that some system has to govern 
and however much we may not like it, 
the new figures may reveal that our 
particular parish or mission has not 
been carrying its share of the load. 

The important fact to remember is 
that these are days of prosperity and 
that both the National Church and the 
diocese are right in asking for larger 
giving. Hence the Highland Church- 
man urges every one not to allow this 
matter to grow cold, but to resolve to 
do all within your power to see that 
at next fall's canvass your parish does 
not fail to go forward in missionary 
giving. 



Annual Convention Held at All Souls 



The Twenty-fourth Annual Conven- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina met at All Souls Church, 
Biltmore, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
May 14th and 15th. The Convention 
opened with a celebration of Holy Com- 
munion by the Bishop, assisted by the 
two Deans of the Convocation. At 
11:15 a.m. the Convention formally 
opened its business sessions with the 
roll call and organization of the Con- 
vention. The Rev. J. P. Burke was re- 
elected unanimously to be the secretary 
of the Diocese. Following the Bishop's 
annual address to the Convention, the 
Bishop led in prayers for the Missionary 
work for the Church. 

At. 1 p.m. a luncheon was served in 
the Parish House, at which the Rev. 
I. Harding Hughes, Chaplain of St. 
Mary's School and Junior College, was 
the speaker. 

The Convention reconvened at 2:30 
p.m. to hear reports of the officers, exec- 
utive council, and committees of the 
Diocese. 

Mr. William Redwood was unani- 
mously re-elected treasurer of the Dio- 
cese, and the Convention expressed its 
appreciation for his untiring services 
to the Church. 

The remainder of the afternoon ses- 
sion was devoted to nominations for the 
various offices and to other routine 
business. 

At 8 p.m. Tuesday evening, Even- 
song was sung in the Church, followed 
by three 15-minute addresses by the 
three heads of the Diocesan schools: 
The Rev. Peter W. Lambert, Appalach- 
ian School, Penland; The Rev. A. Rufus 
Morgan, director of the Southern Rural 
Church Leadership School, to be held 
at Valle Crucis this summer; and Mr. 
George Wiese, Patterson School, Leger- 
wood. 

On Wednesday morning, the Rev. 
I. N. Northup, rector of All Souls 



Church, celebrated Holy Communion, 
assisted by the Bishop and the secretary 
of the Diocese. At 9:30 a.m., The Rev. 
Dudley J. Stroup, assisted by the Rev. 
W. C. Leach, read Morning Prayer, and 
at 10 a.m. the business session was 
resumed, and the various offices of the 
Diocese were filled. The Convention 
adjourned in the early afternoon. 



GENERAL CONVENTION 
DELEGATES ELECTED 

Delegates to the General Convention 
to be held this fall at Philadelphia were 
elected as follows: Clerical delegates, 
The Rev. G. F. Rogers, The Rev. G. M. 
Jenkins, The Rev. C. G. Leavell, and 
the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan. The Lay 
delegates to the General Conevntion 
will be the Messrs. W. M. Redwood, 
A. B. Stoney, William Balthis, and 
George Wiese. 

The alternate clerical delegates are 
The Reverends J. P. Burke, B. M. 
Lackey, W. C. Leach, and I. N. North- 
up. The alternate lay delegates are 
the Messrs. Fred Seeley, W. P. Bacon, 
V. Jordan Brown, and William Kirk. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL CHOSEN 

The Rev. G. F. Rogers, The Rev. 
W. C. Leach, Mr. George Wiese, Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney, and Mr. C. C. Dawson 
were elected members of the Executive 
Council of the Diocese to serve for 
three year terms. 



ECCLESIASTICAL COURT 

The following were elected members 
of the Ecclesiastical Court of the Dio- 
cese: The Rev. Charles Burnett, The 
Rev. B. M. Lackey, The Rev. A. P. 
Mack, The Rev. D. J. Stroup, and The 
Rev. I. N. Northup. 



Shall We Tell Them the Truth? 



By The Rt. Rev. Austin Pardue, Bishop of Pittsburgh 



It is too bad that good church people 
are so rarely instructed sufficiently in 
the Church's doctrine of Immortality 
to face death with calm confidence and 
quiet assurance. The blame, as a rule, 
rests with the clergyman who has not 
taught the faith. It has been my fre- 
quent experience to go into sick rooms, 
where the patients were expected to die, 
and to have the families caution me to 
say nothing that would make them 
aware of the seriousness of their condi- 
tion. The families to which I refer 
are often church members in good 
standing. Time and again so-called 
Christians neither want their loved ones 
to face the truth, nor do they themselves 
believe enough in the central theme of 
Christianity to have faith in the Resur- 
rection. On the other hand, the tactful 
but honest approach which comes after 
prayer for guidance by the Holy Spirit 
is almost the greatest comfort a dying 
person can have. 

Right now, as I write this book, a 
charming elderly lady is dying a slow 
death from a dread disease in a nearby 
hospital. The family did not think it 
wise to discuss death with her but when 
they invited me to call on her, they did 
not limit my visit by saying, "Don't 
let her know how badly off she is". 
When I did see her, it took only a few 
minutes for her to talk about her death 
as imminent. How foolish it would 
have been for me to try to talk her out 
of it. She faced the prospect with me 
quite calmly without emotion. I told 
her that she could undoubtedly be of 
great service to her family in her next 
life because of the new clarity of her 
vision and the greater understanding 
she would have in saying her prayers. 
I also talked to her about her continual 
growth in the next life, and her new 
opportunities there. She not only paid 
great attention to what I had to say, 
but she was delighted and relieved. 

When I was Rector of Gethsemane 



Church, Minneapolis, a parishioner was 
dying from a long and lingering disease 
and it was my privilege to call on her 
many times. She wanted to talk about 
death, which we did, and as usual, the 
patient received great mental relief as 
well as spiritual comfort, even to the 
point of light-heartedness. When the 
end was near I called on her again and 
she asked me to pray that she be per- 
mitted to live for three more days. 
When I asked why, she stated that 
several of her family were coming home 
and she wanted to live until they ar- 
rived because she had helpful things to 
tell them. I saw no reason why such 
a request could not be made and offered 
the petition. When all the family had 
arrived and had conversed with her, she 
slipped off into a state of coma from 
which such cases rarely arouse. I 
received a phone call informing me of 
her condition, and went out to the 
house. I stood at the foot of her bed 
for a minute and prayed for her quiet 
bodily release, but to my amazement 
her breathing became easy and she 
opened her eyes and looked at me with 
a wonderful smile and said, 'T knew 
you'd come before I went. Thanks so 
much for the prayer. I talked to them 
all, and I feel quite relieved. Give me 
the Blessing and then I'll go." I walked 
to the side of her bed, took her hand 
and asked her to please remember me 
when she arrived on the other side as 
I certainly would need her clear vision 
and prayers. She nodded assurance, 
and smiled. I gave her the Final Bless- 
ing and she slipped away. 

How much better it is, wherever pos- 
sible, to give the dying a preparation 
which will let them go on in the truth 
rather than in a state of fear. Think 
of it from the angle of the dying person. 
Do they not have a right to the truth? 
Too often, the family that tries to pro- 
tect the patient from a desired discus- 
sion of death is not trying to protect 



the dying, but themselves. They are 
sincere but misguided. 

Death is the one factor which every 
human soul must inevitably face and 
the sooner we bring it out into the open 
the better off we will all be. When we 
link up the two worlds of the seen and 
the unseen by the Sacrament of the 
Holy Communion and by prayers which 
set up an inter-communication system, 
we will be well on the way towards 
Christian maturity and psychological 
security. 

Of course, the best way to handle this 
whole matter is to have family discus- 
sions of the subject when everyone is 
quite well and normal. The matter 
should not be put off until desperate ill- 
ness occurs. But, we warn against such 
extreme foolishness as those who come 
into sick rooms with a "Prepare to 
Meet Thy God" attitude. It is bad to 
force a sick person to face the subject 
of death when they have no desire to 
do so. The discussion must always 
start from the patient, never from the 
visitor. Talk over death when you are 
all well, and use great wisdom with one 
who is sick, but when the patient so 
desires, face it. 



FAMINE RELIEF MONEY RAISED 

The members of St. James' Parish, 
Hendersonville, held open house at the 
Parish House on May 19, at which time 
a drive was inaugurated to raise funds 
and foods for Emergency Famine Re- 
lief. 

Rev. J. D. Barringer, pastor of the 
Lutheran Church, who was chaplain 
for a B-29 Group and who saw service 
on every continent during the war, 
spoke on conditions which he had ob- 
served particularly in China and India, 
resulting from want of food. 

Gifts of money and food were con- 
tributed in what is planned as a con- 
tinuing move to aid the famine sufferers 
— $150 has already been forwarded to 
the Presiding Bishop's Fund, and it is 
expected that additional funds will be 
sent within a short time. 



Trustees Named 

Bishop Gribbin nominated Mr. 
Kingsland Van Winkle, Asheville at- 
torney, to serve as Chancellor of the 
Diocese in his Annual Address to the 
Convention. 

The Bishop also announced the ap- 
pointment of Mr. V. Jordan Brown to 
serve as trustee of the Diocese. These 
nominations were made necessary by 
the death of Mr. Haywood Parker, who 
held both offices for a great number of 
years. Mr. Van Winkle is a member of 
the firm of Harkins, Van Winkle and 
Walton, and has been active in the work 
of All Souls Church for many years. 
Mr. Brown is an official of the Ashe- 
ville Mica Company and a member of 
Trinity Church, Asheville. 

The Convention elected Mr. John 
Schley of Calvary Church, Fletcher, a 
trustee of the Diocese. Dr. W. E. 
Wilmerding, of Skyland, was elected a 
trustee of the University of the South 
at Sewanee, Tenn. 

The Rev. B. M. Lackey and Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney were named trustees of 
St. Mary's School and Junior College, 
Raleigh, to serve a six-year term. 

The Rev. Grant Folmsbee and Mrs. 
William Balthis were elected trustees 
of the Thompson Orphanage at Char- 
lotte. 



Standing Committee 
Elected 

The Convention elected the following 
to the Standing Committee of the Dio- 
cese: The Rev. J. P. Burke, The Rev. 
G. M. Jenkins, The Rev. G. F. Rogers, 
The Rev. C. G. Leavell, Mr. A. B. 
Stoney, Mr. William M. Redwood, Mr. 
William Balthis, and Mr. F. P. Bacon. 



JOHN E. SCHLEY 

Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



Question Box 



By The Rev. ]. P. Burke 

How does one become a Communi- 
cant of a Parish or Mission? 

1. By being confirmed in that 
Parish or Mission and making your 
communion there. 

2. By being transferred to a Parish 
or Mission and making your commun- 
ion there. 

How does one transfer from one 
Parish to another? 

Cannon 15, "Of Regulations Respect- 
ing the Laity", given in our Diocesan 
Canons on page 27, tells you how. 
Briefly, the process is as follows: You 
simply procure from the Rector or 
Minister-in-charge, or, if there be no 
Rector or Minister, from one of the 
Wardens, a certificate addressed to the 
Rector or Minister of the congregation 
to which removal is desired. This cer- 
tificate, a fixed form, states that you are 
a communicant of said Parish, in good 
standing, if you are, and, are hereby 
transferred. 

Note the regulation says "A com- 
municant — shall be entitled to receive 
and shall procure from the Rector or 
Minister — a certificate," etc. The 
initative should be taken by the com- 
municant. 

Why is this "Regulation" necessary? 

1. In some of our cities there are 
fifteen or more parish churches. Ob- 
viously, you could not be accounted a 
member of each and every one. A 
communicant in good standing may 
make his or her communion in any of 
our churches throughout the world, but 
he should not be accounted a communi- 
cant of more than one Parish or Mission 
at any given time. 

2. If there were no such system of 
transfers, our statistics of Church 



membership would be even more unre- 
liable than they are now. 

3. Since our Diocesan Conventions 
are held at different times, from Janu- 
ary to June, if there were no system of 
transfers, a person could vote in three 
or four different Conventions in a 
single year. 

4. It gives a Rector a definite list of 
people for whose spiritual care he is 
responsible. 



THE CHURCH OF THE 
TRANSFIGURATION 

Bat Cave, N. C. 

By 'The Rev. Frank. A. Saylor 

Some of you want to know about the 
little Church in the mountains which 
is called the Transfiguration and so I 
will tell you part of the story. 

The Sisters of the Transfiguration of 
Glendale, Ohio, are responsible for its 
beginnings. Along about 1914 they 
moved a small school house from the 
valley, to the old site' near the bridge 
on the Asheville Highway. There it 
grew from a one-room affair to a church 
and library and clubroom. 

The next move was to "make it over" 
into a very beautiful place, by refinish- 
ing it inside and out, and making it 
habitable in cold weather. This church 
was burned on May 14, 1945, because 
of a fire next door. 

Then a lot was given by Bishop Mat- 
thews near the rectory on the Charlotte 
Highway, and a new one started. We 
were very hopeful of a stone veneer 
building, much the same inside as the 
old one. 

To April 1st of this year, we had in 
hand what we needed, less $2,000.00 on 
the estimate. Since then we have had 
gifts of $400.00, and one to come in 
later of a few dollars. So you see, 
despite the war conditions and high 
wages, we are quite sure now to finish 
it — with the help of those who are 
interested. 



Highlights From the Bishop's Address 



At the Annual Convention, Bishop 
Gribbin delivered his annual address to 
the Convention, covering the changing 
conditions in the Diocese during the 
past year and welcoming the improve- 
ments which have taken place. 

Speaking of the death of Mr. Hay- 
wood Parker, the Bishop stated, "I 
missed him nearly every day. My file 
of letters from him is larger than that 
from anybody else. Mr. Parker's time 
was given freely and readily to the work 
of the Church in so many departments, 
especially that of the diocesan schools. 
He represented the Diocese in several 
General Conventions. Mr. Parker was 
equally prominent in civic affairs. His 
ability and his service to his alma 
mater, the University of North Caro- 
lina, were recognized by that institution 
in conferring on him the degree Doctor 
of Laws." 

The Bishop also referred to the death 
of Mrs. Thomas C. Wetmore, who died 
during the past year, stating that Mrs. 
Wetmore helped her husband in the 
founding of Christ School at the begin- 
ning of this century. "Her intelligent 
zeal and unflagging interest were re- 
warded by enlisting many financial 
supporters of the school and by securing 
the Rev. Reuben R. Harris as Head- 
master ... If you seek Mrs. Wetmore's 
monument, you will find it graven in 
the lives of men and boys who came 
under her influence and now rise up 
and call her blessed." 

The Bishop stated that the Rev. Bos- 
ton M. Lackey, Jr., is expected to return 
to this Diocese about September 1. He 
welcomed the Rev. William T. Capers, 
Jr., to the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina as the new rector of Holy 
Cross Church, Tryon. He also spoke 
of the Rev. James McKeown, who is 
beginning his work as priest-in-charge 
of St. Luke's, Boone, and associated 
missions. Bishop Gribbin paid tribute 
to the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan upon the 
foundation of the first Indian Mission in 



our Diocese, St. Francis of Assisi, 
Cherokee. 

Concluding his address, the Bishop 
stated: "It does not require a seer of 
the first order to state that 'The time is 
out of joint.' We hear from various 
quarters statements about what the 
Church should do, must do, if she is to 
survive. The Church will not be 
frightened into sponsoring movements 
of one kind or another to save her life, 
or to appear in a favorable light. I 
repeat a quotation from my address 
two years ago. 'What is the task of 
this Church? Principally to BE itself 
and NOT DO anything at all. All that 
it does is secondary and expressive of 
what it is. And, first of all, its duty is 
to BE in living actuality that thing, 
namely the fellowship of those who 
have received the power of the Holy 
Spirit through the revelation of the 
love of God in Christ . . . worship is 
the business of its life . . . the Church 
exists, first and foremost, to be the 
fellowship of those who worship God in 
Christ. It is only when we understand 
the Church as existing first and foremost 
to be a worshipping community that 
we begin to understand either its nature 
or its task.' (Wm. Belden Noble 
Lectures by the late Archbishop Wil- 
liam Temple.) We are not here to say 
what forms of government shall be 
recognized or what the terms are upon 
which our industries are to be operated. 
We are here definitely to say to all men 
that there is one God and Father of us 
all in whom we live and move and have 
our being — that our first duty is to Him, 
and the measure with which we fulfill 
our duty to God will determine the 
measure with which we fulfill our duty 
to our fellow man. God is first; man is 
second. If God is placed first, man's 
second place will be just and right. We 
cannot love God and neglect our fellow- 
man, but we can neglect both God and 
man. Our job is to lift up Christ. 
Let us then attend to our own business, 
seeking first the kingdom of God and his 
righteousness." 



Diocesan Clergy Meet 

The clergy of the Diocese met at 
Grace Church, Morganton, on Thurs- 
day, May 23, at the request of Bishop 
Gribbin. Opening at 10 a.m., the 
Rev. Edgar R. Neff, National Council 
Field Officer for the Fourth Province, 
led a discussion of the plans and pro- 
gram of the Church during the next year. 

Mr. Neff outlined the new portfolio 
which the National Council is publish- 
ing each year to take the place of the 
diverse material which has been sent the 
clergy at various times during the year 
in the past. Under the new plans, each 
clergyman will have on his desk the 
National Council plans for the entire 
year, and will be able to turn to any 
section of it for whatever needs he may 
have. Mr. Neff stated that the new 
program will save the National Council 
about two-thirds of its mailing, and 
will bring within reach of each priest 
the entire year's plans. 

The meeting adjourned at 4 p.m. 




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BOOK REVIEW 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



THE GREAT DIVORCE 

By C. S. Lewis, Fellow of Magdalen 

College, Oxford. 

The Macmillan Company, $1.50. 

The run of the mill Churchman, if 
he wants to know what sends people to 
hell, can find the answer in this latest 
book by the Church's lay theologian. 
And the chances are that the reader will 
have reason to stop and think about 
himself. Actually this is a popular 
treatment of something that orthodox 
teachers have maintained for centuries; 
namely that hell is not so much the 
punishment for violence and lust and 
fraud, as it is the choice of those who 
refuse to surrender their own wills to 
God. 

So those who choose hell rather than 
Heaven are different from what we 
might expect. A murderer has been 
accepted, but his old foreman who in- 
sists upon his rights returns to hell. 
A Bishop has grown so enamoured of 
his free inquiry and honest convictions 
that he cannot endure certainty in 
Heaven. The woman who had given 
her life to making something of her 
husband, irrespective of his wishes, 
could not stay. Another, who made a 
religion of mother-love was in like case. 
Yet a man who renounced his sensuality 
was enabled to remain. As the guides 
in Heaven expresses it, "In the end 
there are only two kinds of people: 
those who say to God, 'Thy will be 
done', and those to whom God says, in 
the end, 'Thy will be done'." And the 
less objectionable our false god, the 
greater the danger that we shall refuse 
to exchange it for the true one. 

CHURCH SERVICES 

BLACK MOUNTAIN: St. lames' Church, 
Rev. J. H. Rhys. Church School 10:15 
A. M. Services 2nd and 4th Sunday at 
7:30 A. M. Every Sunday at 11:15 A. M. 



Report Given on Diocesan Schools 



At the Tuesday evening service at 
All Souls Church, Biltmore, reports 
were given on the work of 'the schools 
of the Diocese, following the evening 
service. Fifteen-minute addresses were 
made by the Rev. P. W. Lambert, of the 
Appalachian School at Penland; The 
Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, director of the 
Southern Rural Church Leadership 
School, which is to be held at Valle 
Crucis, June 17 to August 2, and Mr. 
George Wiese, head of the Patterson 
School at Legerwood. 

Father Lambert spoke of his work at 
Appalachian, stating that the objective 
of the school is to take young children 
from an abnormal home situation and 
to offer them shelter, security, and a 
normal family life. The enrollment in- 
cludes the first seven public school 
grades. There in the school, the child- 
ren are given an education, and at the 
same time are aided in living a normal 
rounded life. Prayer and worship is 
made a normal part of the everyday 
curriculum. Father Lambert stated 
that he was uncertain what the immed- 
iate future of the school is, as we enter 
the inflationary post-war period. The 
school has a full enrollment, and it is 
hoped that it will not suffer too much 
as a result of the rise in prices and 
scarcity of the necessities of life. 

The Rev. Mr. Morgan discussed 
plans for the Southern Rural Church 
Leadership School. He stated that the 
school has been established by the 
Diocese, in cooperation with the Prov- 
ince of Sewanee, the National Council 
of the Episcopal Church, and the 
Woman's Auxiliary. It is hoped that 
students will attend who are interested 
in doing rural work, especially in the 
southern mountain districts. Students 
may be clergy, theological students, and 
women church workers, and among 
them it is expected that there will be 
returned service chaplains. Mr. Morgan 
stated that the school is still an experi- 
ment, but it is hoped that the experience 
this summer will lead to its permanent 
establishment as a part of our Diocesan 
life. 



Mr. George Wiese spoke of the char- 
acter building of young boys at the 
Patterson School. Boys of high school 
age are given the finest education possi- 
ble, and, in addition to their regular 
studies, are taught agriculture, forestry, 
and industrial arts. He spoke of the 
necessity for expansion, and of his hope 
that the Diocese and friends of the 
school would aid them in building the 
necessary additions. At the present 
time, the school has a capacity of 60 
students, but it is hoped to double the 
enrollment in the next few years. Mr. 
Wiese foresaw the return of many 
people to farm life as a result of the 
war, and believes that the education 
and training given at Patterson School 
will equip the boys for rural living. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 
CONVENTION HELD 

The annual convention of the Dioces- 
an Woman's Auxiliary was held at 
Kanuga Lake, Hendersonville, Thurs- 
day and Friday, June 6 and 7. The two 
major addresses were given by Mrs. 
Francis Clarkson, of Charlotte, on the 
Federal Council of Churches, and Miss 
Edna Beardsley, National Secretary. 



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P%^i nock- 


mediate School : Seventh to Ninth 
es. Upper School : College En- 
e Requirements. Sailing and othei 
water Sports on the Rappahan 

River. 
r to The Rev. S. Janney Hutton, 
admaster, Christchurch School, 
Christchurch, Va. 






He 





MEMORIAL WINDOWS 

-By- 

HIGH POINT GLASS & 

DECORATIVE CO. 

A. W. Klemme, Pres., Mgr. 
High Point North Carolina 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 

Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



DIOCESAN BUDGET APPROVED 

After much discussion, the Conven- 
tion approved the budget proposed for 
the Diocese for the year 1947. The 
budget which was submitted to the 
Convention this year is significant in 
that increased amounts are being asked 
of the Parishes and Missions for both 
assessments and apportionments. In 
order to meet the Diocesan Expense 
Fund budget (necessitated by reduced 
income on invested funds, etc.), it be- 
came necessary to assess the amounts 
on all the parishes and missions by 8 
percent of a three-year average of their 
current expenses. 

In order to meet the large budget 
items for missionary stipends and the 
General Church Program, the Executive 
Council adopted a basis for setting the 
apportionments as follows: 22^ of a 
three-year average of current expenses 
on all parishes and missions, and the 
same figures as last year where no re- 
port was available. The Department 
of Finance stated that as far as the 
amount in the budget is concerned, there 
is no question but that every dollar is 
needed. 



GASTONIA VESTRY HONORS 
MISS YOUNG 

The Vestry of St. Mark's Parish, 
Gastonia, recently passed a memorial 
resolution, paying tribute to Miss Mary 
Amelia Young, who died on February 
25, 1946. Miss Young was a devoted 
and very efficient supervisor of the 
Altar Guild for 14 years before her 
death. 



"Men and Movements in the Amer- 
ican Episcopal Church," presenting 
from the standpoint of personality the 
life and work of leaders who shaped 
the thought of the Church from Colonial 
times, has just been published by 
Charles Scribner's Sons (500 pages, #4). 
The book was written by the official 
historiographer of the Chufch, Dr. E. 
Clowes Chorley. 



10 



Church Congress Organized At Hendersonville 



The preliminary meeting of the 
Church Congress, which was held at St. 
James Church, Hendersonville, April 
30-May 1, was a great success. Follow- 
ing the delightful dinner served by the 
women of St. James' Parish, the Church 
Congress was formally organized and 
the following officers elected: The Rev. 
J. P. Burke, president; Mr. F. W. Ew- 
bank, Hendersonville, vice-president; 
The Rev. Dudley J. Stroup, Asheville, 
secretary -treasurer; and Mr. F. P. 
Bacon, Tryon and The Rev. W. C. 
Leach, Valle Crucis, members of the 
Executive Committee. 

The Very Rev. William H. Nes, D.D., 
Dean of Christ Church Cathedral, New 
Orleans, La., was the speaker at both 
the evening and morning sessions. His 
subject at the evening session was de- 
voted to the question of church unity. 
He stressed the historical church, and 
the unity of the Anglican Communion 
in the whole world as two major factors 
which must not be overlooked in any 
discussion of Church unity. Dean Nes 
stated that he regarded any move 
toward union with any Christian body 
as being fatal to the historic church, 
unless the Anglican Communion through 
the Lambeth Congress is consulted. 

At the Wednesday morning session, 
Dean Nes spoke on other issues to be 
brought up at the General Convention 
this fall, devoting most of the time to 
the subject of Christian Marriage. 
Dean Nes stressed the Marriage vows 
taken by the persons seeking marriage 
as of primary importance and of the 
vow in our prayer book — especially the 
phrase "till death us do part" — as being 
inconsistent with the re-marriage of 
divorced persons. He also stated that 
the difficult cases which come up so 
frequently in these war-time years, are 
not to be treated lightly, but at the same 
time must not be allowed to lower the 
standards of Christian morality. 

At the dinner on Tuesday evening, 
The Rev. D. J. Stroup, temporary 



chairman of the Church Congress, was 
the toastmaster and introduced the 
speakers at the dinner. Bishop Gribbin 
welcomed those who attended the 
Congress and paid tribute to the Church 
Congress in the Linited States as one 
organization which it has been his desire 
to see at work in our Diocese. 

Mr. Frank W. Ewbank, of Hender- 
sonville, read a paper printed in the 
organ of the Church Congress, The 
Anglican Theological Review, which 
had been written by one of his brothers 
some years ago. It is the only paper 
known to have been published in the 
Anglican Theological Review by a 
person from the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina. 



TREASURER'S NEW ADDRESS 

The new address of Mr. William M. 
Redwood, Treasurer of the Diocese, 
since his retirement, is 20 Cedarcliff 
Road, Biltmore Forest, Biltmore, North 
Carolina. 



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Highland Churchman 
Subscriptions Changed 

At the Annual Convention, a change 
was made in the method of subscribing 
to the Highland Churchman. The 
Executive Council of the Diocese ap- 
proved a change in the method of 
subscribing so that everyone who 
pledges to the work of the Church, on 
either the black or the red side of the 
pledge card, will be entitled to a year's 
subscription to the magazine. In this 
way, it is hoped that our Diocesan organ 
will be sent to every family in the 
Diocese. Under the present subscript- 
ion method, only those who pledge to 



the Missionary work of the Church are 
entitled to a subscription. 



ROY H. McDUFFIE Jr. 

Specializing in 

* Estate Tax Analysis 

* Business Insurance 

* Retirement Income 

* Endowments 

401-2-3 Public Service Bldg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Phone 7167-7168 




BEACON BLANKETS 
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12 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



JULY, 1946 



NO. 4 




Qltjurrlfman 

Box 169 Asheville. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. F. M. Tongue Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



Church Congress 

The proximity of the Diocesan Con- 
vention plus the long thoughts of youth 
forced us to abstain last month from 
comment on the most significant event 
in the diocese for many years, namely 
the formation of a Regional Church 
Congress at Hendersonville on the first 
day of May. The enthusiasm there 
manifest, as well as the members who 
attended left no doubt in the mind of 
anyone that something had been inaug- 
urated which was here to stay. Like 
Oliver Twist many are asking for more 
and there are no parsimonious Bumbles 
who would deny us. Announcements 
of time and place of another meeting 
will soon be forthcoming. 

The inception of the Congress has 
raised a question in the minds of some 
as to the wisdom of another organiza- 
tion which will take clergy and laity 
from their parishes. The point is well 
taken if the meetings are tiring, bore- 
some, and lack intellectual stimulus. We 
already have Convocation and the 
Priests' Fellowship. The sum total per 
year of meetings of these three groups 



would be approximately eight. Is this 
too many occasions for clergy and laity 
to drop tasks at home and go elsewhere 
for fellowship and the sharing of minds? 
We do not think so. Convocation is 
partly intellectual and partly practical. 
In the course of the years it has accom- 
plished some useful things. The Priests' 
Fellowship is what its name implies but 
in addition to Fellowship it has produced 
some truly brilliant papers. The Con- 
gress is purely intellectual which does 
not mean merely high-brow. It will 
enable us to see truth from opposite but 
not necessarily contradictory points of 
view. 

The main question so it seems to us 
is the fact that the life of the Church 
seems to narrow and stagnate if not 
given intellectual stimulus. No parish 
priest can minister or preach effectively 
if his nose is forever kept on his own 
grindstone. No layman can give intel- 
ligent leadership to his fellows if his sun 
rises and sets in dear old St. Demas, in 
Laodicea. Convocation and Congress 
and Fellowship will, we are confident, in 
the very best sense broaden and deepen 
us all. 



Welcome Back 

Every year there come to our moun- 
tain parishes some warm-hearted Church 
folk who make it easier for us to carry 
on. They evidently are so happy in 
their parish relationships at home that 
they treat our local clergy as they would 
their own rector. They have often an 
uncanny way of discovering something 
lacking which the parish in which they 
are sojourning has been as yet unable 
to provide. They are particularly soli- 
citous for the welfare of the clergy who 
are frequently the recipients of new 
vestments, books, money for some parish 
needs or even a little spending money 
for personal use. We mention these 
material things because they are the 
outward tokens of warm generous 
hearts. How blessed it is to live in 
Western North Carolina parishes where 
these good angels come to make life 
happier for us all. 



A Message About Washington Cathedral From 
Your Diocesan Regent 

By Mrs. Henry Laurens 



As we anticipate the completion of the 
Reconstruction and Advance Fund, our 
thoughts should turn to another great 
project of our church, the plans for 
future building at Washington Cathed- 
ral. As Bishop Dun says, it is first of 
all a place of worship, a house of prayer 
open to all; a place high and lifted up, 
where the voice of divine charity and 
justice may be heard above the clamor 
of class, race or section. It is, too, a 
center of the highest type of Christian 
Education, with its three schools and its 
admirable College of Preachers, where 
our priests from all over the nation may 
come for inspiration and widening teach- 
ing to give them strength in their chosen 
work. 

In its dignity and beauty the Cathed- 
ral sets before us the majesty of great 
architecture and the blending of all arts 
to the glory of God. That its mission 
of inspiration to all our people and its 
breadth of service may grow continually, 
all Episcopalians are urged to cooperate 
in the raising of a Building Fund late 
in 1946, to be used in part for a War 
Memorial Chapel in honor of the men 
and women of the armed services who 
have made the supreme sacrifice. This 
-shrine will be known as the Patriots' 
Transept, will be ornamented with mili- 
tary insignia, and will contain Books of 
Remembrance, and also any personal 
service records submitted of the living. 
"The Patriots' Transept will thus honor 
both living and dead," explains Mr. 
George Wharton Pepper, Chairman of 
the Building Fund. "Erected on the 
highest ground in the Nation's capital, 
it will be for the soldier whom we know 
what the tomb at Arlington is for the 
soldier unknown." 

Let us bear in mind this means of 
consecration of our gifts and perpetua- 



tion of our loved ones in this National 
shrine. Let us in Western North Caro- 
lina be ready when the appeal comes, 
and let us urge upon all church mem- 
bers the value to our minds and spirits 
of this Cathedral of all the States, where 
all denominations may worship, and 
where the clergy seek every opportunity 
to hold services of common prayer to 
deepen the unity of God's people. And 
let us pray that in our day we may see 
the Cathedral soar closer to completion 
on its holy mount. 



A New Booklet On 
Church Music 

A new, inexpensive booklet on 
Church Music for the layman has re- 
cently been published by Morehouse- 
Gorham. The name is "In Every 
Corner Sing" and the price is only 50c 
per copy. 

Written by Dr. Joseph W. Clokey, 
Dean of the School of Fine Arts, Miami 
University, Oxford, Ohio, and an ex- 
perienced organist and choirmaster, this 
booklet is the result of his many years 
of work in the field of Church Music. 
The booklet lays great stress on congre- 
gational singing, what constitutes good 
church music, music in the small church, 
the volunteer choir, and many other 
related topics concerned with the good 
and bad in Church music. 

The purpose of the booklet is to 
provide an outline of Church Music 
for the average layman — the man in 
the pew. Members of Church Choirs, 
particularly, should own a copy of this 
booklet. The reading of it will stimu- 
late interest in, and appreciation of, 
good Church Music. 




The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, D.D.. S.T.D. 

The Highland Churchman is pleas- 
ed to publish a new picture of our 
Bishop for the first time in many years. 
Our readers are familiar with the old 
picture, taken some years ago, and we 
are sure this new one will be received 
with as much pleasure as The High- 
land Churchman takes in presenting it. 



News From Northwestern 
North Carolina 

Rogation Sunday was observed at 
Holy Cross Church, Valle Crucis, with 
the traditional services of beseeching 
God's blessing on the plantings at home 
and throughout the world. A new feat- 
ure this year was the adaptation of the 
ancient English Service of the Blessing 
of the Plow. At the Offertory, four of 
the young men, members of the Future 
Farmers of America Club, brought a 
plow to the pace at the altar rail. Using 
an ancient rite, the priest blessed the 
point, the moldboards and the handles. 
Actually of course, the plow should be 
blessed much earlier in the year. Plow 
Monday, in England, is the first Mon- 
day after the Epiphany. 

Following the service in the Church, 
the congregation went in procession to a 
site overlooking the valley for the Bless- 
ing of the Fields. Then a large crowd 
assembled in the School dining room for 
another annual feature, the Rogation 
Sunday dinner. The vast amounts of 
food that were brought served to fill the 
inner man and point up the significance 
of the day, that God will abundantly 
bless His people. 

***** 

Father Leach is pleased to announce 
that the slide film machine and slides 
for visual education have come and have 
been put to use. The sound movie pro- 
jector is still to be delivered. Through 
the showing of entertainment films every 
week for the community, and through 
the generosity of some donors within 
and without the Diocese, there is already 
at hand a fund of $218, which is just 
about half of the total cost. 

With the coming of the Rev. James 
McKeown to take charge of St. Luke's, 
Boone and the Ashe County Missions, 
new work will soon be started with the 
sizable congregation at Banner Elk. 
Father Leach has also been appointed 
officially as priest-in-charge of St. 
(Continued on Page 10) 





MISS PAGE BEGINS WORK 

Miss Patricia Page, the new mission 
worker at Bessemer City and High 
Shoals in the parish of Gastonia, is a 
recent graduate of Windham House, the 
national graduate training center for 
women in the Episcopal Church. She 
was born in Melrose, Massachusetts, 
and attended school there. She graduat- 
ed from Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts, in 1944, having majored 
in religious education and minored in 
sociology. 

In the fall of 1944, she began her 
course at Windham House in New 
York City, working towards a master of 
arts degree in religious education from 
Columbia University and Union Theo- 
logical Seminary and a certificate from 
General Theological Seminary for work 
in Bible, Church History, Christian 
Doctrine, Liturgies, Christian Ethics, 
and Pastoral Psychology. While at 
Windham House she did religious educa- 
tional work in two New York parishes — 
the Church of the Epiphany and the 
Church of the Resurrection. 

During the summer of 1945 she work- 
ed in the Diocese of Western North 



ASHTON ADVANCED TO 
PRIESTHOOD 

The Rev. George C. Ashton, Deacon- 
in-charge of St. Gabriel's Church, Ruth- 
erfordton, was advanced to the Sacred 
Priesthood on St. Peter's Day, June 19, 
at St. Matthias Church, Asheville, by 
Bishop Gribbin. 

The Rev. Tollie L. Caution. Secretary 
for Colored Work of the National Coun- 
cil, New York, preached the Ordination 
Sermon, and Archdeacon James T. Ken- 
nedy, of Asheville, presented the Ordi- 
nand. 

Mr. Ashton continues his work as 
Priest-in-charge of St. Gabriel's Church, 
Rutherfordton. 



CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER 
CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY 

On June 30 the Church of the Re- 
deemer, Asheville, celebrated the 45th 
anniversary of the Consecration of the 
church. At the evening service the 
Bishop preached the sermon and ad- 
ministered the Sacrament of Confirma- 
tion to seven persons. Just prior to the 
service Fr. Stroup baptized six children 
and adults. 

In addition to the Bishop, the Rev. 
Mark Jenkins of Calvary Church, 
Fletcher, was present and participated 
in the service. The Rev. Howard Rhys 
of St. James Church, Black Mountain, 
acted as chaplain to the Bishop. 

At the service at 9:30 a. m. the Holy 
Eucharist was offered for God's blessing 
upon the Church of the Redeemer and 
for the future of the Church in the com- 
munity. 

Carolina as a counselor at the Diocesan 
Young Churchman's Camp and in the 
vacation school program of the parishes 
of Morganton and Lincolnton. This 
summer she was again a counselor at the 
Diocesan Young Churchman's Camp. 
Following that, she is working in the 
Southern Rural Leadership School at 
Valle Crucis. She will start work defin- 
itely in Bessemer City and High Shoals 
in the first week of September. 



Women's Auxiliary 

News 



The Twenty-fourth Annual Conven- 
tion of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Diocese was held at Kanuga Lake on 
June 6 and 7, with a fine spirit pervad- 
ing the 125 women, clergymen and 
visitors. 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney, retiring president, 
presided at all sessions. At the opening 
session on Thursday afternoon, she gave 
her annual report of the work done in 
the branches, and urged the women to 
give, work, and pray more. 

Miss Lucy Fletcher was elected the 
new president of the Auxiliary, Mrs. 
Mark Jenkins, Secretary of Christian 
Education, Mrs. George Weise, Treas- 
urer of U. T. 0., and Mrs. Alice Max- 
well, Director of the Fifth District. 

Mrs. A. B. Stoney, Mrs. Mark Jen- 
kins, Mrs. T. J. Wooldridge, and Mrs. 
May T. New were elected delegates to 
the Triennial Convention, with Miss 
Fletcher, president - elect. Alternates 
elected were: Mrs. W. L. Balthis, Miss 
Mary Wood Sumner, Mrs. E. L. Kemp- 
er, Mrs. E. L. McKinsey, and Mrs. Alice 
Maxwell. Mrs. A. B. Stoney was elect- 
ed a new member of the nominating 
committee. 

After an interesting talk by the Bishop 



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on the work among the Indians at 
Cherokee and the plans for the erection 
of a Chapel there, it was voted to adopt 
this project for the Advance Work Of- 
fering for 1946. 

The highlights of the meeting were 
talks by Miss Edna B. Beardsley, Na- 
tional Secretary of the U. T. 0., and 
Mrs. Francis Clarkson, a prominent 
churchwoman of Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina. 

Miss Beardsley spoke of the meaning 
of the U. T. 0. She gave a brief history 
of the offering, told how the budget is 
made up, and of the new items being 
considered for the budget to be adopted 
at the Convention. 

Mrs. Clarkson talked most interest- 
ingly and informatively on the Federal 
Council of Churches. 

Other speakers giving special reports 
were Mrs. Manley Whisenant on the 
Thompson Orphanage, the Rev. C. G. 
Leavell on the Reconstruction and Ad- 
vance Fund, and Mrs. Henry Laurens 
on the National Cathedral. 

The budget for 1947, presented by 
Mrs. May T. New, was adopted after 
a lively discussion regarding the item 
of year books for each member of the 
Auxiliary. 

The inspirational part of the meeting 
was the preparation service on Thursday 
evening followed by Holy Communion 
Friday morning. 

At the close of Friday's session, the 
Bishop expressed his appreciation of 
Mrs. Stoney's fine leadership, and in- 
stalled the new officers, closing with the 
benediction. 

CHURCH SERVICES 

LINCOLNTON: St. Luke's, Service every 
Sunday 11. Sunday School, 10. Com- 
munion, 1st Sunday, 11. 3rd, 8:30. St. 
Cyprians, Service every Sun. 7:30 P. M. 

WOODSIDE: Our Savior, School 2:15 
Service 3 every Sunday. Communion, 
2nd Sunday, 10. Wednesday Bible 
Study, 7 P. M. Rev. Grant Folmsbee. 



A Visit to the General Theological Seminary 

By Father Sill 



I have been visiting my old Seminary 
in New York, attending the Commence- 
ment exercises, which included on one 
day the annual meeting of the Alumni 
Association. We have a Western North 
Carolina diocesan Alumni association, 
of which I am the president, there being 
10 alumni of the General in our diocese. 
We had a supper and meeting at Bishop 
Gribbin's last year; Bishop Gribbin is 
both an alumnus and a trustee of the 
Seminary. 

I felt it an honor to represent our 
group at this annual meeting at the Gen- 
eral. There was a Choral Requiem for 
the departed alumni of the past year, 
with the students assisting in rendering 
the service. This was followed by a 
business meeting, election of officers, 
etc. A paper was then read in regard 
to the need of more uniformity in our 
common worship by the Rev. Morton 
Stone. Luncheon was a happy occasion. 

As one passes through the entrance to 
the brick building on 9th Avenue (be- 
tween 20th and 21st Streets), a surprise 
awaits one in the beautiful campus, ex- 
tensive lawns, many trees, vines on the 
halls and dormitories, and, just now, 
borders of variegated iris along the 
paths. In the center of the campus is the 
large and beautiful Chapel of The Good 
Shepherd, with its lofty tower. And 
this attractive spot is found on the lower 
west side of the city, in the midst of 
apartments and other dwelling houses 
and office buildings. One senses an at- 
mosphere of the retired cloistered life. 
There still stands a three-storied stone 
building, in its own setting, one of the 
original Seminary buildings, erected in 
1835. It is called "Christmas House", 
because of the tradition that Dr. Clem- 
ent C. Moore, a Professor at the, Semi- 
nary, had it in mind in writing the poem, 
"'Twas the Night Before Christmas". 

A special feature of this Commence- 
ment was the unveiling of a portrait of 
Bishop Matthews, retired bishop of New 



Jersey, in Seabury Hall. The bishop 
has been a friend and benefactor of the 
Seminary, as he has also been to us in 
our diocese. He has a home near Bat 
Cave. 

The General Seminary is the largest 
of our seminaries, and is under the trus- 
teeship of the National Church. We 
have at present one student there from 
our diocese. The course of study is 
three years. The Very Rev. Hughell 
E. W. Fosbroke, D. D., LI. D., is Dean. 



McKEOWN TAKES CHARGE OF 
BOONE 

The Rev. James McKeown, of the 
Diocese of South Florida, arrived the 
middle of June to assume his duties as 
priest-in-charge of St. Luke's, Boone, 
and associate missions at Todd, Beaver 
Creek, and Glendale Springs. 

Mr. McKeown, who was ordained to 
the Priesthood on June 12 by Bishop 
Louttit, Suffragen Bishop of South 
Florida, has just completed a year's 
study at Drew Theological Seminary, 
Madison, N. J., receiving the degree of 
Master of Arts in Rural Sociology. He 
was graduated from the University of 
the South, Sewanee, Tenn., in 1943, and 
from the Theological School of that 
University in 1945. 

Mr. McKeown, who is married and 
has one child, has taken up residence in 
Boone. 



OUR COVER 

On the cover of this issue is a recent 
picture of St. Francis' Church, Ruther- 
fordton, which is to have a new rector, 
the Rev. Ralph Webster, until recently 
a missionary in Porto Rico. Fr. Web- 
ster begins his work at Rutherfordton 
on July 1. 




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:ffl .^rnQ'TTMA * iojo-W-genesee-sp I 

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George F. Wiese, Supt. 
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Young Churchmen 

By Ann Shuford 



The young people of the Diocese have 
much for which to be thankful. The 
Church gives so many things that are 
taken for granted and for which appre- 
ciation is neither shown nor spoken. 

Sixty young people of the Diocese 
were given a week of living, working, 
playing and worshipping together at 
Patterson School, June 9-15, at the an- 
nual camp held there under the direc- 
tion of the Rev. Charles Leavell. Classes 
were held each morning from 9:15 to 
12:45. The afternoons were devoted to 
athletics and swimming, and the even- 
ings were filled with entertainment of 
all kinds, from singing around the camp 
fire to short skits and square dancing in 
the library building of the school. 

Services were held twice daily, at 7:45 
A. M. and 6:45 P. M., together with 
noon-day prayers for Missions. 

One of the features of this year's camp 
was "Church Ways in Pictures", a 
course given by the Rev. W. C. Leach 
each day. Through the new art of visual 
education, the young people learned 
about the Church appointments, Church 
history, the Holy Communion, etc. 

A high-light of the week was the can- 
dlelight service on Friday evening, at 
which time the Young Churchmen pre- 
sented an offering of £250.00 to Mr. G. 
F. Wiese to help with the building of a 
new chapel for the School. The pre- 
sentation was made by Miss Helen 
Thomas, president of the young people, 
to Mr. Wiese. 

On Friday afternoon, the annual Con- 
vention of Young Churchmen was held, 
and Miss Helen Thomas was re-elected 
president for another year. Miss Ann 
Shuford, of Fletcher, was elected vice- 
president, and Miss Betsy Barber, of 
Morganton, secretary. A steering com- 
mittee of three young people was elect- 
ed to assist and advise in the planning 



of the 1947 Camp. They were Miss 
Mary Turner, Hendersonville, Miss 
Barbara Chandler, Asheville, and Miss 
Thomas. 

It was announced that copies of the 
Song Book of the Young Churchmen, 
which have been printed, are on sale for 
10^ per copy. They may be obtained 
from Miss Helen Thomas, 401 N. Mari- 
etta St., Gastonia, N. C. 

Following the meeting of the Conven- 
tion, the Youth Commission met in- 
formally and set August 13 as the date 
for the next meeting of the Youth Com- 
mission. This meeting will be held in 
Morganton at 10 A. M. 



RECONSTRUCTION AND 
ADVANCE FUND 

The National Council reports that up 
to May 1, they have received a total 
of $6,805,872 towards the goal of 
$8,800,000. The National Council 
states that the record to date reveals 
cause for both encouragement and con- 
cern. There have been individuals, 
parishes, and diocese which have re- 
sponded with sacrificial loyalty. Others 
have not as yet given full support to 
this Reconstruction and Advance Fund. 
They ask that every Diocese and every 
Parish continue its effort until it can 
honestly feel that it is carrying its share 
of the total load. 

"The suffering and starving people 
of the world call to us. The war shat- 
tered churches, hospitals, and schools 
in the Philippines and China call to us. 
Those who depend upon the Church to 
build the foundations upon which a 
lasting peace can alone be built call to 
us. The unprecedented opportunities 
to advance the cause of Christ in the 
world call to us. We need all the 
$8,800,000 and more, to answer these 
calls. Far more than money we need 
an awakened Church membership 
which will, with a keen sense of respon- 
sibility, go forth to meet the crisis of 
our day with a determination to make 
Christ known among the peoples of 
all nations. It is late, but not too late, 
to win a great victory." 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Dr. Richard G. Stone, Ph.D., President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

10th, 11th, 12th grades of High School and 
two years college work. All academic courses 
fully accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

For Catalogue and Book of Views write 

E. F. Stoughton, Business Manager 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



MEMORIAL WINDOWS 

-By- 

HIGH POINT GLASS & 

DECORATIVE CO. 

A. W. Klemme, Pres., Mgr. 
High Point North Carolina 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 

Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



NEWS FROM NW. N. C. 

(Continued from Page 4) 

Mary's, Blowing Rock, where he has 

been holding services during the past 

winters. 

* * * * * 

St. John's Church, Valle Crucis, has 
just been re-covered. Through the un- 
tiring efforts of Mr. Robert Yates, suf- 
ficient funds were raised to buy the ma- 
terial, and volunteer labor from around 
the church put the roof on. St. John's 
is the oldest of our churches in this sec- 
tion, having been built in 1862 under 
the direction of the Rev. William Skiles 
who had come to the mission field to 
work under Bishop Ives. A Sunday 
School and Church services are now be- 
ing planned for St. John's. 



school for the training of rural workers 
at Valle Crucis this summer. The school 
opened June 17 with a two weeks orien- 
tation course. Following this, there will 
be field work in surrounding communi- 
ties in Western North Carolina. 

The student body consists of clergy 
and women workers. At the close of 
the school, there will be a week of con- 
ferences in conjunction with the clergy 
Conference of Mountain Workers. 



SOUTHERN RURAL CHURCH 

LEADERSHIP SCHOOL 

OPENS 

The Province of Sewanee, the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina, and the 
Board of Domestic Missions of the Na- 
tional Council, are cooperating in a 



PRINTED WITHOUT COMMENT 

I am twenty-five cents. 

I am not on speaking terms with the 

butcher. 

I am too small to buy a quart of ice 

cream. 
I am not large enough to buy a box of 

candy. 
I am too small to buy a ticket for the 

movie. 
I am hardly fit for a top, but believe me, 

when I go to Church on Sunday I 

am considered SOME money. 

(Reprinted from the Diocesan News, 
Diocese of Lexington.) 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



10 






RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH 
CAROLINA FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS 



On Assessment 

Made Paid 
540.00 $ 225.00 
144.00 24.00 

48.00 

540.00 270.00 
72.00 18.00 

72.00 

120.00 50.00 
180.00 75.00 

144.00 

120.00 

144.00 60.00 

48.00 

60.00 60.00 

270.00 270.00 

240.00 

270.00 

72.00 72.00 
24.00 18.00 



January, 1946, to June 15. 1946 

On 
PARISHES Made 

Asheville. Trinity $ 2,236.! 



Asheville, St. Mary's 360.00 

Asheville, St. Matthias' 146.40 

Biltmore, All Souls" 1,460.00 

Brevard. St. Philip's 189.10 

Flat Rock, St. John's 183.00 

Fletcher, Calvary 402.60 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 737.22 

Hendersonville, St. Jarnes' 640.50 

Hickory, Ascension 244.00 

Lenoir, St. James' 475.80 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 292.80 

Marion. St. John's 161.04 

Morganton. Grace 1,098.00 

Rutherfordton. St. Francis' 624.64 

Tryon, Holy Cross 793.00 

Waynesville, Grace 134.20 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 100.80 



4 pportionment 
Paid 
$ 1,110.32 
193.34 



55.37 
682.23 
117.26 

T31T.80 

326.05 
325.00 
250.00 
302.78 
103.10 
79.68 
922.11 
5.75 

TT.OO 

82.35 



30.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
30.00 
18.00 

6.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
60.00 

5.00 



12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



5.00 
10.00 



10.00 
30.00 



10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
10.00 



10.00 
30.00 



ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Arden. Christ Church 

Asheville, The Redeemer 

Asheville, St. Luke's 

Asheville. Trinity Chapel 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 

Black Mountain, St. James 

Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. . 

Canton. St. Andrew's 

Cullowhee, St. David's 

Edneyville. St. Paul's 

Franklin. St. Agnes' 

Franklin. St. Cyprian's 

Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 

Glendale Springs, Holy Trin. 

High Shoals, St. John's 

Highlands. Incarnation 

Hot Springs. St. John's 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 

Lincoln. Woodside, Our Saviour 
Little Switzerland. Resurrection . 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 

Murphy, Messiah 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 

Saluda, Transfiguration 

Shelby, The Redeemer 

Sylva, St. John's 

Todd. St. Matthew's 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 

Dutch Creek 



79.30 
37.82 
22.57 
45.14 
19.52 
15.25 

152.50 
63.44 

103.70 
7.93 
22.57 
91.50 
15.25 
19.52 
15.25 
19.52 

152.50 
14.64 
76.86 
18.30 
18.91 
30.50 
18.30 
19.52 
18.30 
81.74 
26.84 
7.32 
7.93 

231.80 
6.10 



70.00 
53.56 
29.75 
6.82 
7.00 
17.26 



28.60 

~Yf.34 

23.01 

7.81 

19.52 

152.50 

"To'.OO 

""lT.oi 



26.90 
19.52 
18.30 
81.74 
26.33 

'To". 00 

96.60 



12.00 
10.00 

5.00 
10.00 

8.00 

8.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 

6.00 
12.00 
10.00 

6.00 



5.00 



10.00 



UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Asheville, Grace 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 

Boone, St. Luke's 

Cashiers. Good Shepherd 

Edneyville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Linville. All Saints 

Morganton, St. Mary's 

Penland, Good Shepherd 

Rutherfordton, Missions 

Upward, St. John Baptist 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 

Cherokee. St. Francis 



24.40 
76.86 
18.30 
15.00 
10.37 

9.76 
24.40 
18.30 
30.50 

7.93 
61.00 
12.81 
10.00 



$3, 683.00 $1,356.00 



GRAND TOTAL $12,058.95 



28.00 
32.29 
18.30 



15.50 
46.38 
7.93 
34.71 
1*9.48 



$6,018.66 



11 



HELP FOR OVERSEAS CHURCHES 

The Episcopal Church will give $617,- 
132 to aid sister Churches in Europe and 
Asia this year. Two quarterly install- 
ments have already been paid. 



and which is used principally in the 
Church's missionary program. It is be- 
lieved that the amount presented will be 
well over a million dollars. 



WOMEN GIVE $1,000,000 

Meeting at the same time as the Epis- 
copal General Convention, the Woman's 
Auxiliary Triennial Meeting brings dele- 
gates from every part of the world. 
During the Convention, which runs from 
September 10 to 20, and which will be 
housed at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, the Woman's Auxiliary will pre- 
sent its United Thank Offering, which 
is gathered during the past three years, 



ROY H. McDDFFIE Jr. 

Specializing in 

* Estate Tax Analysis 
"Business Insurance 

* Retirement Income 

* Endowments 

401-2-3 Public Service Bldg. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Phone 7167-7168 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

THE CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 



12 




SCHOOL 
ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



AUGUST, 1946 



NO. 5 




OUjurrijman 

Box 169 Asheville, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. F. M. Tongue Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



how we can work together for the great- 
er good of the Church of Western North 
Carolina. 



As to the Presbyterians 

Human curiosity being what it is, all 
sorts of speculation is rife as to what 
will happen at Philadelphia in regard to 
the overtures toward union with what 
is popularly spoken of as the Northern 
Presbyterian Church. Some are so op- 
timistic in one direction that they are 
expecting by at least September 20 that 
we will all be Presbypalians; others have 
made tentative arrangements for lodg- 
ings in the Vatican, if anything of the 
sort happens. 

While we are sorry to dash these 
hopes and fears the solid fact remains 
that nothing definite can happen before 
the meeting of the Lambeth Conference, 
the body to which is referred by cour- 
tesy, anything in the nature of drastic 
action by any segment of the Anglican 
Communion. So the question is a far 
larger one than as to what is done or 
said at the General Convention of the 
Episcopal Church. The answer as to 
what of binding character will be en- 
acted at Philadelphia is "nothing". 

So let us drive away these bogey man 
fears and get down to the question of 



Chit -Chat 

Sometimes the casual conversations on 
porches and in parlors at summer re- 
sorts are revealing. And sometimes 
these revelations are rather shocking to 
Christian sensibilities. 

Now here in the South most people 
of the type able to enjoy a vacation have 
some sort of Christian affiliation. Yet 
to hear them talk one would think that 
religion was something for which each 
individual had his own safety-deposit 
box, which he kept locked up in the 
vault of the Church of his allegiance. 
To hear the problems of today's troubl- 
ed world discussed, sounds as if all that 
people desired was to get what they 
could snatch for themselves with no re- 
gard for human misery and suffering, 
and that they believed that there was no 
possibility that the precepts of the Naz- 
arene could have any but the shadowiest 
acceptance. 

This unfortunate condition is due to 
the time-lag between the vision of the 
Church of a generation ago and that of 
today. Then it was perfectly possible 
to remind the pulpit that if matters af- 
fecting human society were touched 
upon, no pay-check would be forthcom- 
ing. The clergy in effect was signed up 
to "yellow dog" contracts. Now all that 
is past, and the real lay leaders in our 
congregations want a spiritual guide who 
will interpret to them the times in which 
they live. One of these days this atti- 
tude will trickle down to the rank and 
file, and men and women will see that 
selfish and self-seeking Christians are 
in reality atheists. In the meantime let 
all right minded people lift up their 
voices to hasten the dav. 



Our Cover 

Our cover picture this month is of the 
Chapel at Christ School, Arden. The 
Rev. Gale D. Webbe is Chaplain. 



The Four Rs. 

The Church School adds another R to the three usually considered as 
basic to education. The fourth R is RELIGION. The state supported 
school is not allowed to include Religion in its curriculum. 

Those who work for Church Schools and sacrifice to maintain them 
believe that religion gives meaning to education as it does to the rest of life. 

The reason why any part of our life is to be directed towards God is 
the reason why all of it should be so turned. It may be said that religion 
interprets knowledge, pointing out that knowing the truth makes one free. 
God's service is perfect freedom. Religion also integrates the "broken 
shafts" of knowledge tracing their origin to the fountain of all wisdom, 
the "One God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, And of 
all things visible and invisible." 

From the Church Schools have come many of our leaders whose under- 
standing of their duty to God and country has helped to hold before us the 
vision of God's kingdom coming on earth as it is in heaven. 

Robert E. Gribbin, Bishop. 



Christian Education: Whither Bound? 

By The Rev. Vesper Ottmer Ward, S. T. M. 

We are witnessing the end of the Christian Era. No longer dare the Church 
be content with the function of maintaining a sanction for a secular order of 
life; because the Church can no more serve God and Mammon than can the 
saint. 

If the Church is ever to come into her real heritage, necessarily she must 
rediscover a technique of Christian Education that will enable her members, 
both young and old, to grasp the full significance of her heritage. She must 
efficiently interpret her genius to Herself. She must inspire loyalty and devotion 
to her Redeeming Life. All serious attempt to achieve this end was abandoned 
when we turned over the educational process to secular control. The key to the 
paganism of modern culture, in the main, is to be found in the secular character 
of the educational procedure. 

Secularism in modern education has created a climate which blasts Christian 
idealism in the bud. This process cannot be counteracted by the teaching of Bible 
Stories, Church History, and the contents of the Prayerbook. Christian Education 
begins with a changed heart. It is complete only when the whole nervous system 
of an individual functions harmoniously in terms of Christian Idealism. Christian 
attitudes are contagious. A Christian teacher of English, of Civics, is more crucial 
to a program of Christian Education than a department of Sacred Studies. Our 
whole system of Sunday Schools, Week-Day Schools and Church Educational 
Institutions must be revamped and remotivated if ever we are to be able to 
impart the Christian faith to the Church's youth. It is time that all Churchmen 
who are interested in Christian Education began to think in terms of an organic, 
an expressive, and an adequate educational procedure, manned and controlled by 
the Church and functioning in such manner as to mold the Church's children into 
intelligent and loyal members of the Christian Community including the family 
and the parish. The Body of Christ will be paralyzed until this goal is attained. 

.... reprinted from "The Pacific Churchman." 



Christchurch School 

Christchurch, Virginia 

Christchurch School for boys was 
founded in 1921, one of seven schools 
sponsored by the diocese of Virginia. It 
is located on the Rappahannock River 
in Tidewater, Virginia, about 17 miles 
from Chesapeake Bay. The school 
grounds consist of ninety-five acres of 
rolling land, partly open and partly 
wooded. Although in the country the 
school is readily accessible by bus to 
Norfolk. Richmond, Washington and 
Baltimore. 

The Lower School covers the work of 
grades seventh through ninth, and the 
Upper School carries on through the 
twelfth grade. With an enrollment lim- 
ited to sixty boys, classes are small, and 
individual attention can be given, with- 
out regimentation. 

The life at school is one of simplicity. 
Each boy makes his own bed, sweeps his 
own cubicle, and they all take turns in 
sweeping the halls and classrooms, and 
in partial waiting on the table. 

In athletics the school has teams in 
six-man football, basketball and base- 
ball, with games scheduled with neigh- 
boring schools. Intramural sports con- 
sist of soccer, softball, tennis and such. 
In the fall and spring the school water- 
front is the scene of much activity in 
sailing, swimming and crabbing. The 
school maintains six sailboats, six skiffs, 
and a motor boat. Further recreation 
is found in fishing, hunting, and in the 
school workshop. 

The school curriculum is the standard 
college preparatory course with each 
boy taking English grammar, composi- 
tion and literature, mathematics, science 
and history. The atmosphere is that 
of a Christian community, with even- 
ing chapel services held six nights a 
week in the school Chapel. On Sundays 
the boys attend old Christ Church. Two 
classes a week in Sacred Studies are a 
feature of each boy's schedule. 



Patterson School For 
Boys 

Legerwood, North Carolina 

As September 3, 1946, the opening of 
another school year at Patterson School 
approaches, an outline of our work and 
aims is in order. Founded by the Hon. 
and Mrs. Samuel Legerwood Patterson, 
who bequeathed to the Church their an- 
cestral home and 1,300 acres estate of 
fertile farm and forest land for the pur- 
pose of providing worthy boys with an 
academic education, to which would be 
added training in agriculture and me- 
chanics, under spiritual auspices, it has 
for the thirty-five years of its history 
been shaped by these ideals. 

As a Church School, Patterson holds 
religious training and character devel- 
opment to be the most important reason 
for its existence, and the basis of the 
spiritual, cultural, and vocational ways 
of life. Religion is not taught as a sep- 
arate subject or in a particular place, 
but permeates every phase of the life of 
the school. 

The Junior and Senior high school 
course, consisting of grades 7 through 12, 
is accredited by the State of North Caro- 
lina, and prepares the student for col- 
lege or university if that is his desire. 
Scholastic standards are high; yet, be- 
cause of carefully chosen teachers, small 
classes, and supervised study periods, 
boys often learn better than in public 
school. 

Patterson stresses a well-rounded edu- 
cation for life, which includes learning 
to earn a living and to live with others 
in a democracy. Class work in agricul- 
ture, industrial arts, and typing is sup- 
plemented by practical work on the 
farm, about the school, and in the of- 
fice. Each boy carries his share of the 
daily work and learns by so doing. The 
income from the farm serves to hold 
board and tuition charges to their pres- 
ent moderate level. 

Opportunities for hiking, mountain 
climbing, fishing, hunting, and swim- 
ming abound, while baseball, basketball, 
and other sports are enjoyed on the ath- 




Horner Hall, Administration Building at Appalachian School 



letic field. The school boasted a win- 
ning basketball team this past season 
and all inter-school contests in either 
sport were characterized by fair play 
and an excellent spirit. 

Thus, with a balanced program of 
worship, study, work, and play, Patter- 
son provides an atmosphere designed to 
develop the best in a boy's life and to 
prepare him to be a well-equipped, 
Christian citizen and leader in his com- 
munity. 



Appalachian School 

Penland, North Carolina 

Schooling, like any business or domes- 
tic occupation, is not particularly a 
series of crises or a succession of notable 
incidents. In fact it is rather the return 
of trivial rounds and common tasks. 
However, in these our lives are strength- 
ened and built towards the full par- 
ticipation of life in the Kingdom of 
God. As ordinarily conceived any 
home, but more especially the Christian 
home, is a haven of refuge and rest 
from the turmoils of life as we create 
them. It is for this reason that the 



Church has always guided her children, 
young and old; and nurtured with par- 
ticular solicitude those who are for any 
reason displaced from the situations 
ordinarily considered normal. It is with 
this in mind that the Diocese through 
the facilities of Appalachian School of- 
fers the combined advantages of home 
and school for children of the first seven 
grades; aged six to twelve. Many fami- 
lies of modest means from numerous 
southern states avail themselves of these 
opportunities. For this reason our en- 
rollment has to be limited in order that 
we can give the necessary careful super- 
vision which makes for the children the 
intimate relationship between environ- 
ment and school life which is one of the 
objectives of parent-teacher associa- 
tions. 

Our material and spiritual needs are 
commenserate with the times, but it is 
not within the scope of these remarks 
to make any appeal. Those interested 
can easily communicate with Appala- 
chian School in order to be informed 
how they may assist. As ever we solicit 
your continued prayers and assistance 
in order that we may give to the Church 
of our best. 



Sewanee 

By Father Sill 



The state of Tennessee was formed 
originally out of North Carolina terri- 
tory, and one of the main streams of 
travel from one state to the other in the 
past, as at present, was in following the 
course of the French Broad River. The 
establishment of the Church in Ten- 
nessee was promoted by the first two 
bishops of North Carolina, Bishops 
Ravenscroft and Ives, in their visits to 
Tennessee along this route of travel 100 
years and more ago. Bishop James H. 
Otey was the first bishop of Tennessee, 
a Virginian, though a graduate of the 
North Carolina University, and a dis- 
ciple of Bishop Ravenscroft. Bishop 
Leonidas Polk, a North Carolinian, also 
a student at the University, but grad- 
uating from West Point, became the first 
bishop of Louisiana. It was decided by 
these two bishops, with others, clergy 
and laymen, that there should be a 
Church college and training school for 
the ministry in the Southern States, 
which resulted after preliminary confer- 
ences, in a meeting at a place, now 
known as Sewanee, on the Cumberland 
plateau. This was in 1860, a corner 
stone of a building being laid October 
10th by Bishop Polk, with a large num- 
ber of persons present. $500,000 had 
been subscribed towards starting the 
college. 

On account of the Civil War, in which 
Bishop Polk, as a general in the Con- 
federate army, lost his life, it was not 
until the fall of 1868 that his and others' 
dream of a college was realized. Then 
nine students met with their teachers in 
a frame building at the place above 
mentioned. 

Now the college, officially called the 
University of the South, has a capacity 
for 325 students in the Liberal Arts and 
Science Schools, for 40 in the Theologi- 
cal School, and for 200 boys in the 
Sewanee Military Academy, a prep 
school. Many fine buildings have been 



erected, of native sandstone, halls, dor- 
mitories, library, chapel, etc., with at- 
tractive campus settings. There is a 
high tower, a part of the library build- 
ing. The property consists of 10,000 
acres, on the western rim of which one 
looks down on an expansive, rich, agri- 
cultural country. 

The university is owned by 22 South- 
ern dioceses, of which ours is one,three 
trustees from our diocese being elected 
by the diocesan convention, each serv- 
ing a three year term. The present 
trustees are: The Rev. A. Rufus Mor- 
gan, Mr. Fred Lykes, and Dr. W. E. 
Wilmerding. 

We have at present one clergyman in 
the diocese, a graduate of the Theologi- 
cal School, and no doubt others, graduat- 
ed of the college. We should know 
about our University. An opportunity 
is given each year on Theological Sun- 
day or otherwise to make an offering 
towards its support. 

The Liberal Arts college of Sewanee 
is small in number of students, as com- 
pared with many other colleges to-day. 
Its ideals are that of a college, not of 
over 500 students, where "all shall be 
qualified for college work .... an in- 
stitution of higher learning where a stu- 
dent body, qualified for academic work 
would go far to lift the intellectual level 
of the South, to strengthen the South 
intellectual and moral vitality, and to 
provide a finer intellectual and moral 
leadership .... The University was 
founded upon the concept of religion 
and spiritual ideals at the heart of the 
educational process. There never was 
a time when there was a greater need or 
a greater chance for an institution that 
stands squarely by the principle of re- 
ligion in education and of the eternal 
value and nobility of spiritual ideals." 
These are recent words of Dr. Alexan- 
der Guerry, the Vice Chancellor of 
Sewanee, and its Executive Head. 




WEBSTER NEW RECTOR AT 
RUTHERFORDTON 

The Rev. Ralph K. Webster, formerly 
a missionary to Puerto Rico, has accept- 
ed a call to become rector of St. Francis' 
Church, Rutherfordton, and began his 
duties there on July 1. Father Web- 
ster, who was born in Warsaw, New 
York, spent most of his early life in 
Corning, N. Y. 

Before entering the General Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1940, Fr. Webster 
was for a time a volunteer lay mission- 
ary at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 
San Juan, Puerto Rico. He was ordain- 
ed Deacon in February, 1943, at Corn- 
ing, N. Y., and to the Priesthood in 
October, 1943, at Christ School, Arden, 
N. C, where he acted as Master and 
Assistant Chaplain during the school 
year 1943-1944. Fr. Webster received 
the degree of Bachelor of Sacred Theo- 
logy from the General Seminary in May, 
1944. He married the former Harriett 
Virginia Farnsworth, of Horse Shoe, 
N. C, in 1944. 

Fr. Webster went to Puerto Rico in 



July, 1944, to organize and build a vo- 
cational and agricultural school for 
mountain boys, which was officially op- 
ened in August of the following year. 
Its name is Colegio Agricultura de San 
Jose and is officially accredited by the 
Insular Department of Education. 



Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



A SPANISH SAINT — "MOTHER 
OF CARMEL", by E. Allison Peers, 
Morehouse-Gorham Co. 

Professor Peers, after his intense 
study of the Spanish mystics of the six- 
teenth century, is one of those best fitted 
to interpret them for us. And in Teresa 
of Avila he has chosen one who should 
be a Saint for common people. She was 
never technical in her approach to God. 
Though of good family, her formal edu- 
cation was not carried beyond average 
for her time and station. In her writ- 
ings she admits her inability to express 
herself. 

Another part of her charm is the 
freshness which she combines with her 
simplicity. Her writings were never in- 
tended for publication. Some grew out 
of a diary which one of her early con- 
fessors advised her to keep. Others 
were simply her instructions to the nuns 
of the small convents which she founded. 
Essentially her devotional works are 
simply the record of one who has been 
with God herself. There is never the 
suggestion of the studied art of one who 
advises others of the way to a goal he 
has not reached. 

Of course not all parts of "Mother of 
Carmel" will be of equal interest to 
church people of today. We may care 
little for the number of convents which 
she founded, or the ecclesiastical politics 
of Spain. But Teresa the Saint, who 
without any formal training in theology 
but by love and devotion alone found 
her way to God, and Teresa the Writer 
who has told what she found, these will 
always mean much to Christians who 
truly desire holy lives. 



Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



come from the parish church." You 
ask a good question when you want to 
know what you can do for your Parish. 
May many others ask it and mean it! 



What Can I Do For My Parish 
Church? 

Once a young Japanese student was 
being examined for Holy Orders. One 
pf his examiners said to him "Suppose 
a man were to ask you 'What must I do 
to be saved?', what would you say to 
him?" The student is said to have 
promptly replied: "I would look him 
straight in the eye and say, Mister, do 
you mean it?" 

Some people do ask the question 
"What can I do for my Parish?" Some 
of them mean it. 

The Office of Instruction, Prayer 
Book, page 291, gives a good general 
answer. It says your duty as a member 
of the Church is: 1. — to follow Christ. 
2. — -to worship God every Sunday in his 
Church. 3. — to work. 4. — to pray. 
5. — to give for the spread of his king- 
dom. 

Number 1 is so general that it includes 
all the others. Number 2 certainly in- 
cludes number 4, and, for some people, 
it would also include number 3. If the 
old Latin proverb, "Orare est laborare" 
to pray is to work, is true, then, number 
4 would include number 3. 

Since no two people are alike, and, 
since your Parish may be a peculiar 
Parish (all of them are peculiar), it may 
be well for you to talk this matter over 
with your rector. In any case, every 
parish gives every member an oppor- 
tunity to do, at least, one of the five 
things mentioned above. It just is not 
true to say "My Parish does not give 
me anything to do." 

Some people not only serve their par- 
ish churches with gladness while they 
are alive, but remember them in their 
wills in the hope that they will be per- 
petuated for generations to come. Ask 
your rector about this. 

Sidney Dark, who edited "The Church 
Times" (London) for sixteen years, 
says: "If religion is to have a new in- 
vigorating influence — its inspiration will 



Youth News 

By Ann Shuford 

The Young Peoples Service League 
of Grace Church, Morganton, recessed 
after their June 2nd meeting for the 
summer season. Their full program of 
activities will be resumed in the fall 
with the beginning of school. Several 
picnics and other social events have 
been planned for this summer. Though 
their regular meetings have been re- 
cessed for awhile the young people will 
not be idle in their parish. The Junioi 
Altar Guild has taken over the respon- 
sibility of all Altar work each Sunday 
as they have in the past for the summer 
season. In addition to giving the Senior 
Altar Guild a rest this work will add 
much to the experience of these young 
people. 

The Young Churchman's Club of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, held its first 
formal meeting on July 14th since the 
new officers were elected. The officers 
for this year are Miss Sarah Baldwin, 
President; Floyd Finch, Vice President; 
William Bowles, Secretary; and Charles 
Jones, Treasurer. Miss Helen Thomas, 
President of the Diocesan Youth, was 
present for this meeting and spoke brief- 
ly. She asks that all the young people 
of the Diocese send to her any sugges- 
tions or ideas they think might help her 
when she attends the Youth Conven- 
tion in Philadelphia in September. The 
young people of Calvary are now plan- 
ning to help in many ways with a Parish 
bazaar to be given on August 15th in 
the Parish House by the Woman's 
Auxiliary to raise funds to be used in 
building a new Parish House. 

About fifty young people and adult 
leaders from Edneyville, Bat Cave, Up- 
ward, and Hendersonville, had a joint 
meeting at St. James, Hendersonville, 
Sunday evening, June 16, to hear Dr. 
George Bond from Bat Cave speak on 
his plans for medical care for all cora- 



8 



munities in this area. The need for this 
has been great and the first big step has 
been taken with the opening of the Val- 
ley Clinic at Bat Cave earlier this sum- 
mer. He expressed his hope to have 
more posts scattered around this part of 
Western North Carolina so our country- 
people can have immediate medical care. 
Young Dr. Bond was a member of the 
St. James Service League in Hender- 
sonville while attending high school here. 

After the meeting the group enjoyed 
refreshments and group singing. 

The youth of Banner Elk are cooper- 
ating with all the Church people there 
to get organized adult and youth church 
work started. At present evening ser- 
vices are held on Sundays. Here's wish- 
ing all the good church people, both 
young and old, success. 



DEL NERO HONORED AT SHELBY 

Members of the Woman's Auxiliary of 
the Church of the Redeemer, Shelby, 
entertained on June 27 at a reception 
for the Rev. and Mrs. Jose Del Nero, 
of Brazil. Mr. Del Nero is spending 
the summer in the Diocese, assisting the 
Rev. Grant Folmsbee of Lincolnton. 
Mr. Del Nero made a short talk about 
Brazil, his native country, with particu- 
lar emphasis on the work of the Epis- 
copal Church there. 



NEW PRESIDENT NAMED FOR 
ST. MARY'S 

Dr. Richard G. Stone of Atlanta, Ga., 
has accepted the presidency of St. 
Mary's School and Junior College, Ra- 
leigh. Dr. Stone succeeds Mrs. Ernest 
Cruikshank who is retiring after serving 
for 14 years. 

St. Mary's new president was a Cap- 
tain in the Army, attached to the Securi- 
ty and Intelligence Division of the 
Fourth Service Command. Before en- 
tering the service, he was professor of 
History and Economics at Converse 
College, Spartanburg, S. C. 



SAINT MAHY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, Ph.D.. President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

10th, 11th, 12th grades of High School and 
two years college work. All academic courses 
fully accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

For Catalogue and Book of Views write 

E. F. Stoughton, Business Manager 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



MEMORIAL WINDOWS 

-By- 

HIGH POINT GLASS & 

DECORATIVE CO. 

A. W. Klemme, Pres., Mgr. 
High Point North Carolina 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 

Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



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Women's Auxiliary 

News 



To the Women of the Auxiliary, 

It is with the greatest pleasure that I 
send greetings through the pages of the 
Highland Churchman to each woman 
of the Auxiliary, to those whom I know, 
and to each one I have yet to meet. 

There are great tasks ahead of us. 
They can be met only as each and every 
woman seeks a deeper knowledge of our 
Lord and Saviour and through a per- 
sonal awareness of His sufficiency for 
herself, her family, the Church and the 
world, lifts her eyes to the vision, not 
only of the world as it might be, but as 
it must be. We cannot rest content; 
still waters only stagnate and poison; 
we must press onward toward a world as 
God has planned it, but can only achieve 
as we submit our wills to His, and work 
in accordance with His plan. 

The great Triennial meeting of our 
Woman's Auxiliary will meet in Phila- 
delphia September 10 to 20. It is your 
meeting, will you not pray daily now 
and during the meeting for your dele- 
gates and for all the women there, as 
well as for the General Convention. 
Watch the papers and follow what is 
done. Personal reports of the delegates 
will be brought to you at the District 
meetings in October. 

Lucy T. Fletcher 
President. 



Visit our complete book store at 
KANUGA LAKE 

Open daily until September 1 . 

Complete line of Church books 

and supplies. 

MOREHOUSE-GORHAM 
CHURCH BOOK STORE 

New York Milwaukee 



10 



BIBLE SCHOOL HELD AT 
VALLE CRUCIS 

A very successful Bible School has 
just been completed at Holy Cross 
Church, Valle Crucis. Twenty-five child- 
ren were enrolled under the tutelage of 
the Rev. and Mrs. Kenneth Robinson 
and Miss Elizabeth Sumner, all of whom 
are students at the Southern Rural 
Church Leadership School. 

A ten-day preaching mission was also 
held, with priests and other students 
from the School helping Father Leach. 

A successful Bible School was also 
held at St. John the Baptist, Lower 
Valle Crucis. Due to the interest al- 
ready generated by the renovation of the 
Church, and with the Bible School, regu- 
lar Sunday services are now being con- 
ducted. 

St. Anthony's, Dutch Creek, is hold- 
ing a Bible School with twenty children 
enrolled. It is hoped that this, too, will 
lead to the formation of a regular Sun- 
day School. 



CHRIST SCHOOL GIVEN LARGE 
TRACT 

A gift of 509 acres of land to Christ 
School, Arden, by Mrs. Douglas Nye, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wet- 
more, founders of the school, has been 
announced by the trustees. 

The property represents all but about 
70 acres of the Wetmore estate and ad- 
joins the school. The deed was pre- 
sented at a meeting of the trustees on 
July 8, at which time four new members 
were added. They are: Wilson Cun- 
ningham, of Winston-Salem; Curtis 
Bynum, Kingsland Van Winkle and 
Mrs. Nye. 

It was also announced that the Dio- 
cese has deeded all of the property used 
by the school, except the plot on which 
the chapel stands, to the school, which 
is now "on its own". 

The report of the headmaster, Mr. 
David Harris, showed that the finances 
of the school, founded in 1900, are in 
excellent condition. An enrollment of 



140 boys has been received, and 200 
other applications were turned down. 

The campaign to raise funds for the 
erection of a gymnasium is progressing 
nicely. The sum of $6,000 has already 
been raised toward the fund, which is 
expected to reach $25,000 to $30,000. 

Officers of Christ School, Inc. are: 
The Rt. Rev. R. E. Gribbin, president; 
Mr. William M. Redwood, vice-presi- 
dent; Mr. H. AT Heywood, secretary- 
treasurer. 



CHURCH CONGRESS TO MEET 

The Western North Carolina Regional 
Church Congress will hold a meeting on 
Tuesday, October 8, at Trinity Church, 
Asheville, the Rev. J. P. Burke, Presi- 
dent, has announced. Speakers and 
subject will be announced later. Make 
a note of the date now! 



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11 



General Convention Meets 



The General Convention of the Epis- 
copal Church meets in Philadelphia on 
September 10th. When the Convention 
opens, the House of Bishops and the 
House of Deputies will be representing 
74 dioceses and 29 missionary districts 
of the Church. At the same time, the 
Woman's Auxiliary will hold its Trien- 
nial Meeting. In addition, most of the 
other organizations of the Church have 
scheduled a national meeting, to be held 
at some time during the ten days of the 
General Convention. The United Move- 
ment of the Church's Youth will meet 
September 13-15. 

Highlight of the General Convention 
this year will be the presence of the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most 
Rev. Geoffrey Francis Fisher, who will 
deliver a number of speeches at special 
dinners while the Convention is on. 



The two issues of major interest 
which will come before the Convention 
are the proposed union of the Episcopal 
and Presbyterian (Northern) Churches, 
and the proposed revision of the Mar- 
riage Canon. 

But this is not the only important 
business to be taken up. Our Presiding 
Bishop, the Most Rev. Henry St. George 
Tucker, has reached the canonical age 
for retirement, so it will be necessary to 
elect a new Presiding Bishop. The 
House of Deputies will fill the important 
post of president of the House. The 
program and budget of the Church for 
the three years ahead must be adopted. 
All in all, the 150 bishops and more than 
600 clerical and lay deputies at the 55th 
General Convention have many impor- 
tant things to come before them. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



{M£tghlan& 
CljttrcJjman 




GENERAL 

CONVENTION 

ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



OCTOBER, 1946 



NO. 6 




Box 169 Asheville. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, SOc a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. D. J. Stroup Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. W. H. Stewart Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. W. C. Leach. 



Again The Church 
Congress 

It is with great satisfaction that we 
note that a meeting of the regional 
Church Congress is planned at Trinity 
Church, Asheville to take place very 
shortly after this issue of The High- 
land Churchman is in your hands. 

Such a fine organization as the 
Church Congress needs no defense or 
eulogy from us. Suffice it to say that 
its presence in our midst will do more 
for our diocesan life than any one 
agency. However it must be remem- 
bered that the good done by a force 
that operates in the sphere of education 
matures slowly. We can not expect to 
see immediate results. Those who fur- 
ther the Church Congress are not ex- 
perts who claim to be able to diagnose 
and cure all diocesan ills. Instead they 
are pedagogues who open up to us 
vistas of a richer, fuller and happier 
Church life. Not that we believe that 
the diocese suffers from any serious ail- 
ments, acute or chronic. It is, however, 
most stimulating to know that we have 
in our midst an agency that acts like 
a vitamin to keep us sound and healthy. 



Peace 

It is with great sorrow that we find 
ourselves unable to shut our ears to the 
clamor of war talk, dinned into us over 
the radio and to a lesser extent reflected 
in the press. One thing is sure. If 
people make up their minds that a 
third world war is in the offing it will 
surely come. 

Our duty as Christians is clear. We 
must think and pray over the situation 
until we have confidence that the Master 
can lead the world into the ways of 
peace. The disturbing fact is that so 
many people are repeating statements 
the sources of which they can not verify. 

That the world is in a sad state no 
one can deny, but we should remember 
that we have the constructive duty of 
casting in our lot with those forces which 
believe that impatience, greed, ultra- 
nationalism etc., while very stubborn 
ills, can be cured and that the cure lies 
in the Christian religion. 



In Memoriam 

To many the passing from this world 
of Mrs. Hiram Richard Hulse will be a 
grievous loss. Mrs. Hulse has lived in 
Asheville for many years and while 
health prevented her from taking part 
in any strenous activities she yet made 
a wide circle of friends who were endear- 
ed to her because of the natural sweet- 
ness and wholesomeness of her nature. 
Just as since Bishop Hulse's death we 
have missed his visits to our diocese 
and friendly interest in us and our 
affiairs, so likewise we feel poorer be- 
cause we shall not again see Mrs. Hulse 
in this world. 

May her soul by the mercy of God 
rest in peace and may Light Perpetual 
shine upon her. 

Our Cover 

Our cover picture for this month is 
of the Church of the Redeemer, Craggy 
Road, Asheville. The church, situated 
on a bluff overlooking the French Broad 
River on the outskirts of Asheville, was 
built over fifty years ago by a physician 
from England. 




The Most Reverend and Right Honorable Geoffrey Francis 
Fisher, D. D., Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of All Eng- 
land and Metropolitan, attended the sessions of the General 
Convention of the Episcopal Church, which met in Philadelphia. 
The Archbishop was being entertained by various Church and 
educational organizations, in Philadelphia, New York, Prince- 
ton, Washington, Boston and elsewhere. The Archbishop is 
the 98th Archbishop of Canterbury. In the history of the 
Episcopal Church in the United States, this was but the second 
time an archbishop of Canterbury has visited its General Con- 
vention. 



Highlights From The Address of 
The Archbishop of Canterbury 

For the second time in history, an Archibishop of Canterbury is allowed to 
address your General Convention. I count it a very high privilege to be received 
by you in this way. 

. . . And first a word about the Church of England. From it, of course, orig- 
inated historically all the Churches of the Anglican Communion, sometimes by its 
active energies, sometimes as in this country in spite of its really deplorable in- 
advertence. But that genealogical tree no longer fits the situation. What matters 
is that spread over the world are at least thirteen autonomous, national Churches, 
all members of this Anglican Communion; and in addition, covering almost all the 



rest of the world are a large number of dioceses on the way to becoming national 
Churches, with their own established life, but still looking for final jurisdiction to 
a mother Church. Here is a great family of churches within the Holy Catholic 
Church, which for reasons I will refer to later has its own special task and respon- 
sibility within the whole task of the whole Church. 

... I need not, I think, expound to you what I mean by the Anglican Tradi- 
tion; for it is what you mean by it also. It has its strong Catholic element — which 
emphasizes the historic continuity and organized life of the Church, as the ap- 
pointed channel of the Divine Grace through Creed, Ministry and Sacraments. It 
lias its strong Evangelical element, which emphasizes Gospel before Church, per- 
sonal conversion before corporate expression of it, spiritual immediacy, the direct 
response to the Holy Spirit wherever He may breathe. It has its third strong 
element, not easy to give a name to, which acts as a watchdog of both the other 
elements and brings into our tradition a special element of intellectual integrity, of 
sobriety and moderation of judgment, of moral earnestness, an element which is as 
aware of what we do not know as of what we do, which does not wish to go beyond 
the evidence but to judge all things with a large and reasonable charity. No 
Anglican should be without something of all these elements. 

... It is because we are by the Grace of God what we are in the Anglican 
Communion that we have so important a part to play, as I think, in the difficult 
field of reunion. 

. . . What I wish to do is only to emphasize the importance of our position in 
this field and to give an illustration of it. The Church of England is in full com- 
munion with the Old Catholics in Europe, and in a relation not far short of full 
communion with some of the Orthodox Churches. That on the one side: on the 
other we are in communion with the Lutheran Episcopal Churches of Sweden and 
Finland. No other Communion but ours could be such a unifying influence. Owing 
to our position, at once Catholic and reformed, we can hold out hands of friendship 
in both directions and be interpeters of the one to the other. 

... As I have said, the Anglican Communion embraces many national Church- 
es, provincial in name or character and a large number of diocese not yet organized 
as sepaarte provinces or national Churches. They are spread all over the world. 
The name Anglican is already a misnomer; it indicates their remote origin; but 
it does not at all describe their present condition. They are indigenous Churches, 
not only here and in England and in the British dominions, but in India, China, 
Japan, Ceylon, Africa, East and West. Wherever they are, they stand for a 
particular tradition within the Holy Catholic Church of Christ; and until that 
tradition is taken up into a wider fellowship, they must cohere. 

. . . What is the final authority within our Communion: The Bible has its 
authority with us— but it does not stand alone. Tradition, the working out in 
history of the Christian faith, has its authority — but it does not stand alone. 
Empiricism, the living voice of today's thought and spiritual experience, has its 
authority, but it does not stand alone. The past has shown that any one of these, 
taken in isolation as the one authority, leads to confusion and loss. Each requires 
constant correction from the others. We believe that in each the Holy Spirit speaks 
to us, though in each what He would say may be misinterpreted by the fallibility 
of man. We rely upon the followship of the Holy Spirit . . . speaking to us through 
a fellowship of authorities. That is our unity. 

.. . . The Book of Common Prayer unites us not by the letter of it but because 
it represents the union of Scripture and Tradition and Empiricism which is the 
mark of our tradition. 



General Convention News 



OPENING SERVICE 

The Opening Service of the 55th 
General Convention, held in the Munic- 
ipal Auditorium at Philadelphia was 
impressive, well-managed and beautiful. 
The huge auditorium was filled with an 
estimated 14,000 persons. The stage 
had been transformed into a beautiful, 
artistic sanctuary which actually achiev- 
ed the atmosphere of a Cathedral. An 
Altar 16 feet long was surmounted by 
a Cross eight feet high, which was 
flanked by six Candlesticks, each six 
feet in height. Behind the Altar hung 
a beautiful red dossal, mixed with gold 
and blue, matching the frontal on the 
Altar itself. The entire floor of the 
Sanctuary down to the floor level of 
,the auditorium was covered with a 
beautiful red carpet. 

The procession was composed of more 
than 600 clergy from all parts of the 
world, followed by more than 150 
bishops, who, in turn, were followed by 
the Archbishop of the West Indies, the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, and the 
Presiding Bishop. 

Following the service of Morning 
Prayer, Presiding Bishop Tucker 
preached. His sermon was a plea for 
a genuine sense of stewardship on the 
part of people, whose possessions may 
be great or small, but are, none the 
less, gifts of God. 

At the Offertory, the Reconstruction 
and Advance Fund was presented by 
representatives of the Dioceses and 
Missionary Districts. The total was 
£7,057,919. 



GENERAL CONVENTION ELECTS 
LAYMAN PRESIDENT 

The election of Mr. Justice Owen J. 
Roberts as President of the House of 
Clerical and Lay Deputies of the Gen- 
eral Convention, a keen parliamentarian, 
with humor, judgment, absolute fairness 
and complete understanding of all that 
went on, marked the first time that a 
layman had been so elected. The late 
Frederic C. Morehouse was once made 



president pro tern, but no layman prev- 
iously has been placed in the chair by 
a regular election to the office. 

The Rev. Dr. C. Rankin Barnes was 
elected secretary of the House of 
Deputies, following the long service of 
the Rev. Franklin J. Clark, secretary 
also of the National Council. 



PRESBYTERIAN UNION DELAYED 

The proposed basis of union with the 
Presbyterian Church U.S.A. (commonly 
called the Northern Presbyterian 
Church) was delayed until the next 
General Convention. There were two 
reports, majority and minority, and 
both were received with expressions of 
appreciation. The Commission on Ap- 
proaches to Unity is continued, and it 
was asked to prepare a statement of 
faith and order which is in harmony 
with the Lambeth Quadrilateral. By 
this action, the General Convention 
stated its disapproval of the plan pro- 
posed in the majority report of the 
Commission. Greetings and gratitude 
for "brotherly courtesy" were extended 
to the Presbtyerian body, with the re- 
quest that its Department of Church 
Unity and Cooperation prepare a similar 
formulation. The Lambeth Conference 
of 1948 will be asked to set up a Stand- 
ing Committee on the reunion of 
Christendom to consider all specific ap- 
proaches to unity in which any Church 
of the Anglican Communion is con- 
cerned. 



Department of Promotion 

The Department of Promotion of the 
Diocese met at Trinty Church, Ashe- 
ville, on Wednesday, October 2 and 
passed a resolution as follows: 

Resolved that the Department of 
Promotion, in the furtherance of the 
Every Memer Canvas in the Diocese 
does offer its services to every parish 
and mission to inform and assist in its 
plans and work. 



Triennial Auxiliary 
Meeting Held 

Four thousand women of the Church 
attended their Triennial Meeting, made 
a great Corporate Communion of 
thanksgiving, and presented the United 
Thank Offering of $1,631,576.21, the 
largest such offering in its 60 year his- 
tory. The program of the Triennial was 
deeply spiritual in emphasis, with daily 
meditations, studies of the Christian 
faith, Home, Community, and World 
problems, as they sought truly to learn 
the mind of our Lord and to prepare 
to be His emissaries to a needy world 
in a crucial time. Women figured in 
the House of Deputies, also, when for 
the first time a woman, Mrs. Randolph 
Dyer, of the Diocese of Missouri, was 
seated as a lay deputy. 



New Canon On Holy 
Matrimony Passed 

The General Convention approved a 
new canon on Holy Matrimony, which 
some bishops have regarded as a liberal- 
ization of Church Law, while others say 
it is a "tightening". A canon that can 
be so described may leave something 
to be desired but the new canon cer- 
tainly places more responsibility upon 
the bishops, and provides that individual 
cases shall be judged upon their merits. 
Also it definitely represents an honest 
attempt to interpret the mind of our 
Lord applied to life as it is, rather than 
as it should be ideally. 



THE NEXT GENERAL CONVENTION 

The House of Deputies on Sept. 19th 
accepted the invitation of the Diocese of 
California to hold the Convention of 
1949 in San Francisco. It was provided 
that the Convention open on Monday, 
Sept. 26 and continue through Saturday, 
Oct. 8th, subject to change to another 
September date by the Presiding Bishop. 



NATIONAL YOUTH CONVENTION 
HOLDS FIRST MEETING 

Youth of the Church held their first 
national convention September 14 and 
15. Nearly 300 delegates and their 
adult advisors talked seriously of the 
problems of the world today; of youth's 
place and youth's work in the Church. 
They discussed and planned a program 
for youth and by youth, including par- 
ticipation in every phase of the Church's 
program for rehabilitation and advance, 
dedicated themselves to study of inter- 
racial attitudes and relations, pledged 
support to the World Council of 
Churches, approved a plan for wheat- 
less days to help feed the world's hungry, 
planned active cooperation in world re- 
lief, sent fraternal greetings to Christian 
youth in Japan, adopted a plan to pro- 
mote family prayer in homes every- 
where, approved of Christian Unity, 
and devoted their Youth Offering to 
training native Christian youth leader- 
ship in Japan. 

Pleading for inter-racial understand- 
ing, the magnetic and forceful Bishop 
of Honolulu, Harry S. Kennedy said: 
"We come to conventions and tinker 
with the machinery of the Church. We 
pass legislation, all of which is doubtless 
necessary, but until we change the 
hearts and minds of men, until we teach 
them by word and example that God 
has made of one blood all nations of 
men, we have failed." 



CHURCH GIVING NOT ENOUGH 

Dr. Lewis B. Franklin, Treasurer of 
the National Council, reported at the 
General Convention that the giving of 
Church-people has increased, but not 
nearly enough. The year 1945 showed 
an increase of 27 per cent over 1943, 
and expectations for 1946 show a fur- 
ther increase, but still we are giving 
only $1.25 per communicant per year 
for the General Church Program, which 
offers no reason for complacency or 
self-satisfaction. 



Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



Why Do We Worship God? 

This question was followed by two 
others: Why are you always urging us 
to make our communions? Does God 
want us to be continually bowing down 
to him? 

The Bible, especially the Psalms, is 
filled with the worship and praise of 
God. The Book of the Acts, the best 
history of the earliest Christian Church, 
says this about the worship of the ear- 
liest Christians: "And they, continu- 
ing daily with one accord in the temple, 
and breaking bread from house to 
house, did eat their meat with gladness 
and singleness of heart, Praising God 
and having favour with all the people." 
Our Lord, Himself, says "Thou shalt 
worship the Lord thy God." 

In Prayer Book language, we worship 
and praise Him" — for our creation, pres- 
ervation and all the blessings of this 
life; but above all, for thine inestimable 
love in the redemption of the world by 
our Lord Jesus Christ." 

We praise God chiefly, not so much 
because we love Him, though we do 
praise Him for that reason, and certain- 
ly not because we diminish His glory if 
we do not, but because He loves us and 
true worship will make us more lovable 
and more given to bringing forth good 
fruit. 

Our imperfections impede His love. 
True worship should help us to over- 
come these imperfections and give His 
love full sway with us. St. Paul says it 
is the goodness of God that leadeth us 
to a true and sound repentance. It is 
difficult, if not impossible, for a normal 
person to listen to and meditate upon 
the beautiful liturgy of the Church with- 
out, in some measure, being reminded 
of God's love and goodness. These re- 
minders should lead to repentance and 
reformation, and, these in turn, should 
make more lovable creatures. This is 
God's will for us. It was to this end 
that he created us. The sacraments 



supply the needed grace. Yes, God 
demands our worship, our bowings 
down and our risings up. It was not 
until the prodigal began to think of 
his father's house, his great possessions, 
his food and raiment and compared it 
to his own dire need that he could bring 
himself to a true and sound repentance. 
God cannot need anything that we 
can give, but we need to give it. When 
your rector urges you to worship he 
may have many motives for so doing, 
but, it could be that he loves you. 



Lackey Goes To Shelby 

The Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., son 
of the Rev. B. M. Lackey, of Lenoir, 
X. C, has taken up his work as Priest- 
in-charge of the Church of the Redeem- 
er, Shelby. Mr. Lackey has served for 
the past two years as curate at St. 
Johns' parish, Waterbury, Conn. 

Born in Raleigh on July 5, 1921, 
Lackey is a graduate of the University 
of Xorth Carolina and the Virginia 
Theological Seminary. At the Univer- 
sity of Xorth Carolina, he became a 
member of the University Band and 
Symphony as first flute soloist. He was 
a member of Phi Mu Alpha, honorary 
musical fraternity. At the Virginia 
Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Va., 
he was a member of the student council 
and president of the Senior Class of 
1944. 



NATIONAL DIOCESAN PRESS 
MEETS 

At the General Convention, in Phil- 
adelphia, the Xational Diocesan Press 
held its regular meeting. The Xational 
Diocesan Press is the organization of 
Diocesan editors. The Rev. G. Ralph 
Madson, of Albany, Ga., was re-elected 
president, and the Rev. Dudley J. 
Stroup, of Asheville, X. C, secretary. 
Attendance was the largest in the 
eight years of the history of the organ- 
ization. The Rev. Charles G. Leavell, 
of Morganton, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Promotion, was also present 
from Western Xorth Carolina. 



FollXlsbcG Leaves Folmsbee was minister of the Commun- 

j . | . ity Church, Fontana Dam, N. C, hav- 

i^inCOlntOn i ng gone t h e re in December, 1942. He 

The Rev. Grant Folmsbee, for the attended Syracuse University and is a 
past two years rector of St. Luke's graduate of Berkeley Divinity School, 
Church, Lincolnton, has resigned to New Haven, Conn, 
accept a call to Christ Church, Warrens- 
burg, and Christ Church, Lexington, While in Lincolnton, Mr. Folmsbee 
Missouri, both of which are in the Dio- taught Bible in the public schools of 
cese of West Missouri. the community and was active in civic 

Before going to Lincolnton, Mr. affairs. 



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Stroup Resigns 

The Rev. Dudley J. Stroup has re- 
signed as Priest-in-charge of the Church 
of the Redeemer and St. Luke's Church, 
Asheville, to accept a call as rector of 
the Church of the Epiphany, Rensselaer, 
New York. He will begin his new work 
there about November 1st. 

Father Stroup, who has been in Ashe- 
ville since his graduation from the 
General Seminary in 1944, is the son of 
the Rev. Samuel B. Stroup, rector of 
the Church of the Ascension, Hickory, 
and Mrs. Stroup. 

At the General Convention in Phil- 
adelphia in September, Fr. Stroup was 
elected Secretary of the National Dio- 
cesan Press, an organization composed 
of the editors of all Church papers in 
the United States. He has been the 
Editor of The Highland Churchman 
since May, 1945, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Convocation of Asheville since 
August, 1944, Youth Secretary of the 
Diocese, Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Regional Church Congress, a member 
of the Ecclesiastical Court, and a mem- 
ber of the Department of Promotion of 
the Diocese. 



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Book Review 

By Rev. J. 11. Rhys 



ANALYSIS OF OUR BELIEF: 

"The Idea of Christ in the Gospels, or 
God in Man" ; a critical essay by George 
Santayana. Charles Scribner's Sons, 
1946. 

For those interested in a bit of good 
reading, this is one of the best of the 
year. Santayana does not commit him- 
self to any article of belief, but he writes 
of the Creed of the Church as a state- 
ment of objective fact in order to analyse 
all its implications. 

First he considers three salient truths 
which the Church has affirmed about 
Christ, and shows how the Gospel rec- 
ord bears them out in His life. The 
effect of our Lord's consciousness that 
He was the Messiah and the Son of God 
and the Son of Man in His actions is 
described. Special attention is given to 
the effect on certain of His distinctive 
acts, such as His Parables, His Prayers, 
and His Passion. The first part of the 
book closes with a careful reconstruction 
of the Resurrection. 

The second part consists of an analy- 
sis of the traditional assumptions of 
our religion. This, while less instructive, 
deserves no less attention. The author 
traces the implications of these assump- 
tions without giving a definite conclus- 
ion. But no one approaching this book 
with Christian convictions will leave it 
without having reached a clearer under- 
standing of his Faith. 



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10 



Young Churchmen 

By Ann Shuford 

At the regular meeting of the Youth 
Commission of the Diocese of Western 
Xorth Carolina, held in Morganton on 
August 27, 1946, the following resolu- 
tions were adopted unanimously and 
were ordered presented to the Youth 
Convention in Philadelphia. 

1. Resolved that the Christian youth 
of our Church seriously consider and 
prepare themselves in politics and gov- 
ernment, regarding this vocation as an 
imperative life work for Christian men 
and women of our age. 

2. Resolved that each section (town 
or state) of our nation with a race 
problem, solve that problem using as 
a basic working principle the funda- 
mental law of Christian love. 

3. Resolved that an immediate goal 
for all our youth be more cooperation 
between themselves and the youth 
groups of all other churches for the 
promotion of greater harmony and 
understanding, and that there may be, 
according to God's Will, one working 
Body under one Head, Jesus Christ. 

Those present at the meeting were 
the Reverends Charles G. Leavell and 
D. J. Stroup, Misses Frances Lyman 
and Helen Thomas, president of the 
young people. The Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Chairman, presided. 

It was decided to redistrict the Dio- 
cese for the youth work. During the 
war years, due to travel difficulties, the 
Diocese was divided into six districts, 
but since this has been eased, it was 
felt that two districts would be sufficient. 
The two districts will be the same size 
and geographical area as the present 
Convocations. 

An all youth convention of the Dio- 
cese will be held annually. Further 
plans for the next meeting will be an- 
nounced later. 

Trinity League, of Asheville, now has 
two new counselors, Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
mon Lee. They have done much to 
improve the meetings. A poll was con- 
ducted to find the subjects most people 



were interested in. The young people 
are very interested in guild work, so 
they have formed a Junior Altar Guild. 
The Young Churchmen's Club, of 
Calvary, Fletcher, sponsored a square 
dance on August 30. Members of St. 
James', Hendersonville, Trinity, and 
Redeemer, Asheville, were invited to at- 
tend. Eighty-six young people were 
present to make a most successful eve- 
ning. 



SISTER HETHERINGTON AT MURPHY 

Sister Virginia Hetherington, Church 
Army worker who has been at Patterson 
School during the past two years, has 
taken up her work at Murphy, N. C. 
Sister Hetherington is well known in 
Western Xorth Carolina for her splendid 
work at Patterson School, and among 
the young people as counselor at the 
Young Churchmen's Camp each sum- 
mer. 



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11 



EMMETT GRIBBIN GOES 
TO KENYON 

The Rev. R. Emmett Gribbin, Jr., 
son of Bishop Gribbin, has taken the 
post of chaplain at Kenyon College, 
Gambier, Ohio, after serving for five 
years as student Chaplain at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. Kenyon 
College, which is 60 miles north of 
Columbus, Ohio, is a man's college sup- 
ported entirely by the Episcopal Church. 
At Kenyon, Mr. Gribbin will teach 
courses in the Bible, in addition to his 
duties as chaplain to the 500 students 
enrolled there, and as rector of the local 
parish. 

The Rev. Mr. Gribbin who is well 
known in Western North Carolina, is 
a graduate of the University of the 
South at Sewanee, Tenn., and of the 
General Theological Seminary, in New 
York. In Septemer, 1942, he married 
Miss Elsie Lawrence, daughter of the 



Rev. A. S. Lawrence, of Chapel Hill. 
iThey have two children, Alice and 
Robert Emmett, III. 



Convocation of Asheville 

The Conovation of Asheville held its 
fall meeting at the Church of the Re- 
deemer, Asheville, on September 24. 
The Rev. J. B. Sill spoke on his work 
at Diocensan Historiographer. The Rev. 
A. R. Morgan and the Rev. D. J. Stroup 
reported on the General Convention. 

At the business session, the Rev. J. H. 
Rhys, of Black Mountain, was elected 
Secretary-Treasurer, replacing the Rev. 
D. J .Stroup, who is leaving the Dio- 
cese. At the afternoon session, the 
Rev. G. D. Webbe read a paper on the 
Liturgical Movement, following which 
the Rev. A. R. Morgan spoke of the 
work of the Southern Rural Church 
Leadership School. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 




WOMAN'S 

AUXILIARY 

ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



NOVEMBER, 1946 



NO. 7 




QHjurrijman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. W. H. Stewart Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



A Task for the Woman's 
Auxiliary 

Years ago we heard the venerable 
Bishop Tuttle address a Woman's 
Auxiliary on the subject of Lydia of 
Thyatira, whom St. Paul encountered 
at Philippi and who offered her home 
to be used as his headquarters. Bishop 
Tuttle pointed out that Lydia was a 
business woman who acted as an agent 
for a firm in her native city famous for 
its manufacture of dyed garments. Her 
occupation and manner of life furnish 
an instance of the freedom bestowed 
upon women long ago. 

It is not a far cry from Lydia of Thy- 
atira to her counterpart wherever wom- 
en are employed in Western North 
Carolina. It is an inspiration to be out 
on the streets early and see the great 
army of women on their way to work. 

The fact that the business woman of 
today is the rule rather than the excep- 
tion has, however, caused a profound 
change in the life of the Church. There 
are fewer leisured women to do the con- 
ventional Church-work, and as a result 



the Church has suffered. Herein is a 
challenge to the Woman's Auxiliary: 
The emancipation of women, to use a 
trite phrase, has been attended with 
considerable paganism. Many business 
women are in God's house rarely, if at 
all. Many have borrowed the old ex- 
cuse from their brothers that "Sunday 
is the only day I have." 

The hopeful sign is that the Woman's 
Auxiliary has faced the situation and is 
vigorously striving to meet the new 
conditions. All honor to branches which 
see to it that there are chapters or sub- 
divisions which meet in the evening 
when business women can attend. Bet- 
ter still is the brave attempt to meet a 
changed situation which bristles with 
difficulties without deploring the passing 
of the good old days when women had 
more time to give. By its recognition 
of the conditions under which women 
work and live and think today, the 
Woman's Auxiliary has set an example 
to people in the Church who delight to 
live in the past. All honor to the women 
as they go forward. 



Canvass 

Our annual canvass for pledges for 
1946 is upon us. We indeed trust that 
the enlarged asking through the red side 
of the envelope can be met. It can be 
if the various parishes and missions will 
take pains. The fall canvass is not 
something to be undertaken selfishly 
with the idea of increasing the parish 
revenue and giving left-overs to mis- 
sions. Instead we need to remember 
that it was instituted to promote mis- 
sionary giving: it is the black side of the 
envelope, not the red, that is incidental. 



Our Cover 

Our cover picture this month is of 
Grace Church, Morganton, celebrating 
the 50th Anniversary of its consecration 
November 22nd, and the Centennial of 
the beginnings of the first church, a 
frame building. 



Centennial at Grace, Morganton 



B\ Rev C. G. Leavell 



The Centennial celebration of the 
building of the first Grace Church and 
the 50th Anniversary of the consecra- 
tion of the present stone church is to be 
held in Morganton November 22nd, be- 
ginning with an 11 :00 A. M. celebration 
of the Holy Communion. The Rt. Rev- 
erend Robert E. Gribbin, D.D., S.T.D., 
will be the centennial preacher. The 
Rev. William S. Stoney, present Rector 
of Grace Church, Anniston, Alabama, 
and the Rev. Norvin C. Duncan, retired 
clergyman of Asheville, are to make 
brief talks in the capacity of former 
Rectors of Grace Church, Morganton. 
Their addresses will follow luncheon in 
the Parish House. 

Mr. J. Ernest Erwin, Chairman of 
the Centennial Committee and one of 
the oldest members of Grace Church, is 
to preside at the afternoon session. Mr. 
John H. Pearson, Senior Warden of the 
Parish and oldest member of Grace 
Church, is to review interesting inci- 
dents in the history of the parish. The 
Rev. Charles G. Leavell, present Rector, 
is to make a brief address on the future 
prospects of the parish. 

Definite beginnings of Grace Church 
date back as early as 1841 when the 
Rev. Edward M. Forbes "first came as 
a missionary to Burke County, where 



there were a few members of the Church 
scattered in different parts around Mor- 
ganton." He was succeeded in 1844 by 
the Rev. John Steinforth Kedney who, 
as resident missionary worked under 
the Rev. Aaron Francis Olmsted, Rector 
of St. Luke's, Lincolnton. The first 
church, a modest but churchly frame 
structure, was begun in 1846. Before 
its completion and consecration the sixth 
Sunday after Trinity, July 11, 1847, the 
Rev. Joseph C. Huske, "then a young 
deacon of Fayetteville, was sent by the 
Bishop to take charge of the newly-or- 
ganized parish." 



Farewell 

The Highland Churchman has lost 
its editor, the Rev. D. J. Stroup, and the 
Diocese another fine priest in the person 
of the Rev. Grant Folmsbee who has 
left us for the Diocese of West Missouri. 
Both of these young men began their 
ministry in Western North Carolina and 
we wish that they had remained with us 
much longer. In a diocese where ten- 
ures are far longer than the average in 
the Church, it is a wrench when any of 
our priests make but a short stay with 
us. We wish our departing brethren 
every happiness in their new spheres of 
labor. 



BESSEMER CITY ELECTIONS 

A new mission committee was elected 
at St. Andrew's, Bessemer City, on Oc- 
tober 15. Mr. Henry Young, warden, 
Messrs. George Hook, Ambrose Clon- 
ninger, Mrs. Houston Godfrey and Mrs. 
Fula Carpenter are the new members. 
One member is yet to be elected by the 
young people as their representative. 

St. Andrews' congregation voted to 
accept a goal of $3000 for 1947. 



New Editor 

The Rev. W. C. Leach of Valle Crucis 
has been appointed by the Department 
of Promotion to succeed the Rev. Dud- 
ley J. Stroup as Editor of the Highland 
Churchman. In an interview with 
himself, Fr. Leach said that he hopes 
that the clergy and laity of the diocese 
will continue in their efforts to make the 
paper of interest and value to everyone 
in the diocese. 



3 



CHURCH CONGRESS 

A regional meeting of the Church 
Congress was held in Asheville on Oc- 
tober 9th. At the business meeting in 
the afternoon, the Rev. Charles G. 
Leavell was elected secretary-treasurer 
to succeed the Rev. D. J. Stroup. There 
were some informal talks on General 
Convention by the Rev. Messrs. Leav- 
ell, Jenkins and Stroup. 

In the evening there was a supper at 
the S & W Cafeteria, followed by two 
papers dealing with the subject, "Where 
Should the Church Put the Emphasis 
on Ministering to Men of Today?" The 
need for placing the emphasis on preach- 
ing was ably and convincingly presented 
by the Rev. Wm. S. Cravner of York, 
S. C. The second paper was given by 
the Rev. D. J. Stroup who declared 
that the emphasis must be placed where 
the Prayer Book has always placed it, 
on the sacraments of the Church. 



Question Box 



AUCTION AT VALLE CRUCIS 

The Boys' Club at Holy Cross raised 
$150 for the Quonset Parish House. 
They did it by scouring the community 
for furniture, household goods, and a 
weird collection of other things and auc- 
tioned them off on Saturday, October 
19th. The Auxiliary made $11 on pie 
and gingerbread at the auction. There 
is now over $1100 in the fund. 



NEW RECTOR FOR LINCOLNTON 

The Rev. Joseph S. Huske, Jr., has 
accepted the call as Rector of St. Luke's, 
Lincolnton, and has already taken up 
his work there. Mr. Huske comes to 
the Diocese from the Diocese of East 
Carolina. 

Mr. Huske, a native of Fayetteville, 
N. C, was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina in the class of 
1942 and from the Virginia Seminary 
in 1944. He was ordained deacon in 
1944 and advanced to the priesthood 
by Bishop Darst in 1945. 

The new rector of St. Luke's is the 
great-grandson of the Rev. Joseph C. 
Huske who held the same position from 
1847 to 1851. 



By Rev. J. P. Burke 

Can The Church Teach Vital Re- 
ligion? 

Let's substitute the word nurture for 
the word "teach" in this question. 

Man, according to Christian doctrine, 
is body, soul, and spirit. The Church 
can and does seek to nourish and de- 
velop all three of these vital parts of 
man. In striving to do this the Church 
uses sacraments, architecture, music, 
poetry, drama, games, symbols, vest- 
ments, lights, pictures and posters, as 
well as books, sermons, instructions, 
services and prayers. 

The Church cannot create instincts, 
but she can nourish, stimulate and de- 
velop them. She can make, under God, 
an atmosphere that is conducive to the 
wholesome growth of all three parts of 
man. Man, however, must believe and 
appropriate for himself. The Church 
can pray for man, but she cannot do his 
praying. 

According to Christian doctrine, man, 
so far as we know, is the only one of 
His visible creatures to whom God gave 
free will. Within limitations, man has 
the power to choose. He may choose 
to neglect the opportunity and to avoid 
the atmosphere that the Church pro- 
vides. In that case, the Church cannot 
have direct influence upon him. His 
spirit is, at least, in grave danger of 
becoming dormant. If and when it 
does, his existence upon this planet, for 
the time being, is not unlike that of the 
animals. That dormant spirit can be 
aroused. 

From the Christian view, there is no 
way to properly nurture a child or a 
man without cooperation. Given that 
cooperation the Church can arouse even 
a dormant soul to the highest develop- 
ment and attainment possible to man. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



Bx Lucy Fletcher 



The Woman's Auxiliary: what is it? 
The organization of women in the 
Church. Yes, but much more than that. 
The word 'auxiliary' means a helper, 
an aid, an assistant. 

The earliest women's organizations in 
our American Church were missionary 
societies. In 1872 the Woman's Auxili- 
ary to the Board of Missions was or- 
ganized. For nearly 50 years the work 
of the Auxiliary was carried on through 
mission study, gifts of money through 
the United Thank Offering, and gifts of 
clothing through the Supply Depart- 
ment. 

In 1920 we became Auxiliary to the 
National Council and all its depart- 
ments, and so we are today. 

Each parish and mission branch is 
auxiliary to the work of our Church in 
spreading Christ's Kingdom wherever 
our Church is at work, in far off lands, 
in our own country, in rural areas, in 
work among foreign born, among all 
races, in the armed services and on col- 
lege campuses. We are auxiliary to the 



department of Christian Education; we 
are auxiliary to the Department of Fin- 
ance to see that money necessary to 
carry on the program of the Church is 
available. 

Our diocesan Auxiliary, through its 
various departments and chairmen, 
seeks to assist the branches in carrying 
out this full program. Through the 
years we have grown in the number of 
women participating, in the variety of 
interests, and the amount of contribu- 
tions, but in our work of helping to 
"build the City of God" we never reach 
that point where we can say "That task 
is done." So in our Diocese there are 
still many women who have no part; 
there are many opportunities for the 
Auxiliary to give help and leadership. 

As individuals and as groups we need 
to worship and pray more diligently, to 
read and study, and to give more lib- 
erally of our time, our talents and our 
money that God may: 

"Give us the strength to build the City 
That hath stood too long a dream." 



The Triennial Convention of 1946 



By Mary 

Five hundred and one women with 
the prayer in their hearts to "Give us, 
God, the strength to build," met in 
the museum auditorium of the Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania. There were 473 
delegates, 20 executive board members, 
7 provincial presidents and the presid- 
ing officer, Mrs. Clinton S. Quin, of 
Texas. This total of 501 women repre- 
sented 105 dioceses and missionary dis- 
tricts. There were 82 full delegations, 
one of which was that of our diocese. 
When the roll call came at the opening 
session women stood to answer to the 



K. Stoney 

names of their diocese or missionary 
district from China to Liberia and from 
Alaska to Brazil. 

A comprehensive report entitled "The 
Crucial Years" was given by the Execu- 
tive Board and the staff of the Woman's 
Auxiliary to the National Council. This 
was a review of the Triennium from 
1943 to 1946. It has been printed and 
every woman in the church will have 
the opportunity of seeing what she had 
a hand in accomplishing in the past 
three years. 

By a vote of 278 to 19 the Revised 



By-Laws, as drawn up by the Board 
and Triennial Committee and as amend- 
ed on the floor, were adopted. The one 
notable change was the addition of one 
extra delegate to each Triennial Con- 
vention for each racial minority within 
a diocese or missionary district, if this 
racial minority is composed of at least 
three congregations and numbers at 
least 225 in membership. This will 



mean that at the next Triennial, West- 
ern North Carolina will have the privi- 
lege of sending one of her negro women 
as an additional delegate. 

These times are urgent. To you and 
to me comes the imperative call to be- 
come women of deep inner conviction 
that through our lives all men every- 
where may be led to seek after God and 
find Him. 



Christian Education in the Woman's Auxiliary 

By Anne H. K. Jenkins 



The Woman's Auxiliary is made up of 
groups of women in various parishes, in 
each Diocese, and all over the world 
where our Church has gone, who think, 
pray, act, give, and study in order that 
the work of our Lord may be carried 
forward. The Study Program, Chris- 
tian Education, is a vital part of the 
Auxiliary, and one which more and 
more is being undertaken by all women. 
In past years the mission fields of the 
Church, in foreign lands and here at 
home, have been used as a basis for 
study. These next three years have 
been dedicated to a broader and deeper 
study program, one which is of extreme 
value to every woman in the Church. 
Its aim is to prepare us to take our part 
in building a new world, a Christian 
world of brotherhood and peace. A 
gigantic undertaking which cannot pos- 
sibly be accomplished, you say? A 
gigantic undertaking, certainly, but one 
which must be accomplished, and which 
can be accomplished if we will faithfully 
and prayerfully follow the suggestions 
outlined in the Study Program present- 
ed so forcefully at the Triennial meeting 
in Philadelphia. 

This is not an unattainable goal. It 
is not an impractical vision, an idealistic 
impossibility. We, each one of us, in- 
dividually and collectively, can bring it 
about through faith, and prayer, and 



thought, and action. We must first of 
all be God-centered; we must be chan- 
nels through which God's Love can flow 
out to all men, and we must keep those 
channels clear. They become blocked 
when personal discouragement over- 
comes us, when racial antagonism and 
hatred flares up, when we turn away 
from God and let our own wills and de- 
sires and opinions take the place in our 
lives of God's Will and Desire and 
Knowledge. It is up to us, to you and 
to me, as individuals and as groups and 
as members of the One Body of Christ, 
to so align our living to God's Will that 
we fully "practice the Presence of God 
in every moment of every day. In this 
way, with God truly in us, guiding our 
every thought and word and deed, and 
giving us the strength to build, out of 
our own lives, our homes, our communi- 
ties, our world, will emerge that Holy 
City. This is our program for these 
next three years — to lay a solid foun- 
dation. 



The Woman's Auxiliary in Trinity, 
Asheville, was one of two branches in 
the State of North Carolina organized 
in 1873; this and the one at St. James, 
Lenoir, were two of the six branches 
which first made up the Woman's 
Auxiliary in the Diocese of North Caro- 
lina. 



Woman's Auxiliary Budget for 1947 

By May T. Neiv 



Diocese 

Missionary to the Southwest, 
The Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, 
Missionary work in Southwest 
part of Diocese #900.00 

Scholarship for child at Appala- 
chian School, Penland 200.00 

Scholarship for boy at Patterson 

School, Legerwood 200.00 

Scholarship for boy at Christ 

School, Arden 150.00 

Work among boys and girls at 

Valle Crucis 200.00 

Bishop's Discretionary Fund 175.00 

Highland Churchman, toward 

expense of publication 25.00 

Altar Guild Fund, to provide 

Altar materials where needed 5.00 

Young People's work in the Dio- 
cese 50.00 

Departmental Discretionary 
Fund for supplies and ma- 
terials for various departments 
of Woman's Auxiliary (Sup- 
ply, Church Periodical Club, 
Social Relations, Missions, 
Christian Education, etc.) 50.00 

Cumulative Triennial Fund, to- 
ward delegates' expense to 
Triennial , 75.00 

Year Books (to provide each 
member of the Auxiliary with 
a Year Book) 200.00 



#2230.00 

Nation and World 
Mission Work in the Nation 
(field designated by the Dio- 
cese) 125.00 

Mission Work in the World 
(field designated by the Dio- 
cese) 125.00 



Provincial Gift (half to Depart- 
ment of Missions and Church 
Extension, goes in great part 
to work of Mr. Robert Fletch- 
er with Deaf; half to Depart- 
ment of Christian Education 
for College work) 

Work among the Blind (Fund 
used for publication of litera- 
ture in Braille) 

Departmental Gift for Deaf 
(Mr. Robert Fletcher's work 
with the Deaf) 



50.00 



25.00 



25.00 



College Student Work (Mem- 
bership in Church Society for 
College Work and toward Stu- 
dent work in some North 
Carolina college) 

St. Augustine's, Raleigh (Schol- 
arship for negro girl at 
school) 

Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte 

Christmas Gift (to take care of 
special call at Christmas for 
help in some field) 

Church Mission of Help (Fund 
used to help needy girls in 
some of our crowded centers) 



50.00 



50.00 
50.00 



20.00 



50.00 



$ 570.00 



Total Budget #2800.00 

Plus 35^ per member for Central 
Fund. This fund pays the Provincial 
and National dues, stationery account, 
postage account, directories, and all mis- 
cellaneous expense for annual meeting, 
etc. 

The above budget represents an in- 
crease over 1946 of #250.00. 



THE WOMEN OF THE CHURCH 
GIVE THANKS 

By Jean S. Wooldridge 

In the past three years women all 
over our country have had much to be 
thankful for. The women of the Auxili- 
ary have had a perfect opportunity to 
express their thanks to God through a 
little blue box. Into this box they have 
put money whenever they have felt es- 
pecially grateful for their blessings, and 
each time a coin has been dropped into 
the Blue Box a prayer has accompanied 
it. On September 11th, in Philadelphia, 
all the delegates to the Triennial meet- 
ing of the Woman's Auxiliary, along 
with many, many other people, attended 
a service of Holy Communion, and the 
money which expressed women's thank- 
fulness was presented at the Altar. 
There was $1,633,126.20. Three years 
ago the total was $1,1 19,878.91. Through 
the expressed gratitude of the women 
of the Church many Missionaries' sal- 
aries are made adequate, many build- 
ings are repaired and equipped in the 
Mission fields, scholarships are provid- 
ed, missionary projects are supported 
in cooperation with other communions, 
and many other things are accomplish- 
ed. One item of particular interest to 
the delegates in the budget for the next 
triennium is the inclusion of $100,000.00 
for the work of the Church in Japan. 
Not only are foreign lands aided through 
this money, for here in our own Diocese 
are two buildings built through this 
United Thank Offering, one at Appala- 
chian School, Penland, and one at Valle 
Crucis. There are seven women mis- 
sion workers in our Diocese paid 
through the UTO. In many other ways 
our Diocese, our Province, our Nation 
and the whole world are helped as they 
would not be if the women were not 
thankful in this concrete way. 

The United Thank Offering is fifty- 
eight years old, and has grown from 
$82.71 to the wonderful amount pre- 
sented this year. Our Diocese in 1943 
presented $5,958.73; this year the 
amount from Western North Carolina 
was $10,000.00. 



THE ST. AUGUSTINE'S CONFERENCE 
FOR CHURCH WORKERS 

By Alice Maxwell 

I felt it an honor to represent the 
Fifth District of the Woman's Auxiliary 
in our Diocese at the Training Confer- 
ence for Church Workers, which was 
held at St. Augustine's College for 
Negroes in Raleigh, last June. The pur- 
pose is to train and stimulate worthy 
and capable leaders for the work of the 
Church, with emphasis upon Christian 
Education, Missions, Social Service, and 
a flexible program for the young people. 
Dr. D. A. McGregor, of the National 
Council, spoke on "Christian Life and 
World Problems". He said the greatest 
problem is the complete collapse of our 
society. All order is gone. The world 
has no pattern by which to piece things 
together. We are living in fear, and 
hating one another: Life must be re- 
organized in a new pattern, God's way. 

Father Loosemore, of the Cowley 
Fathers, from Bracebridge, Ontario, 
spoke on "The Church, The Parent, and 
The Teacher". We find the Sunday 
School is the place where most young 
people receive their religious education, 
and not the home. The Church can 
help by converting parents, and by giv- 
ing parents as well as teachers Child 
Training courses. The Church must 
teach that our religion is built around 
our duty towards God. 

Mrs. Stephan Mackey, Diocesan Pre- 
sident of the Negro Woman's Auxiliary 
in South Carolina, spoke on "Woman's 
Work in The Church", with emphasis 
on Worship, Study, Service, Gift, and 
Fellowship. We learn first to love God 
and our fellowmen. Prayer is the key- 
note: it will bring us knowledge of God, 
Christ, and the Gift of the Spirit. 



EPISCOPAL RADIO HOUR 

V. Jordan Brown has been named 
director of the "Episcopal Radio Hour" 
which is heard each Sunday morning 
at 10 o'clock over Station WNCA, 
Asheville. The Bishop, clergy and lay- 
men of the Diocese will present the 
faith of the Church each Sunday at this 
hour. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN 
SOCIAL RELATIONS 

By Mrs. W. T. Carpenter 

Yesterday we heard "Win the War" 
and we worked together and won the 
war. This took concerted effort on the 
part of Americans. Many, of course, 
were selfishly getting personal profits, 
but we did win. Today we hear "Win 
the Peace". Will we concentrate and 
mobilize to win peace and we did to win 
war? One tends almost to doubt it 
when we hear the bickerings one hears 
now. 

In our hustle and bustle with our ev- 
eryday life one wonders if America 
knows what Peace means. Would 
America want it? Will the other nations 
want it? As we think of Peace, the best 
definition which comes to mind is the 
practice of the Golden Rule. Does 
America want that? 

Mr. Episcopalian, would you want to 
practice the real Golden Rule in your 
business? If you have not done so, read 
the "House of 100 Bosses" by John 
Lear in Saturday Evening Post for Sep- 
tember 28, 1946. You may say this will 
not work in your business. Some other 
similar plan might. Mrs. Episcopalian, 
would you want the Golden Rule in your 
homes, clubs, even Auxiliary work? 

We believe Christian Social Relations 
will accomplish just what is needed for 
Peace. 

The pamphlet "First Steps in Chris- 
tian Social Relations" suggests that 
small interested church groups study 
family and community life in our local 
situations and then do something about 
the existing needs. During the war 
years we worked with other church and 
community groups in projects to send 
clothing, food, etc., overseas to those in 
need. Now let us continue to work to- 
gether to make our individual self and 
community more Christian in nature 
and by United Effort bring about that 
World Peace so badly needed. 

Suggested reading: "The Social Re- 
sponsibility of the Christian and of the 
Church", by Angus Dun. 



THE SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 

By Katharine Winborne 

The assignments for our Diocese from 
the Supply Department for this year 
are twofold. The first is a sum of 
money to be sent to help in the re- 
storation of five Mission Hospitals in 
China. In the past the Woman's 
Auxiliary has helped to provide supplies 
to all of these hospitals, and it should 
be of particular interest to help in their 
restoration to useful activity. 

The second request is for infants 
clothes, to be sent to the Good Shep- 
herd Hospital for Negroes at New Bern, 
N. C. This is an Episcopal Hospital in 
the Diocese of East Carolina. It has 
fifty-five beds, four cribs and eight bas- 
sinets. In 1945 a total of 945 patients 
were treated in this General Hospital. 



The Annual Meeting of the Woman's 
Auxiliary in the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina, in 1946, was the twen- 
ty-fourth annual meeting in the Dio- 
cese; there were, however, twenty-six 
annual meetings in the Missionary Dis- 
trict of Western North Carolina before 
it became a Diocese. Thus there have 
been fifty annual meetings in Western 
North Carolina. The Auxiliary is be- 
ginning its second half-century. 



"The Woman's Auxiliary serves as 
an instrument of the Church through 
which women may express in action 
their conviction that the hope of the 
world lies in the redeeming power of 
God's Love." — (from the pamphlet, 
"Tell us about the Woman's Auxiliary") 



Twenty-five persons from Western 
North Carolina were present at the ser- 
vice for the Presentation of the United 
Thank Offering on September 11, in 
Philadelphia. Five thousand persons 
made their communion at that service, 
which lasted one hour and a half. 



THE CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 

By Florence Drinker 

A student worked far into the night, 
for many nights, copying a text-book 
so that he and others might have the 
information contained in the one avail- 
able copy. 

A woman cut the recipes out of maga- 
zines to make a cook-book to use in her 
classes. 

In many American homes magazines 
are burned, books no longer used are 
stored in attics. These magazines and 
books could make such tasks as the 
above unnecessary, if they are turned 
over to the Church Periodical Club. 
The regular passing on of a monthly or 
weekly magazine can make life happier 
for many ministers, nurses, teachers, 
and other people who cannot otherwise 
read the current articles, or relax with 
good stories. 

The Church Periodical Club has rais- 
ed money to restore the Medical and 
Theological Libraries at Manila which 
were damaged and depleted during the 
war. In many other areas books and 
magazines are supplied to libraries as 
well as to individuals, through the 
Church Periodical Club. 



DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

By Isabel Patton 

The Department of Missions and 
Church Extension endeavors to keep 
before the Auxiliary the Church's work 
at home and abroad. 

During the past year many articles 
of clothing, furnishings and tools were 
sent by different branches to our rural 
missions and schools. 

In the drive for Reconstruction and 
Advance work, this department took 
every opportunity to bring the need be- 
fore the Auxiliary and to challenge the 
women to do their full part. 

The leaflets for the World Day of 
Prayer will be sent to each branch presi- 
dent. These leaflets will be distributed 
in the pews of our church to be used on 
that day. 



Youth News 

By Ann Shuford 



Districts 4, 5, and 6 of the Morganton 
Convocation met in Lenoir November 
2nd. The meeting opened with the 
Holy Communion at 10:30 a. m. The 
business meeting was concerned with 
the reorganization plan in the Diocese. 
The above three districts now form the 
Eastern District for Youth Work. The 
ladies of St. James Church served the 
luncheon for this meeting. 



The Young Churchman's Club of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, met October 
13th at the Rectory. Miss Sarah Bald- 
win, the president, presided. The Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, a delegate to the Nation- 
al Youth Convention, told the group 
about the plans and doings of the Con- 
vention. The resolutions passed at this 
gathering were read and explained. The 
offering of the Young People of the 
whole Church, received at the Corporate 
Communion on October 20th, is to be 
used for the education of Japanese 
youth for the Christian ministry. The 
offering of the young people of Calvary 
Church amounted to $22.06. 



Anyone wishing to get copies of the 
Song Book prepared by the Diocesan 
Youth Commission, please write to Miss 
Helen Thomas, 411 N. Marietta Street, 
Gastonia, N. C. 



NEWS ITEM 

The Diocesan Executive Board of the 
Woman's Auxiliary met at Trinity 
Church, Asheville, October 2 and 3, with 
the Bishop, sixteen members, and four 
visitors present. The Board elected 
Mrs. T. J. Woolridge to serve as Vice- 
President until the next Annual Meet- 
ing. Reports were heard from the dele- 
gates to the Triennial. District meetings 
were planned, and plans for the future 
were discussed. 



10 



Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



"THE ALTAR AND THE WORLD" 

By B. I. BelL 

Harper & Brothers, 1944, $1.25 

The apostle to the people who do not 
go to Church at all has produced a book 
which will be read with profit by those 
who do go and by those who do not. 
For the Churchman it relates the Lit- 
urgy to social action in a creative way. 
To the unchurched it provides signal 
proof that religion, more than any other 
human activity, is concerned with the 
common life of men. 

The structure of the Liturgy, as in the 
Book of Common Prayer, is followed 
strictly, with occasional reference to 
other rites. Nothing is ommitted, 
though some portions of the service re- 
ceive fuller treatment than others. Be- 
ginning with the Kyrie Eleison, the 
need for penitence and humility in the 
approach to God both for individuals 
and for a world like ours is made plain. 
The Epistle is stressed as the message 
for those who did win the victory in 
their own day, "Be not afraid". The 
Gospel and Creed go together as our 
Lord's exposition of divine love and the 
response of our faith. In the Offertory 
we are urged to remember that what 
we offer to God is our creative labour, 
our common life, and the Church on 
earth. 

The Prayer for the whole state of 
Christ's Church is the great intercession 
for all that we hold dear. The General 
Confession summarises both social and 
individual sin, and the Absolution and 
Comfortable Words can only promise 
forgiveness and divine favour on the 
condition of true repentence, of which 
the priest apart from sacramental con- 
fession is in no position to judge. The 
Sanctus sets forth the holiness of God 
and the need for holiness in us. In the 
Consecration God takes the initiative 



and comes to us, because we cannot go 
to Him unaided, that in the Oblation 
we may have something acceptable to 
plead. We invoke the Holy Spirit to 
deliver us from our evil way. Then at 
God's rendezvous we can have fellow- 
ship with our Lord and with one anoth- 
er in the Communion. We make our 
Thanksgiving that God has revealed to 
us the meaning of His world. In the 
Gloria we recapitulate our service, re- 
membering Christ at Bethlehem, at 
Calvary, and at the Right Hand of the 
Father. Then the Blessing reminds us 
that we have been made God's Blood- 
Brothers, and as such we return to His 
world. The scheme needs no comment. 
It is quite the best presentation of re- 
cent years. 



CONVOCATION AT MORGANTON 

The Convocation of Morganton met 
at Patterson School on October 31 at 
10:30 a. m. The Rev. B. M. Lackey, 
Sr. Dean of the Convocation, presided 
at a most interesting meeting which 
lasted all day. Speakers on the pro- 
gram included the Rev. James Mc- 
Keown who spoke on the Rural Lead- 
ership School held at Valle Crucis, the 
Rev. Ralph Webster who told of the 
Church's Puerto Rican work, the Rev. 
C. G. Leavell discussed the Every Mem- 
ber Canvass, and the Rev. W. J. Gor- 
don, Jr., told of the Church's work in 
northernmost Alaska. 

Luncheon and dinner were served by 
Patterson School. 



FR. GREENWOOD RETURNS 

The Rev. Westwall Greenwood has 
been appointed priest-in-charge of St. 
Luke's, Chunn's Cove and the Church 
of the Redeemer, Craggy. He will as- 
sume these charges on the second Sun- 
day in November. 

Fr. Greenwood was vicar of St. 
James', Black Mountain, before becom- 
ing the rector of Grace Church, Louis- 
ville, Ky., in April, 1944. He comes to 
Asheville from St. Katherine's School, 
Davenport, Iowa. 



11 



WEBBE IN SLICKS 

Fr. Webbe of Christ School, writing 
under the name of Stephen Cole, has 
sold three short stories to popular 
magazines. One of them, "New Boy", 
was published in the October 19 issue 
of the Saturday Evening Post. Another 
is soon to be published in Redbook 
magazine. 



EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 

November 10th marks the opening of 
the Church-wide Every Member Can- 
vass. Every parish and mission of the 
Diocese is asked to make a concerted 
effort to place the needs of the Christian 
religion before its members. 



Your Church Book Store 

QVER the years . . . since 1884 . . . 
we have been the shopping cen- 
ter for religious books and supplies 
for Episcopal families. 

Write us for anything you need. 
Expert attention by a trained staff will 
be given to your inquiries. 
BIBLES — PRAYER BOOKS — HYMNALS 

CROSSES — CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

ALL RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS FOR 

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Catalogs on request 

Morehouse-Gorham Co. 

14 E. 41st St. New York 17. N. Y. 



FAREWELL SERVICE AT ST. LUKE'S, 
LINCOLNTON 

St. Luke's Church in Lincolnton was. 
the scene of a farewell service held Sep- 
tember 29th in honor of the Rev. Grant 
O. Folmsbee, rector of the parish. Rep- 
resentatives were at the service from 
all of the Church Mr. Folmsbee had 
served during his stay in Lincolnton. 

The service of Evening Prayer was. 
made most impressive by a large choir 
consisting of members from St. Luke's,. 
Woodside, Bessemer City, High Shoals,, 
and Shelby. The Rev. Boston M. 
Lackey, Jr., read Evening Prayer and 
Mr. Folmsbee preached on the text "My 
peace I give unto you." He expressed 
his appreciation for the privilege of 
ministering to Churchmen in and around 
Lincolnton, Shelby, Bessemer City and 
High Shoals, and expressed the hope 
that the Church in these places would 
continue to expand in the service of our 
Lord. Mr. Folmsbee told the large con- 
gregation of his keen desire to see an 
increased fellowship among the Episco- 
palians of that area. 

The offering was sent to Bishop Grib- 
bin for use in diocesan Christian Edu- 
cation work. 



ECUSTA PAPER CORPORATION 

Pisgah Forest 
North Carolina 



MAKERS OF 

FINE CIGARETTE PAPER 

FOR 

THE LEADING CIGARETTE MANUFACTURERS 



12 



Early Days of Trinity Church, Asheville 

By Father Sill 



How different Asheville was 100 years 
ago from what it is today! It was then, 
in 1847, that the Rev. Jarvis Buxton, a 
young deacon in charge of St. John's 
Church, Rutherfordton, came there to 
minister to a few Church people and 
start an organization soon to develop 
into a parish. He may have come on 
horseback, as he was fond of riding. 
He came to a village of some 800 people. 
We may be able to picture an old court 
house, with outdoor whipping post and 
stocks, of course a jail, a few stores, a 
tannery, scattered homes, and two 
hotels, one of which was the Eagle, later 
to become famous, and in front of which 
in a few years "the long tin horn" of the 
driver would sound as he brought his 
stage coach and passengers up from the 
low country. 

The Presbyterians had already built 
on the present site of their house of wor- 
ship as had the Methodists opposite, 
with graveyards adjoining. After using 
rooms in different buildings for services, 
and having given up the charge at Ruth- 
erfordton, Mr. Buxton and the few 
Church members (it is said that there 
were only two upon his arrival, Mrs. 
Henrietta Patton and Mrs. William 
Coleman) decided to build a church. 
This was of brick and on the present 
site of Trinity, and was consecrated by 
Bishop Ives on July 6th, 1851, a parish 
organization having been formed. So 
began the use of the section of Ashe- 
ville, where a few years later was built 
the school for boys, and Mr. Buxton's 
home which stood behind the site of the 
present Bishop's house. 

Family names of the founders and 
early members of Trinity are familiar 
to Church people today. Among the 
founders were Mr. and Mrs. James W. 
Patton, Mrs. William Coleman, Mr. and 
Mrs. James Norwood, Mrs. Philetus 
Roberts, Misses Margaret and Charlotte 
Kerr. Other early members were Mrr. 



N. W. Woodfin, Judge Baily and Gen- 
eral James G. Martin. 

Mr. Buxton was a man of much en- 
ergy, tall and heavy-set, with bushy 
hair as described to me, of dignified 
bearing which grew as his years increas- 
ed. He brought his young wife, who 
was Miss Anna Nash Cameron of Fay- 
etteville, to Asheville soon after enter- 
ing on his work there. In time there 
were seven children, five daughters and 
two sons, all described as of large 
stature. Mr. Buxton was born near 
Washington, N. C, in 1820. He was a 
graduate of the University of North 
Carolina and General Seminary. He 
was one of the young men who helped 
in the work started at Valle Crucis un- 
der Bishop Ives, and was ordained 
deacon there. He was advanced to the 



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priesthood in 1849 at Rutherfordton. 

The three chief marks of Dr. Bux- 
ton's pastorate, as well as I can gather, 
were his faithfulness in the worship of 
the Church and in his pastoral duties, 
his interest in promoting education, and 
his missionary activities. We find week- 
day as well as Sunday services held on 
Wednesdays and Fridays and the con- 
gregations outgrew the first Church so 
that a new brick structure was erected 
in the eighties. Soon after settling in 
Asheville, Dr. Buxton started the School 
for boys, called Ravenscroft after the 
first bishop of North Carolina. He 
wrote in starting the school "We edu- 
cate the boys of the Church in the meth- 
ods of the Prayer Book and all Chris- 
tian culture." As his missionary ac- 
tivities expanded, Dr. Buxton was in- 
strumental in founding the work at 
Grace Chapel, Trinity Chapel, Haw 
Creek, St. Luke's, Chunn's Cove, and 
a chapel of which St. Matthias was the 
outgrowth. As the mission work grew 
there was need of priests to carry it on, 
which means a further story of the Rav- 
enscroft Associate Mission and a fur- 
ther story of Dr. Buxton's later years. 



ST. CYPRIAN'S CONSECRATED 

On St. Michael and All Angels Day, 
September 29th, St. Cyprian's Church, 
Franklin, was consecrated by Bishop 
Gribbin. This consecration culminated 
the years of work that have been done 
by the loyal colored congregation at 
Franklin. In addition to the service of 
consecration, the Rev. A. Rufus Mor- 
gan and Archdeacon Kennedy presented 
a class for confirmation by the Bishop. 

The service was well attended by the 
friends of St. Cyprian's, many of whom 
remembered Archdeacon Kennedy as 
one most instrumental in fostering the 
work of St. Cyprian's, giving much of 
his time and skill both as a priest and 
as an artisan to the Church. 

After the service, a dinner was served 
by the members of the Church. 



14 



PATRONAL FESTIVAL 

The annual patronal festival of St. 
Francis' Parish, Rutherfordton, was ob- 
served with a full day of well-rounded 
activity on October 4th. There was an 
early Eucharist, an afternoon medita- 
tion on the life of St. Francis, and an 
evening picnic on the rectory lawn. 

On Sunday, October 6, Bishop Grib- 
bin instituted the Rev. Ralph K. Web- 
ster as rector at the 11 o'clock service. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT, 
CIRCULATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY THE ACTS 
OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24.. 1912, AND 
MARCH 3. 1933 

Of THE HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN published 
monthly except January and September at Asheville, North 
Carolina, for October 1, 1946. 
State of North Carolina, 
County of Buncombe ss 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared William F. Toms, 
who, having been duly sworn according to law, deposes 
and says that he is the business manager of the HIGH- 
LAND CHURCHMAN, and that the following is, to 
the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of 
the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the 
circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date 
shown in the above caption, required by the Act of 
August 24, 1912, as amended by the Act of March 3, 
1933, embodied in section 537, Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions, printed on the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor, and business managers are: 

Publisher, The Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
Asheville, N. C. 

Managing Editor, Rev. D. J. Stroup, Asheville, N. C. 
Business Manager, William F. Toms, Asheville, N. C. 

2. That the owner is: 

The Diocese of Western North Carolina, 60 Ravenscroft 
Drive, Asheville, N. C, Rev. R. E. Gribbin, Bishop of 
the Diocese, Asheville, N. C. 

3. _ That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities, are: 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, 
if any, contain not only the list of stockholders and 
security holders as they appear upon the books of the 
company but also, in cases where the stockholder or 
security holder appears upon the books of the company as 
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name of the 
person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, is 
given; also that the said two paragraphs contain state- 
ments embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to 
the circumstances and conditions under which stockholders 
and security holders who do not appear upon the books of 
the company as trustees, hold stock and securities in a 
capacity other than that of a bona fide owner; and this 
affiant has no reason to believe that any other person, 
association, or corporation has any interest direct or in- 
direct in the said stock, bonds, or other securities than as 
so stated by him. 

WILLIAM F. TOMS 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 23rd day of 
September, 1946. 

SADIE JUNE LOVE 
(My commission expires March, 1947) 



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TRAINING OF RURAL PASTORS 

The Training of Rural Pastors in the 
Episcopal Church is the subject of a 
study by the Rev. James McKeown, 
written recently as a thesis for a master 
of arts degree at Drew University. 

Mr. McKeown discusses the need for 
missionary work within the borders of 
the United States. "There are some 
sections of the country," he says, "whose 
conditions cry out for the help that the 
Church can give." 

The proposals Mr. McKeown makes 
are as follows: 

1. A department of rural courses, 
presumably in the seminaries, offering, 
among other subjects, Rural Church 
Management, The Church and Rural 
Life, Rural Adult Education, The Rural 



Community, Rural Church Finance, 
Rural Social Agencies, The Cooperative 
Movement, Rural Economics, Rural 
Sociology, Rural Developments in the 
Missionary Churches. 

Mr. McKeown's suggestion for any 
seminary unable to introduce such a de- 
partment is to start on a small scale, 
with cn'y one instructor. 

2. Rural courses given in seminaries 
by nearby rural pastors. This plan is 
working well in two schools in Tennes- 
see. 

3. A professor in an established de- 
partment teaching some rural subjects. 

4. Exchange classes between two 
seminaries. 

Mr. McKeown is now priest-in-charge 
of St. Luke's, Boone and the missions 
at Todd, Beaver Creek, and Glendale 
Springs. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



Churchman 




The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVII 



DECEMBER, 1946 



NO. 8 




1 \ a 'V. ' ) .♦» t*f' 

Old Trinity Church, Asheville 



aHjF ijugljland 
(Etjurrtfrnan 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19. 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin. D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Mr. W. H. Stewart Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. \V. 
i Farnum, The Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



Christmas 

Christmas each year brings us not 
only infinite joy and gladness, but in the 
changing world in which we live, each 
Christmas brings with it a challenge. 

If we attempted to describe in one 
word the condition of the world today, 
we believe that the world would be 
"Irritation". The nations of the world 
are not making war preparations, but 
they have gotten on one another's 
nerves, and seem to delight in calling 
one another names. The United States 
has not been visited with a great dis- 
aster, but there are unaccustomed an- 
noyances in daily life for which people 
seek a scape-goat. As a result we are 
just where mankind was at the first 
Christmas. No major war was then 
raging yet there was not Peace and 
Goodwill reigning among men. 

All good Churchmen plan to make 
their Christmas communions, and many 
to whom God has given good lungs will 
join heartily in the singing of the carols. 

So the question which we need to 
ask ourselves is whether in singing the 
words, "when shepherds watched their 



flocks by night," we really mean that it 
is in our hearts to do our part to spread 
the angelic message of which we sing. 

A little observation will convince us 
that this task can be done. We all con- 
tribute to someone's business at Christ- 
mas. If there is a Scrooge within the 
confines of Western North Carolina, we 
have not had the honor of his acquain- 
tance. What we all need to do is to 
so steep ourselves in the spirit of the 
dear Christ Child that our very pres- 
ence dispels the thoughts of irritation 
and antagonism that seem to dwell in 
so many human hearts. Thus we can 
bring joy to men and women in the 
place where they need it most. 

Christmas ever tells us of the power 
of the Christian Faith. Let us realize 
that power by asking the Christ Child 
to give us more helpful dispositions, to 
make us more cheerful, optimistic and 
definitely sure that we have entrusted 
to us the force that will make us of 
service in the healing of the nations. 

"Thou Light of uncreated Light 

Shine on us, holy Child; 

'1 hat we may keep Thy birthday bright 

With service undefiled. 
Rejoice, rejoice, the Incarnate Word 
Has come on earth to dwell; 
No sweeter sound than this is heard 

Emmanuel, Emmanuel." 



CONGRATULATIONS 

To venerable Grace Church, Morgan- 
ton, now a centenarian, and to middle- 
aged All Souls', Biltmore, which has 
just arrived at tlje age of fifty, we offer 
our felicitations. These are two of our 
larger and stronger parishes which mean 
so much in our diocesan life. Both 
have rectors on whom the rest of us 
lean heavily, and both have furnished 
the diocese with helpful lay leadership. 

There is nothing much finer than 
happiness in parish life. A notable fact 
about Grace and All Souls' is that they 
seem so absolutely united. 

May the rest of us, catching inspira- 
tion from the joy of our brethern, con- 
tinue to work with them for the con- 
tinuation of our happy diocesan life. 



The Ravenscroft Association 



By The Rev. J. B. Sill 

EDITOR'S FOREWORD: 

Trinity Church, Asheville, was to be featured in the November issue, but the 100th anniversary 
of a sister church took journalistic precedence. Fr. Sill has spent much labor and research on the 
early history of the church in Asheville which centered around Trinity, and we are delighted to de- 
vote the feature space this month to the result of those labors. It is easier for us to know the 
source of Trinity's present strength when zee know of the consecrated efforts of priests and laymen 
of the past. 



Though having a parish to look after 
Dr. Buxton may be said to have laid 
the foundation of the Church's mission- 
ary work west of the Blue Ridge. While 
the Ravenscroft Associate Mission seems 
to have been established in the late 
1860's. it being a plan promoted by 
Bishop Atkinson, it was through Dr. 
D. H. Buel, who came to take charge 
in 1872. that very much progress was 
accomplished. A training school for 
the ministry was a part of the Associate 
Mission work, the building used by 
priests and students being that previous- 
ly used by the School for boys, started 
by Dr. Buxton, which lasted for only a 
few years. Bishop Atkinson said "In 
providing ministers we must look prin- 
cipally homeward for a supply. To 
raise them from among the people them- 
selves permanently and effectually, we 
must have schools at home under the 
care of the Church, parochial and dio- 
cesan schools". So Dr.'s Buxton and 
Buel became pioneers of an educational 
policy which has continued in our Mis- 
sionary District and Diocese to the 
present time. For short periods before 
Dr. Buel's time, Rev.'s George Wilmer 
and F. J. Murdoch served in the Asso- 
ciate Mission, the latter belonging to 
Trinity parish, and being made priest 
in 1-870. He soon entered upon his field 
at Salisbury, as rector of St. Luke's 
Church. At times there were two, four 
and more students at the Training 
School, it being reported that altogether 
fifteen candidates- for the ministry- 
studied there until the closing of it- -about 
1 890. The present Bishop's residence-, 
formerly known as Schoenberger Hall, 



was erected in 1886 for purposes of the 
Training School, being named after its 
donor, Mr. John Schoenberger, a friend 
of Bishop Lyman's, and costing $11,000, 
who also gave $7000 for an endowment 
of the school. The previously occupied 
Ravenscroft building was then used for 
a boy's high school, the late Haywood 
Parker being- one of its headmasters. 




The Rev. Jarvis Buxton 

Dr. Buxton continued to minister to 
and build up the Missions that he had 
started, at Beaver Dam, Chunn's Cove, 
Haw Creek, West Asheville and Way- 
nesville, also Trinity Chapel, now St. 
Matthias, for the colored, at this last 
Rev. S. V. Berry coming in 1874 to 



continue in charge for several years. At 
Beaver Dam fifty members were report- 
ed in 1867, when the first Church was 
built. At Chunn's Cove, Mr. and Mrs. 
E. J. Armstrong were early members of 
St. Lukes, as also Mr. and Mrs. William 
T. Owen, in whose home the first ser- 
vices were held, they later being held 
under a weeping willow tree in Mrs. 
Metz' yard. Lay people of Trinity 
Church, notably Capt. Thomas Patton 
and his sister, Miss Fanny Patton and 
Mrs. C. W. DeVault, helped in caring 
for St. Luke's. It was due to Dr. Bux- 
ton's ministry at Haw Creek that George 
E. Bell entered upon preparation for 
the ministry. He later became one of 
the Associate Missioners, and was help- 
ful at times to Dr. Buxton at Trinity, 
another young man who entered the 
ministry under Dr. Buxton's influence 
being William F. Rice; who also became 
an Associate Missioner. Dr. Buel was 
alone in the Associate Mission during his 
first years in charge, and at different 
diocesan conventions complained that he 
couldn't give time to the Training School 
because of the calls of the Mission field. 
We read of his ministrations at Brevard, 
Waynesville, Mica Vale, Cullowhee, and 
The Forks of The Pigeon. Churches 
were built, Waynesville had become a 
parish in 1866. His was a hard and 
difficult field, searching for the scattered 
sheep and bringing them into a Church 
fold. 

He was born at Troy, N. Y., in 1817. 
Was a graduate of the General Seminary 
in New York. He married a daughter 
of Bishop Atkinson. He served for 
several years as a delegate from the 
diocese to General Convention. He 
received honorary degrees from both 
Yale and Trinity College, Hartford, 
Conn. Bishop Lyman in an obituary 
notice of him says "He led a very self- 
sacrificing and laborious life, never spar- 
ing himself, but making almost every 
week a long and fatiguing journey to 
his several Missions, and carefully keep- 
ing his appointments even in the most 
severe and inclement weather." He 
died in Baltimore in 1893. 



The work at Trinity Church continued 
to grow. In 1868 the communicants 
numbered 46, but the same condition 
of parish life troubled the good priest 
as it often troubles one of our time, for 
in his report to the diocese "I do not 
know where they are, with the Church 
or with the world". He reports the 
same year catechumens 61, and two 
years later catechumens, white 40, color- 
ed 90. Trinity Chapel (for the colored) 
was still under his care. He evidently 
stressed the preparation for baptism. 
He reports that the feast days and fast 
days of the Church are observed. On 
closing his ministry at Trinity, he re- 
ports 100 communicants. 

I quote from a letter to me from 
a great-niece of Dr. Buxton's: "He was 
a fine horticulturist, always had a beau- 
tifully cared-for vineyard and berry 
patches. He had a farm in the country 
from which he got his eggs and butter 
and his winter's wood. He had a highly 
developed sense of thrift and orderliness, 
the wood being always stacked up in 
beautiful piles ready for use." 

From an obituary in a Church paper 
"A noble priest, an humble, devoted 
Christian, who led among his people a 
consistent, blameless life, he labored for 
the good of his fellow man, to the glory 
of God, with the judgement of mature 
years, and the energy, buoyancy and 
perseverance of youth". 



WORLD RELIEF 

In urging Christmas contributions to 
the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World 
Relief, Bishop Tucker called attention 
to the gifts of the wise men from the 
East to the Infant Savior. "Because 
they believed Him to be a King, they 
brought gifts befitting royalty, and be- 
cause they found a Child in need, they 
left them at the manger. We cannot 
go back over the centuries and follo/iy a 
star to a manger in Bethlehem, but in 
His Name who said, 'Inasmuch as ye 
have done it unto the least of one of 
these my brethern, ye hava 4pne it unto 
me,' we can bring our sifts to assist 
these innocent victims of total war." 



YOUNG CHURCHMEN NEWS 



By Ann Shuford 



On November 2nd, the young people 
of the Convocation of Morganton had 
their first youth rally since the Diocese 
was redistricted on the lines of the 
Convocations. Young people from Mor- 
ganton, Quaker Meadows, Gastonia, 
Bessemer City, Lincolnton, Lenoir and 
Shelby met at St. James', Lenoir at 
10:30 a. m. for Holy Communion. Fol- 
lowing the welcome and introductions 
there were two reports on the General 
Convention by Bishop Gribbin and Mr. 
Leavell. After lunch Helen Thomas 
gave a very interesting report about the 
first meeting of the National Youth 
Convention, which she attended in Phil- 
adelphia. The Rev. Rufus Morgan, of 
Franklin, talked to the group about 
mission work in general and told of the 
plan to have young people attend who 
might like to become church workers 
for rural workers held at Valle Crucis 
during the summer. 

Helen Thomas, as the diocesan presi- 
dent of the Young Churchmen, presided 
over the business session. The following 
district officers were elected: Fuller 
Chaffee of Morganton, President; Willa 
Dean Hook of Bessemer City, Vice- 
President; Sue Oxford of Quaker 
Meadows, Secretary-Treasurer. Fuller 
Chaffee invited the district to meet at 
Morganton next time. The meeting was 
adjourned about 4 P. M. 



The young people of St. Mary's, 
Quaker Meadows, have been meeting 
regularly on Tuesday nights. They 
practice for the junior choir and have 
begun working on a pageant to be pre- 
sented at Christmas. 



President; Mary Murphy Boggs, Vice- 
President; Doug Van Noppen, Secre- 
tary; Tommy Lyman, Treasurer; Clara 
Kate Boggs and Mary Aston Leavell, 
Group leaders. Francie Lyman is the 
new chairman of the Junior Altar Guild. 

The league is planning to pot plants 
and sell them at the Woman's Auxiliary 
bazaar to help raise some money for 
the treasury. Another of the league's 
projects is singing in the choir. Many 
of the members worked with the senior 
choir in preparing special music for the 
centennial of Grace Church on Novem- 
ber 22. 

The Young People have been having 
joint meetings with the Presbyterian 
Young People on every third Sunday 
of the month. They take turns enter- 
taining each other and exchange ideas. 
Both groups seem to benefit through 
this arrangement. 



The Girls' Friendly Society of Holy 
Cross Church, Valle Crucis, earned 
$50.00 toward the parish house fund by 
sponsoring three square dances. The 
attendance was good and everyone had 
a grand time. 



Grace Church, Morganton: The 
young people here recently elected new 
officers. They are: Fuller Chaffee, 



The young people of St. James', 
Hendersonville, gave a Thanksgiving 
pageant on Sunday, November 17, at 
the church building. The script was 
written by Mrs. Robert Maney and the 
play was under the direction of Miss 
Elizabeth Hughes. Those taking part 
were Anne Waldrop, Sue Briggs, Patty 
Stonham, Nancy Sterling and Audrey 
Briggs. After the pageant each class 
representative was given a list of what 
every class could contribute to the 
Church World Service Center. At the 
close of the service the need of the 
Thompson Orphanage was stressed. 



Woman's Auxiliary 

News 



By Elizabeth F. Van Noppen 

The women of the Diocese turned out 
in large numbers for the District Meet- 
ing held in October at Rutherfordton, 
Tryon, Hendersonville, Asheville and 
Boone. 

The highlight of the meeting was the 
news of the Triennial Convention 
brought by our Diocesan delegates. 

Mrs. T. J. Woolridge, U.T.O. Treas- 
urer, told how her hints and suggestions 
pulled our own offering up to $10,000, 
and described in vivid detail the presen- 
tation service for the United Thank 
Offerings. Mrs. May T. New, Diocesan 
Treasurer, gave a brief review of the 
financial report of the National Church 
and of the National Auxiliary. Mrs. 
Mark Jenkins told of the great spiritual 
value of the meditations by the Rt. Rev. 
Angus Dun, impressing on the women 
the necessity for the development of a 
deeper personal spiritual life. Personal- 
ities of the Convention were discussed 
by Mrs. A. B. Stoney, who told of the 
outstanding men and women who meant 
so much to the Convention. Our Dio- 
cesan President, Miss Lucy Fletcher, 
recounted many interesting side-lights- 
on the happenings there. 

Heard for the first time was our 
church worker at Glendale Springs, Mrs. 
E. L. McKinsey, who talked briefly on 
the chapel to be built on the Indian 
Reservation at Cherokee. 

In her report on the Diocesan work, 
Miss Fletcher brought forth the sug- 
gestion for a summer conference for 
Churchwomen to be held at either Valle 
Crucis or Patterson School for a five or 
six day period during early August. It 
was explained that this conference would 
in no way replace or interfere with the 
Annual Adult Conference at Kanuga, 
but rather that it would stimulate in- 



MORGANTON ANNIVERSARIES 

The 100th anniversary of the erection 
of the first building for Grace Church 
and the 50th anniversary of the conse- 
cration of the present church building 
were observed Friday, Nov. 22nd, be- 
ginning at II o'clock with Holy Com- 
munion and the centennial sermon 
delivered by Bishop Gribben. Bishop 
Gribbin was the celebrant, assisted by 
the Rev. C. G. Leavell, Rector, and by 
the Revs. W. S. : Stoney and Basil Wal- 
ton. The Rev; Norvin C. Duncan, a 
former rector, and the Rev. Joseph 
Wilson, former missionary in Burke 
County were also in the procession. 

■■,. Among the many visitors present were 
the Rev. William Capers and Mrs. 
Capers of Tryon, Father Sill, the Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, and the Rev. W. C. Leach 
and Mrs. Leach, and the Rev, B. M. 
Lackey, Sr. 

. .-Following the morning service, lunch 
was served by the Woman's Auxiliary of 
Grace Church in the parish house at 1 
o'clock. 

J. E. Erwin of Morganton, chairman 
of the committee in charge of general 
arrangements and one of the oldest 
members of the church, presided at the 
luncheon meeting. 

JiOhn H. Pearson, oldest living mem- 
ber of the church, reviewed the interest- 
ing events in the history of the church. 
Prospects for the parish were touched 
on briefly by the Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



terest in the Kanuga Conference. It is 
thought that many women could attend 
a short, inexpensive conference who 
would not be able to stay away from 
home for so long a period as two weeks. 
Furthermore, the value of working and 
studying together in a small group would 
be inestimable. Miss Fletcher urged 
the women to discuss fully this proposed 
conference in their branch meetings, so 
that they would be able to give her their 
opinions in their annual reports. 



6 



COTTAGE PRAYER MEETINGS 

Lay Reader John T. Oxford has been 
holding cottage prayer meetings in sev- 
eral homes of the communicants of St. 
Mary's, Quaker Meadows, this fall. 
Meetings have been held at the homes 
of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Digh, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Harrison, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Abe Franklin. Attendance of men, wo- 
men, and children has been excellent, 
running as high as forty persons. Al- 
though most interest has been shown on 
the part of members of St. Mary's 
Mission, quite a few non-memers have 
also attended. Up to the present time 
the cottage meetings have been held in 
the so-called "Lost Corner" section, 
located in a fomerly somewhat inacces- 
sible but well-populated place slightly 
over a mile from the mission. Prospects 
are now that meetings will also be held 
west of the mission. The procedure has 
been to have a brief Bible quiz in which 
the children can take part, the reading 
of the Bible, a short talk, and prayers 
both from the Prayer Book and extem- 
poraneous. 

Activity at St. Mary's has increased 
this fall. Evening Prayer is now being 
held at 7:00 P. M. by the Rev. Mr. 
Leavell on the second and fourth Sun- 
days, and Holy Communion at the 
Sunday School and the old service hour 
of 3:00 P. M. on third Sundays of each 
month. Five new homes just across 
from the mission have been completed 
recently, and their occupants have help- 
ed swell the congregation at these ser- 
vices. The Young Peoples' Service 
League is now meeting each Tuesday 
night and rehearsing for a Christmas 
Pageant. 



On Wednesday, November 6th, the 
congregation of the Church of the Re- 
deemer in Shelby had a Parish supper 
as a kick off for the Every Member 
Canvass Drive. The supper was well 
attended, and the needs of the Church 
in Shelby, in the Diocese and in the 



world were presented. Pledge cards 
were distributed to be followed up by 
letters and calls. The need for increased 
giving to the Church's work in Western 
North Carolina and overseas missions 
was stressed by the minister in charge. 
The Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., and 
the budget for 1947 for the Church of 
the Redeemer was given by the treas- 
urer, Mr. E. L. Kemper. Mr. Kemper 
emphasized the fact that not only did 
the church need more pledges to carry 
an increased budget, but that all mem- 
bers would have to give more if the 
work of the Episcopal Church in Shelby 
is to progress in the coming years. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the church 
prepared and served the meal buffet 
style at the Women's Club Building in 
Shelby. 



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Question Box 



Is the Episcopal Church for English 
speaking people only? 

No. The Episcopal Church and other 
churches of the Anglican communion 
earnestly endeavour to see that native 
groups coming into the Church should 
have the services of the Prayer Book in 
their own language. 

We are committed to this ideal of 
worship in the language which the peo- 
ple use by the action of the English 
Church at the Reformation. One of the 
largest complaints against the old ser- 
vice books (and services) was that they 
were not understood by the people. 



Our Church in China uses the native 
language, so does the Church in Japan, 
so does our Church in India, and in the 
Caribbean. 



Your Church Book Store 

QVER the years . . . since 1884 . . . 
we have been the shopping cen- 
ter for religious books and supplies 
for Episcopal families. 

Write us for anything you need. 
Expert attention by a trained staff will 
be given to your inquiries. 
BIBLES — PRAYER BOOKS — HYMNALS 

CROSSES — CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

ALL RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS FOR 

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Catalogs on request 

Morehouse-Gorham Co. 

14 E. 41st St. New York 17, N. Y. 



At the recent General Convention, 
mention was made of referring certain 
subjects to the Lambeth Conference. 
What is this Lambeth Conference? 

The Lambeth Conference is a meet- 
ing which gets its name from the resi- 
dence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, 
historic Lambeth Palace. 

Once every ten years Bishops of the 
Anglican Communion throughout the 
entire world gather at Lambeth. Bishops 
from all the national churches in com- 
munion with the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury meet under his leadership. He is 
the Senior Bishop of the Anglican Com- 
churches are discussed. 

The Lambeth Conference is not a 
legislative body. All of its action is 
advisory. The Churches are not bound 
by any action taken at Lambeth Con- 
ference. Its action is purely advisory 
in nature. 

The Bishops of our Episcopal Church 
attend and participate in the Lambeth 
Conference since our Church is a part of 
the Anglican communion. 



ECUSTA PAPER CORPORATION 

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North Carolina 

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Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



"HIS BODY THE CHURCH" 

The Bohlen Lectures for 1945, de- 
livered at Philadelphia Divinity School 
by Rev. W. Norman Pittinger: More- 
house-Gorham. 

When Fr. Pittinger publishes a book 
it is always easy to read and theologic- 
ally sound. Moreover, he is one of 
those rare individuals whose minds re- 
tain everything they have ever learned. 
So for those who want a clear under- 
standing of the nature of the Christian 
Church, nurtured within our own 
Anglican Communion but drawing from 
and appreciating all that is true in other 
traditions, here is the book. 

First comes a consideration of the 
Church in the early and valid Christian 
Tradition, with the insistence that 
"apart from the Church there would 
today be no genuine knowledge of 
Jesus, no adequate understanding of 
Him, and no self-forgetful love, worship, 
and obedience directed toward Him, be- 
yond that possible of any other rather 
vaguely known historical figure". And 
as the Body of Christ, Fr. Pittinger 
agrees with the Russian Orthodox that 
fellowshiprjn-love is the peculiar and 
identifying mark of the Christian 
Church. 

Four of the lectures are given up to 
ar> analysis of what we mean when we 
say that we believe in ONE HOLY 
CATHOLIC and APOSTOLIC 
CHURCH. Then comes discussion of 
the Churches function in worshipping 
God and in proclaiming the Faith. No 
study of the Church would be complete 
without an attempt to relate the Church 
we know on earth to that greater reality, 
the Church Expectant and Triumphant, 
beyond the grave; the eighth lecture 
does this most effectively. Finally comes 
a presentation of the Church in the 
world today, maintaining her historic 
character and work in modern condi- 
tions. The book is one which the serious 
Christian layman ought not to miss. 



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KANUGA — CHRISTMAS EVE, 1945 

By Annie H. K. Jenkins 



High in the chalice of encircling hills 
Lie the serene waters of Kanuga Lake, 
Quiet and dreaming "neath the winter 

stars; 
Reflecting from their frozen surfaces 
The myriad lamps which light this 

Christmas Eve. 
Softly and silently the mighty oaks 
And pines clothe their great forms in 

festal robes 
Of glistening ice, in honor of His birth. 

Because the selfish hearts of men refuse 
To make their just oblation to their God, 
Nature must bow, as in the ancient tale 
Beasts made obeisance to their Infant 

Lord. 
And so the giant trees bow low their 

heads 
And fall prostrate before the Wondrous 

Life 
Which came to earth this night so long 

ago. 

The Altar in the Chapel of the Woods 
Echoes the tumultuous shouts of praise 
As towards it kneels a powerful forest 
king, 



Giving his love in thanks for God's 
Great Love. 

The thunderous drumming of their 
voices forms 

An orchestral background for the An- 
gels' song: 

''Glory to God in the Highest, and on 
earth 

Peace, good will . . ." and the forest 
echoes, "Glory!" 

THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION 

At the request of the Joint Commis- 
sion on Theological Education, Presid- 
ing Bishop-elect Henry K. Sherrill has 
designated the Third Sunday after the 
Epiphany, January 26, 1947, as Theo- 
logical Sunday. Said Bishop Sherrill, 
"This Sunday I hope will be the occa- 
sion for addresses in every church upon 
the subject of the importance of the 
work of our Theological Seminaries, and 
furthermore that in every parish there 
will be given an opportunity for the 
people of the Church to give financial 
support to the Seminaries . . . To a very 
large extent the character of the Church 
is determined by the quality of the 
clergy." 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

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officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

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10 



FR. SAYLOR PRESIDENT OF 
BAT CAVE COMMUNITY CLUB 

"It's an ill fire that brings no good." 
A by-product of the fire at Bat Cave 
which burned the chapel of the Trans- 
figuration to the ground is the Friday 
Evening Community Club. The Club 
began with monthly meetings in the 
Parish House. When that burned, 
something else had to be done. Mr. and 
Mrs. Edgar Flack, who run the Esmer- 
alda Inn, offered the facilities of the Inn 
to the Club. Weekly supper meetings 
are now held Friday evenings at the 
Esmeralda Inn, each family bringing 
its own "covered dish" contribution for 
the "pot luck" supper which is served 
in cafeteria style. The Rev. Fr. Frank 
A. Saylor, Priest-in-Charge of the 
Mission of the Transfiguration, is Presi- 
dent of the Community Club. 

When Fr. Saylor wanted to have a 
parish meeting November 15 th, he 
simply asked the Club to let the business 
after supper be that of the Episcopal 
Church. His wish was readily granted. 
Acting as Priest rather than President, 
he gave a report on the progress of the 
new Church and Parish House in the 
actual construction of which he is taking 
an active part. The congregation was 
interested to hear that the work was 
progressing, much of the wiring com- 
pleted, and prospects for holding the 
Midnight Christmas Eve celebration in 
the Parish Hall quite good. The Church, 
somewhat larger than the old one, will 
not be completed until spring, at the 
earliest. Following Fr. Saylor's report, 
a representative of the Diocesan De- 
partment of Promotion spoke on Christ- 
ian Stewardship and the Mission of the 
Church, by way of preparation for the 
Every-Member-Canvass. 



ISOLATED FAMILIES CAN BEGIN 
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By the press of the Society of St. John 
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under the Superiorship of Father Roland 
Palmer, many valuable pamphlets and 
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11 



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When Ye Pray, published in 1944, we 
reprint suggestions especially designed 
for isolated Churchmen. (The page 
numbers are changed from Fr. Palmer's 
book to correspond with our American 
Prayer Book.) 

If you live in a place far from a 
church, try to begin Church life: 

By starting a small Sunday School in 
your home or schoolhouse. 

By reading the Church service on 
Sunday for your family and neighbors. 

By gathering people together to listen 
to a Church service over the radio. j 

| In reading Morning or Evening* 
Prayer, leave out the Absolution, which' 
only a priest or bishop is authorized to 
use. 

The tables of lessons are in the front 
of the Prayer Book. If there is difficulty 
in finding or reading them, use the 
Epistle and Gospel for the day instead. 




MURPHY YOUTH CENTER 

Sister Virginia Hetherington, Church 
Army worker at Murphy, is in charge 
of the Youth Center recently opened in 
the Carnegie Library building. 

This Youth Center is the culmination 
of a project long worked on by the 
Junior and Senior Woman's clubs. It 
is financed by public subscription, and 
there are no dues. The Library board 
has donated the use of the room which, 
has been redecorated and equipped with, 
facilities for games and recreation. 

The center will be open Friday and, 
Saturday evenings and Sunday after- 
noons, a recreational association cooper- 
ates in the supervision and acting as 
chaperones. Sister Hetherington will be 
in charge at each meeting. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



CTjttrcjman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. VXII 



FEBRUARY, 1947 



NO. 9 




The Bishop's Chair at Valle Crucis 



®tj? 3ftgtjlan& 
(Eljurrljman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19. 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



enjoy their Asheville domicile visited 
often by their children, grandchildren 
and other relatives whom he so often 
mentioned with deep affection. 



A Well Earned Rest 



The retirement of the Rev. George 
Floyd Rogers from the rectorship of 
Trinity Church, Asheville, will seem to 
many like the end of an epoch. There 
are not many active in the diocesan life 
who can recall Trinity Parish under any 
other rector. 

Mr. Rogers took an active and promi- 
nent part in the life of the diocese and 
in the exercise of the various duties that 
devolved upon him showed an invariable 
sense of understanding and fair play. 
Western North Carolina will seem like 
another diocese without him. Perhaps 
his most valued contribution was his 
masterly handling of the difficult condi- 
tions which prevailed while we were 
without a head following the death of 
Bishop Horner. Few know all the de- 
tails with which he had to wrestle but 
those who do are eternally grateful. 

We rejoice in the fact that the rector 
of Trinity is soon to enjoy a well-deserv- 
ed rest. May he and his good wife long 



Segregation 

The account of the last meeting of the 
National Council in our Church press 
brought up a question about which more 
will be heard in the years that are im- 
mediately to follow. 

It appears that the American Church 
Institute for Negroes which maintains a 
number of schools of various types, was 
on the point of conducting a financial 
campaign for the improvement of their 
property, but on the principle that the 
greater should contain the less gave way 
to the "Reconstruction and Advance 
Fund" with a promise that they should 
receive aid from the proceeds of the 
Fund. Certain members of the National 
Council objected to the funds being 
granted on the grounds that the schools 
were segregated. The irony of the sit- 
uation was that to gain their objective, 
these brethren should have insisted that 
white students be permitted to enroll in 
colored schools. To have any point 
their attack should have been leveled 
against a school such as Sewanee for not 
admitting Negroes. 

Racial segregation in the Church is 
obviously not in accord with the mind 
of the Master nor of St. Paul. All right- 
thinking Christians of the South realize 
this and are taking such steps as are 
warranted. Revolution, while sometimes 
necessary, is always to be deplored and 
is certainly not necessary here. The 
Church by moving as fast as it can is 
setting a wholesome example. It would 
surprise people of other sections to know 
how far Southern leaders in the Church 
have gone in this direction. We recall 
one saintly bishop, who, when a mem- 
ber of a congregation composed of both 
races always made it a point to kneel 
at the communion rail with a row of his 
colored children. 

We are glad that the majority of the 
members of the National Council agreed 



A Lenten Meditation On A Bishop's Chair 



By The Rev. W. C. Leach 

The most obvious thing that strikes the observer is that this chair was not 
designed with an eye to comfort. Made of gnarled rhododendron, every line is 
hard and unyielding, it is not a chair in which one can relax with a blissful sigh. 
Just as 'comfort' would not describe this chair, neither would 'comfort' be the apt 
word for the season of Lent. Lent is a time when some of the creature comforts of 
life are to be abstained from. Abstinence is not of itself a supremely valuable 
thing, but by an effort of the will we bring to mind that there are more important 
things than the satisfaction of our bodily desires. The mind and body are brought 
under discipline, oftimes uncomfortable discipline, in order that we may devote 
forty days to the strengthenng of our spiritual lives. We cannot relax in Lent, we 
dare not allow blissful contentment to steal over us when we should be directing 
our thoughts to the sufferings of Calvary. 

The back brace of the chair forms a roughly shaped cross. This cross should 
be a mute reminder of the Body that once hung on such a Cross, stretching out 
arms in agony that now stretch out to draw all men unto Him who allowed those 
arms to be wracked. Can we look on this chair with its cross without thinking of 
the love of God for men that sent His Son and permitted the Crucifixion so that 
men could recognize the ugliness of sin? We must look at the Cross during Lent. 

Looking again at the chair, we see that the cross upholds two arms that are 
topped by a mitre. Symbolic of the Church with the bishop at the head, one arm 
can represent to us the priesthood and the other the laity. K\\ three are supported 
by the Cross and depend for their strength on the power that flows from the Cross. 
Lent is a time for a renewal of our allegiance to the Church which Christ founded 
and continually supports. 

The chair throws a shadow. This shadow can remind us that the influence of 
the Christian religion must be made to reach out and touch all men just as the 
shadow of the chair reaches out to touch the wall. Lent is a season when we should 
extend even farther our missionary efforts through our sacrificial giving. 

The whole chair is bathed in light coming from the East window with the rising 
of the sun. For us, the Cross, the Church, the discomforts and discipline and 
sacrifices of Lent are made glorious by the triumph of Easter; all are bathed in 
the glory of the light of the Resurrection which proclaims the victory of Life over 
Death. 

that these Negro Institute Schools of segregation could not come in the im- 

should receive the aid that was promised mediate future and that it was therefore 

them. And we echo the words of our the duty of the Church to give her 

beloved retiring Presiding Bishop who Negro children the finest schools that it 

reminded the Council that the abolition could afford. 



Reverend George Floyd Rogers Retires 



The Rev. George Floyd Rogers, rector 
of Trinity Episcopal church for 20 years, 
announced to the congregation that he is 
retiring from the ministry. 

Mr. Rogers said he will continue as 
rector of the church until a successor 
can be named. 

. He stated that he is not very well and 
that he felt his retirement would be for 
the best interests of the church and of 
his health. He pointed out that he has 
passed the retirement age and that, 
physically, he is no longer capable of 
meeting the demands of the parish. 

Community Leader 

Since coming to Trinity church in 
April, 1926, Mr. Rogers has been very 
active in community affairs. He was 
particularly noted for his attention and 
assistance to those who were sick or in 
need regardless of their creed. 

Mr. Rogers is a past president of the 
Ministerial Association of Asheville and 
Buncombe county, having served three 
times in that capacity, chairman of the 
standing committee of the Episcopal 
diocese of Western North Carolina for 
many years, and a member of the Civ- 
itan club. He has been very active in 
Community Chest campaigns. 

He has been clerical delegate to a 
number of national conventions, includ- 
ing the last one at Philadelphia this year. 

Mr. Rogers came here from Charlotte, 
where he was rector of St. Peter's Epis- 
:opal church. 

Native of Virginia 

A native of Virginia, he graduated 
from the Virginia Theological seminary. 
Shortly after he entered the work of the 
church in that state, he became interest- 
ed in mission work and while rector at 
Hampton he established several missions 
in the hill country of that region. 

He is'the founder of Boys Home, Cov- 
ington, Va., one of the leading institu- 
tions of its kind in the Southeast. A 
brother, Dr. E. Reinhold Rogers, is op- 
erator and rector of the home. 



Mr. Rogers also organized the Vir- 
ginia Juvenile Protective society, serv- 
ing as its president for eight years. He 
served also as president of the Confer- 
ence of Charities and Correction of the 
Virginia. 

He served with a committee appointed 
by the governor of Virginia to promote 
proper morals for the state during World 
War I. He was for many years active 
in the development of Christian social 
service in the church and was connected 
with the department of religious educa- 
tion for some time. 

Mr. Rogers is at present the president 
of the Standing Committee, a member 
of the Executive Council and a member 
of the Ecclesiastical Court of the Dio- 
cese. 

A dinner honoring Mr. and Mrs. Rog- 
ers was held at the annual congregation- 
al meeting in the parish house of Trinity 
Church. 

The congregation presented Mr. and 
Mrs. Rogers with a silver service set in 
appreciation of the rector's 20 years' 
service to the church and talks were 
made by several persons. The presen- 
tation was made by George Shuford. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 
The circulation manager of the 
HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN, Mr. 
Charles Grigsby, reguests that ev- 
ery parish and mission send in a 
corrected and revised mailing list 
for the diocesan paper. It is most 
important that this mailing list be 
corrected as soon as possible, and 
the cooperation of the clergy is es- 
pecially solicited. It is unsound to 
continue to mail the paper to those 
who have died, moved away or are 
not bona fide subscribers. Mr. 
Grigsby's address is 440 Montford 
Ave., Asheville. 



Father Farnum, Rector of St. Mary's, To Retire 



Has Served More Than 42 Years In 
Episcopal Ministry 

The Rev. Arthur W. Farnum, who for 
the past 19 years has served as rector of 
St. Mary's, announced to members of 
his congregation yesterday morning that 
he will retire from the ministry on 
May 1. 

Father Farnum, who has completed 
more than 42 years in the ministry, came 
to Asheville in May, 1928, as rector of 
St. Mary's church. 

Native of Philadelphia 

A native of Philadelphia, Fr. Farnum 
came to the South in 1917 as rector of 
St. James church, Hendersonville. Upon 
the creation of the diocese of Western 
North Carolina in 1922, he was elected 
dean of the Waynesville (now x\sheville) 
convocation, which position he still 
holds. He was elected deputy to the 
general convention in 1922, 1925, and 
1943. 

He has served at various times on the 
executive council of the diocese and for 
a time in 1933 acted as chairman of the 
council. For a number of years he has 
been chaplain for the Central Labor 
union. 

Fr. Farnum graduated from the De- 
Lancey school in Philadelphia in 1895 
and for a time after his graduation was 
employed in the freight department of 
the Pennsylvania railroad. In 1900 he 
decided to follow the example of his dis- 
tinguished grandfather, the Rt. Rev. 
Henry B. Whipple, of Minnesota, and 
went to that state where he entered the 
Seabury Divinity school at Faribault 
from which he graduated in 1904, being 
ordained to the priesthood the same 
year. 

While attending the school he was 
awarded the Gilbert prize in English 
Bible .and the ; Whipple prize in Greek 
New Testament. 



In 1906 he married Miss Ellen Mar- 
tha Pendergast, of Hutchinson, Minn., 
where he was rector. From Hutchinson 
he went to St. Joseph, Mo., then to Kan- 
sas City, and later to St. Cloud and St. 
Paul, Minn., before becoming rector of 
the Hendersonville church. 

Fr. Farnum for a number of years 
was editor of the Highland Church- 
man, and has just resigned as editorial 
writer. 



In Memoriam 

Whereas the Great Ruler of the uni- 
verse, in the righteous dispensations of 
His Providence, has seen fit to call to 
rest Margaret Callier Brown (Mrs. H. 
T.), the beloved president of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church of Wilkesboro. 

Resolved, That we recognize in this 
sad dispensation the righteous hand of 
God and bow in submission to His will. 
That we deeply feel and regret the loss 
of our beloved friend whose sweet Chris- 
tian life gave to high purposes of our 
Auxiliary her clear vision, her courage, 
her firmness of purpose, her. convincing 
logic, her ability to succeed, bringing 
light into many dark places. We desire 
to testify to her beautiful Christian life 
and faithfulness to every duty. 

Resolved, that we extend to the be- 
reaved family and friends our sympathy. 
That these resolutions be spread upon 
the minutes of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of St. Paul's, published in the local 
newspapers and the Highland Church- 
man, and a copy sent to the family. 

Louise Lunn Cowles 
Frances H. Underwood 
.:.:.'; ;i Elizabeth Barber ■ ;/_" 
.- .: " . .'. Committee 



Woman's Auxiliary 

News 



Mrs. E. L. McKinsey, Diocesan Ad- 
vance Work Chairman, reports the Ad- 
vance Work Offerings from the various 
Districts to be as follows: 

First District $275.51 

Second District 59.60 

Third District 382.30 

Fourth District 83.64 

Fifth District 10.02 

This makes a total of $806.07, which 
is a generous expression of the interest 
the women have in the chapel to be 
built on the Cherokee Indian Reserva- 
tion. 

A great many friends and members 
of Trinity Parish, Asheville, joined the 
Woman's Auxiliary in making their An- 
nual Bazaar, held on November 26th, 
one of the most successful ever held. 
Thanksgiving dinner was served to 150 
during the evening. Sharing with Trinity 
Parish, and contributing greatly to the 
event were Grace Chapel, Asheville; 
Church of the Redeemer, Craggy Road; 
Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek; St. Mat- 
thias, Asheville; the Y.P.S.L., and the 
Sunday School of Trinity. 

The women of Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton, held a Christmas Bazaar on 
December 4th, and have reported it to 
have been a big success. Bazaars ac- 
complish a three-fold result — that of 
raising money for the many projects, 
that of promoting spirited work among 
the women of the Auxiliary, and, finally, 
that of creating good fellowship among 
all the denominations who attend. 

January is the time to begin laying 
plans for the 1947 Bazaars and the pro- 
ject is passed on to all the branches as 
being thoroughly rewarding. 

The women of the church are urged 
to begin now to plan for the World Day 



Mr. Redwood Reports 

Your Treasure rassumes that you de- 
sire some knowledge of the year's fin- 
ancial operations and there is given 
herewith a full report of all receipts from 
each parish and mission. You can com- 
pare with your neighbors and if your 
parish or mission seems to be in arrears, 
your Treasurer is still in a receptive 
mood and the money is still needed even 
if a little late. Verbum sapientis! 

In the near future we hope to publish 
the figures for 1947. We are asked for 
$8,500 for 1947 as against $7,000 for 
1946, and this last was not easy to raise. 
Only by your whole-hearted cooperation 
can we hope to meet this obligation. 

Please remember that stipends and 
other obligations are payable monthly 
and therefore monthly and quarterly 
payments are most helpful. 

The address of the Treasurer is chang- 
ed as below, please change your records 
accordingly and oblige, 

William M. Redwood 
20 Cedarcliff Road 
Biltmore Forest, N. C. 



of Prayer to be held on February 21st. 
This is another opportunity to help pro- 
mote real fellowship among the various 
denominations, by cooperating fully in 
this service. 

On December 5, 1946, the women of 
St. Mark's Church, Gastonia, sponsored 
that Church's annual Bazaar. In addi- 
tion to the Bazaar a reportedly very 
delicious spaghetti supper was served. 
At least it was a financial success be- 
cause the Woman's Auxiliary cleared 
over $400. The Bazaar, at which fancy 
work, cakes, cookies, etc., were sold, and 
the supper were held in the parish house. 

Mrs. Arthur Fuller was in charge of 
the event sponsored by the Woman's 
Auxiliary of which Mrs. L. O. McCollum 
is President. 

Bishop Gribbin was present at St. 
Mark's for an evening service, on De- 
cember 8, 1946. 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH 
CAROLINA FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS 

For The Year 1946 



On Assesst 


tent 


Made 


Paid 


$ 540.00 $ 


540.00 


144.00 


96.00 


48.00 




540.00 


540.00 


72.00 


72.00 


72.00 


72.00 


120.00 


120.00 


180.00 


180.00 


144.00 


144.00 


120.00 


120.00 


144.00 


144.00 


48.00 


48.00 


60.00 


60.00 


270.00 


270.00 


240.00 


240.00 


270.00 


isn.nn 


72.00 


72.no 


24.00 


24.00 


30.00 


30.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 


10.00 


io. on 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


30.00 




30.00 


30.00 


5.00 


5.00 


18.00 


18.00 


6.00 




io. no 




12.00 




12.00 


12.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


io.no 


in oo 


30.00 


30.00 


in.no 


10.00 


20.nn 


20.00 


10.00 




in.no 


10.00 


2o.nn 




in. oo 


lo.on 


io. on 


10.00 


io.no 




10.00 


10.00 


in.no 


10.00 


m.nn 




10.00 


10.00 


6n.no 


60. on 


12.00 


12.00 


12.00 




10.00 


10.00 


10.00 




8.00 




8.00 




12.00 


12.00 


lo.nn 


10.00 


6.nn 




12.00 


12.00 


io.no 


10.00 


6.00 




23,691.00 23 


217.00. 



On Apportionment 

PARISHES Accepted Paid 

Asheville, Trinity $ 2,236.88 $ 2,350.91 

Asheville, St. Man's 360.00 377.24 

Asheville, St. Matthias' 146.40 147.07 

Biltmore, All Souls' 1,460.00 1,501.58 

Brevard, St. Philip's 189.10 225.19 

Flat Rock. St. John's 183.00 144.00 

Fletcher, Calvary 402.60 480.00 

Gastonia. St. Mark's 737.22 769.25 

Hendersonville, St. James' 640.50 599.35 

Hickory. Ascension 244.00 250.00 

Lenoir, St. James' 475.80 604.44 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 292.80 209.35 

Marion, St. John's 161.04 169.68 

Morganton. Grace 1,098.00 1,300.00 

Rutherfordton. St. Francis' 624.64 505.75 

Trvon, Holy Cross 793.00 540.00 

Wavnesville. Grace 134.20 134.90 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 100.80 109.80 

ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Arden. Christ Church 79.30 79.30 

Asheville, The Redeemer 37.82 46.06 

Asheville, St. Luke's 22.57 46.55 

Asheville. Trinitv Chapel 45.14 65.06 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 19.52 7.00 

Bessemer City. St. Andrew's 15.25 17.26 

Black Mountain. St. James 152.50 2.76 

B'owing Rock. Stringfellow M. 63.44 63.44 

Boone. St. Luke's 18.30 18.30 

Canton. St. Andrew's 103.70 111.33 

Cullowhee. St. David's 7.93 

Ednevville. St. Paul's 22.59 28.50 

Franklin, St. Agnes' 91.50 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 15.25 37.09 

G'en Alpine. St. Paul's 19.52 23.01 

G'endale Springs. Holv Trinity 15.25 7.81 

Hieh Shoals. St. John's 19.52 19.52 

Highlands, Incarnation 152.50 152.50 

Hot Springs. St. John's 14.64 10.00 

Legerwood, Chanel of Rest 76.86 76.86 

Lncolnton. St. Cvprian's 18.20 

Lincoln. Woodside. Our Saviour 18.91 27.04 

Little Switzerland. Resurrection 30.50 

Morganton. St. Stephen's 18.30 26.90 

Murphv. Messiah 19.52 19.52 

Rutherfordton. St. Gabriel's 18.30 18.30 

Saluda, Transforation 81.74 81.74 

Shelby. The Redeemer 26.84 26.33 

Svlva, St. Tohn's 7.32 

Todd, St. Matthew's 7.93 lO.on 

Valle Crucis. Holv Cross 231.80 271.40 

Morganton. St. Mary's 18.30 74.47 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Asheville. Grace 24.40 28. nn 

Balsam. Holy Communion 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 

Blackston. Mission 

Cashiers. Good Shepherd 

Ednevville. St. Peter's 

Hillgirt. Mission 

Lenoir. Chapel of Peace 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Linco'nton. St. Stephen's 

Linvi'le, All Saints 

Micadale, St. Miry's ___. 

Morganton. St. E'izabeth's 

Penland, Good Shepherd 

Rutherfordton. Missions 

Upward. St. John Baptist 

Valle Crucis. St. John Baptist 

Tryon. Good Shepherd 

Cherokee, St. Francis 

GRAND TOTAL 



76.86 
6.85 
15.00 
10.37 


1 22 7 9 
"6.85 
20.00 


9.76 
14.00 
24.40 


13.00 


30.50 

7.93 

61.00 


84.13 

7.93 
65.71 


12.81 
10.00 


19.48 


212.080.70 


£12,192.05 



ASHEVILLE MISSIONS 

By Rev. J. B. Sill 



We shall speak of two of the Asheville 
Missions, for such they may be called 
today, the city having extended to their 
locations, one of them being, however, 
beyond the official city limits. Sixty 
years ago The Church of The Redeemer, 
on the French Broad River, in the 
Woodfin suburb, and Grace Church in 
the Grace suburb were several miles out 
in the country. It was about that time 
that the Church of The Redeemer was 
built, of the native granite, and that the 
Mission of Grace Church was improved 
by the erection of a rectory and steps 
taken towards the building of a new 
Church, also of stone, though it was not 
until 1906 that the Church was complet- 
ed. Both of these Churches are of Eng- 
lish Rural-Church architecture. 

In its early days Grace Church was 
a Mission of Trinity Parish. Mr. Frank 
J. Murdock, later rector of St. Luke's, 
Salisbury, and General J. G. Martin 
were interested in lay-reading at the 
Mission, in assisting Dr. Buxton, who 
was in charge of it. The Church was 
then a log-structure, built in 1867 on 
land given by Prof. John Kimberly, 
where the present Church is located. 
Miss Fanny Patton, Miss Kate Buxton, 
and General Martin's daughters taught 
in the Sunday School. The Kimberly 
family have ever since been staunch 
supporter of Grace Church. Promoting 
the building of the present Church, in 
addition to the Kimberly family, were 
Mrs. C. T. Chester and her daughter, 
Mrs. Chester Lyman. After 1891 and 
until about 1910 Grace Church was an 
organized mission, of the diocese of 
North Carolina at first, and then of the 
District, of Asheville. Rev. W. F. Rice 
had charge for some years, living at the 
rectory, then Rev. McNeely DuBose, of 
Trinity, was in charge, who was suc- 
ceeded by Rev. A. H. Stubbs. of the 
Ravenscroft Association. In 1896 there 
were 51 Communicants and 45 in the 
Sunday School, "Sunday evening ser- 



vices are well attended and much inter- 
est manifested in the A-lission" it being 
reported. In 1910 there were 60 Com- 
municants, 90 in the Sunday School 
and 48 families belonging to the Mis.sion. 

One who had lived a long life, Miss 
Rose Chapman, of Skyland, said in her 
later years that "the memories of Dr. 
and Mrs. Buxton, General Martin and 
Miss Fanny Patton are like the shadows 
of great rocks in a weary land, that 
stand for courage, hope and love." And 
of Miss Rebecca Kimberly she said "She 
had served the Mission over 60 years. 
It is good for us to pause and think of 
the steadfastness and constancy, the loy- 
alty and devotion which characterizes 
one who has served in a particular field 
so long. The influence of her life and 
work here is incalculable and unending." 
The days of which we are writing were 
still those of the horse and buggy, autos 
coming in after 1900, and the first elec- 
tric street cars in Asheville only shortly 
before then. So a picture of a devout 
soul, none other than Mrs. Eveline Cole- 
man, one of the two first members of 
trinity, Asheville, in her getting to Grace 
Mission in its early days may not be 
amiss. As I have been told "She was 
short and stout, always wore black and 
a funny little black sunbonnet. She 
lived near Weaverville, about 8 miles 
from the Mission, and on the Sunday 
afternoons that Dr. Buxton held service 
there she used to come riding horseback 
or muleback." 

(To Be Continued) 



CHANGES IN CANONS 

Bishop Gribbin has appointed the 
Rev. J. P. Burke acting chairman of the 
Committee on Constitutions and Can- 
ons. All suggestions for changes must 
be referred to the Committee in order 
that changes may be presented at the 
Diocesan Convention. 



Reconstruction and 
Advance 

The Highland Churchman had hop- 
ed to be able to print a complete parish- 
by-parish report of the totals received 
in the Diocese. It did not prove feasible 
to do so, but Mr. W. H. Stewart was 
able to give a most encouraging report 
for the Diocese as a whole. From spe- 
cial gifts and the offerings through the 
envelope system used throughout the 
Diocese, the total was $23,443.19. 

The Diocese is indebted to Mr. Stew- 
are for his untiring labors and effort in 
leading the churches and people of the 
Diocese. Mr. Stewart received the fol- 
lowing letter from Presiding Bishop 
Tucker which speaks for itself: 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDING 
BISHOP 

New York City 

November 19, 1946 
Mr. H. W. Stewart 
40 Edgemont Road 
Asheville, N. C. 

Dear Mr. Stewart: 

The measure of success attained by 
the Reconstruction and Advance Fund 
was due in a very high degree to the 
persistent loyal work of the diocesan 
chairmen. As one of that group, I want 
to send you a very personal word of 
thanks and appreciation. 

When at the great Opening Service of 
the General Convention, I presented 
that offering at the altar and announced 
its total, I rejoiced that the Episcopal 
Church had responded so finely to the 
opportunity opening up before it on ev- 
ery side. Our Far Eastern Commission 
is now in the Orient securing first hand 
information as to where best we can use 
our Reconstruction and Advance funds 
in that area. As we are able to meet the 
various needs we shall give thanks anew 
that the means have been made avail- 
able through the efforts of a determined 
people under such leadership as yours. 
Faithfully yours, 

..:'- H. St. George Tucker 

Presiding Bishop 



DIOCESAN NEWS 

INSTALLATION OF PRESIDING 
BISHOP 

Mrs. Thomas Wright of the Church 
of the Redeemer represented the diocese 
at the installation of the Most Rev. Hen- 
ry Knox Sherril as the Presiding Bishop 
of the Episcopal Church at the Wash- 
ington Cathedral on January 14th. Mrs. 
Wright was also a guest at the reception 
for the new presiding bishop following 
the installation. 

The Rev. A. Rufus Morgan was the 
clerical representative from the diocese 
at the installation to which every diocese 
had been asked to send one clerical and 
one lay representative. 



HOLY CROSS, VALLE CRUCIS 

At the annual congregational meeting, 
an increased budget was adopted, it was 
announced that new work in connection 
with Valle Crucis was being started at 
Banner Elk, and a new mission commit- 
tee was elected. The new committee 
consists of: Messrs. Ernest Townsend, 
Malcolm Glovier, L. F. Townsend and 
Mrs. J. W. Davis and Miss Rosalind 
Ragsdale, Treasurer. 



SAINT MARY'S SHARES IN ENDOW- 
MENT TRUST ESTABLISHED BY 
IAMES A. GRAY OF 
WINSTON-SALEM 

Saint Mary's School and Junior Col- 
lege has been advised by Mr. James A. 
Gray, Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Com- 
pany, Winston-Salem, that the school 
has been included in the endowment 
trust fund recently established by Mr. 
Gray. 

The trust foundation established in 
the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company 
benefits ten other North Carolina insti- 
tutions. The income from Reynolds 
stock, valued at approximately $25,000, 
will be available to Saint Mary's for the 
advancement of teaching. This gift in- 
creases the endowment fund of the 
school by $25,000. 



YOUNG CHURCHMEN NEWS 



By Ann Shuford 



BESSEMER CITY 

Since the coming of Miss Patricia 
Page last summer, the youth group at 
St. Andrew's has begun to do things in 
a big way. Many interesting programs 
and activities have occupied the group 
during the past several months. One of 
the most interesting programs was a talk 
by a Japanese-American student from 
Chapel Hill who told of her experiences 
in a relocation center. (Ed. note: 
American euphemism for "concentration 
camp".) 

For Christmas the club gave a Christ- 
mas pageant and on January 9th the 
"Feast of Lights" service climaxed the 
season's activities. 

MORGANTON 

New group leaders, Misses Avis Ann 
Oehlbeck and Francie Lyman, were 
elected January 5th to serve until June. 

On the night of December 23rd, the 
Y.P.S.L. and the Sunday School pre- 
sented a Christmas pageant. 

VALLE CRUCIS— BANNER ELK 

Christmas-tide called each and every- 
one to service. The Girl Scouts of Ban- 
ner Elk served as the choir at Holy 
Cross, Valle Crucis, on the first Sunday 
after Christmas. On Christmas Day. 
the Girls' Friendly formed the choir and 
a member of the boys' club served as 
acolyte and thurifer. The party for the 
children on Christmas Eve was success- 
ful with a trimmed tree and gifts for all. 

BOONE 

At St. Luke's there is a very interest- 
ing youth group called the Canterbury 
Club. This is a college club and yet it 
has as one of its fourteen members a 
high school student. The club publishes 
a weekly paper called The Canterbury 
Tales which carries church announce- 
ments for the week, editorials, features 
and a gossip column. The club hopes 
to feature several programs before Lent. 
All take part in the choir and sing for 
special church services. 



FLETCHER 

On December 19th at 10:30 A. M. two 

hundred and thirty children gathered at 
Calvary Church for their annual Christ- 
mas tree. One group of the club decor- 
ated the tree which was surrounded with 
gifts wrapped and brought by another 
group. In the chancel was a set scene 
of the Holy Family. 

The choir for the Christmas Eve mid- 
night service was made up of 44 young 
people. 

An Epiphany pageant was combined 
with a candlelight service on the Sunday 
after Epiphany. The service was start- 
ed at 5:30 so that the candlelight part 
came at dusk and the beauty and sym- 
bolism of the service was not lost. 

"PLAN", the suggested program 
drawn up for youth groups, calls for 
Inter-Church Youth Week and Race Re- 
lations Sunday and the beginning of 
study for Lent. Our Diocesan Youth 
Commission urges all young people of 
the Diocese to participate in these sug- 
gested activities during February and 
Lent. 

ST. JOHN'S, MARION 

Christmas was a blessed and happy- 
one in St. John's. On the Sunday night 
before the Festival the children of the 
Sunday School rendered a series, of 
tableaux in the church in the presence 
of a large congregation. The tableaux 
were as follows: Zacharias in the Tem- 
ple, the Annunciation to the Blessed 
Virgin, The Shepherds in the Field, the 
Nativity and visit of the Wise Men, and 
the Flight into Egypt. 

A Children's Choir has been started 
which gives great promise. They sing 
at all the services, and did themselves 
proud at the Midnight Mass on Christ- 
mas Eve. The church was packed for 
this service. Ten children received spe- 
cial gifts for perfect attendance at Sun- 
day School during the year. 



10 



Morganton Convocation 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Sanborn, 
formerly of Trinity Parish, Asheville, 
are now living in Penland and employed 
at the Appalachian School. Mr. San- 
born has been a Lay Reader in the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina for 
many years, and has many friends 
throughout the Diocese. 

The Rev. William C. Cravner, well 
known and beloved in the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina as a former 
Rector of All Souls', Biltmore, is now 
preaching as locum tenens at St. Mark's, 
Gastonia. 

There have been several younger mar- 
ried couples who are Churchmen and 
who have moved to Lenoir. Recently 
they conferred with the Rector, the Rev. 
B. M. Lackey, and are organizing a 
Bible Class for adults in St. James' 
Church School. Editorial Comment to 
other younger married couples in our 
parishes and missions: — "Go, and do 
thou likewise!" 

At the time the Highland Church- 
man goes to press the Rev. Samuel B. 
Stroup, Rector of Ascension Church, 
Hickory, is critically ill. He suffered a 
stroke January 9th, and has been con- 
fined to his bed since that time. His 
son, the Rev. D. J. Stroup, formerly at 
Redeemer, Asheville, and at present 
Rector of Epiphany, Rensselaer, N. Y., 
returned to Hickory January 17th to be 
with his father during his illness. 

The Convocation of Morganton is 
meeting in St. James' Church, Lenoir, 
February 12th, at 10:30 A. M. Follow- 
ing the celebration of Holy Communion 
the Rev. Joseph S. Huske, Jr., Rector 
of St. Luke's, Lincolnton, will conduct 
a meditation for the clergy in prepara- 
tion for Lent. The afternoon session is 
to be given over to reports and general 
discussion by the clergy of the Morgan- 
ton Convocation. 



Question Box 



How Can I Find Out What The New 
Marriage Lazvs of Our Church Are? 

A fifteen page booklet containing these 
laws has just been printed by the More- 
house-Gorham Co., 14 East 41st St., 
New York. It also contains a list of 
suggested readings on marriage; books 
and pamphlets. Bishop Gribbin has 
mailed copies of this booklet to his cler- 
gy. Ask your rector! 

What Is The Purpose of Convoca- 
tions? Do All Dioceses Have Them? 

No, all dioceses do not have convoca- 
tions. Our Diocese has two: the Con- 
vocation of Asheville and the Convoca- 
tion of Morganton. Each of these elects 
a Dean annually. Dean Farnum is the 
Dean of the Asheville Convocation and 
Dean Lackey of Lenoir is the Dean of 
the Morganton Convocation. 

Section 4 of Canon 16 (our diocesan 
canons) reads as follows: "The objects 
of the Convocation shall be: To devise 
plans for the extension of the Church 
within the limits of the Convocation; to 
afford an opportunity for the Clergy and 
laity to come together for conference; to 
hold public services for discussions of 
religious topics of general interest." 

The meetings of the Convocation are 
open to all; laity as well as the clergy. 
It is enheartening to note that these 
meetings are being more widely attend- 
ed than formerly, especially by the laity. 
The best way to catch the spirit and pur- 
pose of Convocation is to attend. 



Mrs. N. E. Van Tuyl, mother of the 
late Mrs. A. P. Mack, died of pneumonia 
in Marion General Hospital on January 
13th. The funeral was held in the 
church on the 15th. Fr. Lambert, of 
Penland, celebrated the Requiem Mass, 
Fr. Webster, of Rutherfordton, read the 
Burial Office, and Fr. Rhys, of Black 
Mountain, said the Committal at the 
grave. ... __ 



11- 



Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



A CREATIVE ARTIST INTERPRETS 
THE CREATOR 

"The Mind of the Maker" by Dorothy 
Sayers. Harcourt, Brace: $2.00. 

For a living Miss Sayers writes detec- 
tive stories, which are usually first pub- 
lished in her native England but also 
enjoy a large sale in America. They are 
just about perfect in their kind. She 
has also written plays which are good 
to read or to act. Yet it's likely that her 
greatest interest in life is the welfare of 
the Church. She holds an outstanding 
place among the English laity. And she 
gives of her time and talent to explain 
the nature of God and His Religion in 
ways that will be appreciated by those 
who read her stories. 

In tracts and pamphlets her striking 
and incisive style expresses what we 
know already better than we had ever 
thought of saying it. But when she 
tackles the interpretation of the dogmas 
of Creation and the Trinity, she gives 
the impression that for all future time 
these subjects should not be approached 
by anyone who had not proved creative 



ability by producing a novel, a sym- 
phony, or some outstanding work of art. 

For the analogy is drawn between the 
creative action of man and of God, which 
is probably the most effective explana- 
tion that can be given in human terms. 
And no one can understand the creative 
action of man so well as the person who 
engages in it. The treatment of the 
theme here is at once scientific, convinc- 
ing, and easy to follow. The sole reason 
why this review has not appeared earlier 
is because, during the war and im- 
mediate post-war periods, English pub- 
lications have not been too readily avail- 
able in America. 



OUR CHURCH IN THE MODERN 
WORLD 

"Liturgy and Society" by A. G. Hebert 
(Society of the Sacred Mission) 

Probably all of us at times grow dis- 
couraged because our Church persists in 
neglecting what we feel sure would com- 
pletely restore her effectiveness. And 
none of us has greater justification for 
doing so than the members of our Re- 
ligious Orders which we so commonly 
neglect. Thus when a member of one 
of those same Orders publishes a book 
which faces all the real or imagined de- 



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Pisgah Forest 
North Carolina 



MAKERS OF 

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fects of the Anglican Communion, and 
recognises them frankly, and yet leaves 
us with a reasoned defence of our 
Church that can stand up to any argu- 
ment, we feel a satisfaction greater than 
we can express. 

Of course the reader of this book must 
expect to find plenty of his own preju- 
dices shown to be without foundation, 
and many of his own pet theories of 
religion disproved. And Father Hebert 
is a scholar who knows, as well as the 
most informed of his readers ever will, 
the customs and faith of the earliest gen- 
erations of Christians. There is prac- 
tically no possibility of appeal from his 
judgement. 

In substance what he shows is this. 
The real life of God's Church does not 
consist in any form of personal religion. 
Personal devotion can never be a sub- 
stitute for corporate religion. The real 
life of God's Church does not consist in 
any system of dogma. The revelation 
of God is a fact rather than a doctrine. 
The real life of God's Church centres in 
Her worship. And so long as that is 
basically true to Christ's intention, God 
will be with us. Father Hebert finds the 
Anglican Communion a satisfactory spir- 
itual home because we hold to truth 
rather than truths, because of "a deep 
faith in the Church herself and not 
merely in a system of belief". On that 
charter all of us can stand. 



CONVOCATION OF ASHEVILLE 

The Convocation will meet at St. 
James, Hendersonville, on February 11 
and 12. The main items on its agenda 
are as follows: 

1. Election of a Dean. 

2. Paper by the Rev. Frank A. Say- 
lor on "The Book of Common Prayer 
in a Rural Field". 

3. "Reflections of a Hospital Chap- 
lain" by the Rev. J. Howard Rhys. 

4. Pre-Lenten Quiet Day conducted 
by the retiring Dean, Fr. Farnum, who 
has served in this capacity since 1922. 



Your Church Book Store 
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we have been the shopping cen- 
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for Episcopal families. 

Write us for anything you need. 
Expert attention by a trained staff will 
be given to your inquiries. 
BIBLES — PRAYER BOOKS — HYMNALS 

CROSSES — CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

ALL RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS FOR 

THE EPSCOPAL CHURCH 

Catalogs on request 

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14 E. 41st St. New York 17. N. Y. 




Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



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Phone 7167-7168 



13 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
fi\e Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 



WM STUDIOS OF 

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ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 

Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President. Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at B elk's 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY DIOCESE OF 
WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA AD- 
VANCE WORK OFFERING 1946 

First District 

Trinity— Asheville $ 91.75 

Asheville — Grace Mission (included 
with Trinity's) 

Asheville — Trinity Chapel, Haw Creek 2.00 

Asheville — Redeemer 5.11 

Biltmore— All Souls 138.00 

Black Mountain — St. James 

Canton — St. Andrews 12.00 

Fletcher — Calvary 16.20 

Franklin — St. Agnes 7.00 

Murphy — Church of the Messiah 

Highlands — Incarnation 

Waynesville — Grace 3.45 

Total $275.51 

Second District 

Bat Cace — Transfiguration $ 15.25 

Brevard — St. Phillips 

Edneyville— St. Pauls 28.35 

Hendersonville — St. James 

Saluda — Transfiguration 

Tryon — Holy Cross 12.00 

Upward — St. John the Baptist 4.00 

Total $ 59.60 

Third District 

Boone — St. Luke's 

Glendale Springs — Holy Trinity $ 15.55 

Hickory — Ascension 

Legerwood — Chapel of Rest 3.00 

Lenoir — St. James 16.75 

Marion — St. John's 5.00 

Morganton — Grace 283.00 

Morganton — St. Mary's, Quaker Meadows 6.00 

Valle Crucis — Holy Cross 53.00 

Wilkesboro — St. Paul's 

Total $377.30 

Fourth District 

Gastonia — St. Mark's $ 34.14 

High Shoals— St. John's 5.00 

Lincolnton — Church of Our Saviour, 

Woodside 

Lincolnton — St. Luke's 7.00 

Rutherfordton — St. Francis 37.50 

Shelby — The Redeemer 

Total $ 83.64 

Fifth District 

Asheville— St. Matthias $ 3.00 

Franklin — St. Cyprian's 7.02 

Morganton — St. Stephen's 

Rutherfordton — St. Gabriel's 

Tryon — Good Shepherd 

Total $ 10.02 

Total for the Diocese $806.07 

Given to help build the Church of St. Francis 
of Assisi, Cherokee Indian Reservation. 

14 



"Spiritual Success, 
Financial Failure" 

The radio venture of the Department 
of Promotion proved to be 100 per cent 
financial failure, although some persons 
expressed oral appreciation of the six 
10:00 A. M. Sunday broadcasts over 
Asheville's Station WNCA this fall. Sev- 
eral Diocesan clergy, including the Bish- 
op, broadcast these services. It was a 
continuation of "The Episcopal Radio 
Hour" inaugurated by the Rev. D. J. 
Stroup at his request when he left this 
Diocese. His program had been self- 
supporting. Hoping the Department of 
Promotion's radio venture would also 
support itself, one lay member of the 
Department contributed generously to 
underwrite the series of six broadcasts; 
the remainder were underwritten indis- 
creetly by one clergyman's "Discretion- 
ary Fund." 

We feel that perhaps we failed to give 
proper written publicity, and failed to 
appeal sufficiently for money from those 
interested in such a venture. We there- 
fore hereby make it plain that we shall 
go back on the air if and when contri- 
butions sufficient for a series of six 
broadcasts are sent for "The Episcopal 
Radio Hour" to Mr. V. Jordan Brown, 
Asheville Mica Company, Biltmore, X. 
C. Each broadcast costs $12.72. Mr. 
Brown is in charge of this phase of the 
Department's work. 



NEW VESTRIES 

Trinity Church, Asheville 

Julian Woodcock, Jordan Brown, 
Fuller Brown, George Shuford, Lavon 
Sarafian, W. G. Adams, Girard E. Hav- 
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Witt Clark, Arthur Jones, John Sim- 
mons, Lawrence Holt, Walter Bearden 
and Dr. Wallace Matthews. 

St. Mary's, Asheville 

E. A. Heers, Thomas Talmadge, For- 
rest B. Wood, Wayne Currier, Dr. 
James Johnston, and R. Howard Perry. 



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DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



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Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

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15 



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"Feast of Lights" at 
Redeemer 

The spread of Christianity was illus- 
trated by a candlelight service of "The 
Feast of Lights" at the Church of the 
Redeemer. The service was conducted 
by Fr. Greenwood, the priest-in-charge. 

The Eternal Trinity was represented 
by three-fold candles burning on the 
altar throughout the service. From 
these, one large candle representing 
Christ the Light of the World was lit. 
Next to be lit were three candles repre- 
senting the wise men who brought their 



gifts to the Infant Jesus and in turn 
received His light. 

After the reading of the appointment 
of the Apostles from the Gospel accord- 
ing to St. Matthew, 12 candles repre- 
senting each of the Apostles was lighted. 

A candle was then lighted from one 
of the Apostles candles for the bishops 
and from the bishop's candle, a candle 
for the priests. Taking light from the 
priest's candle, the acolytes went down 
the aisle lighting a candle in each pew. 
Members of the congregation then light- 
ed their candles one from another, rep- 
resenting the ministry of all people to 
share in bringing the Light of Christ to 
all men. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



tMitghlanti 
C()tttcl)tnan 

The Official Publication at the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



MARCH, 1947 



NO. 10 



., :m ;.'v, 









M?i'SK\ Willi 

"i Mil .J^Eft!&«l 






-Photo Courtesy Payne-Spiers Studios. 



The Crucifixion 



Qltjurrijman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, SOc a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



World Relief 

At first glance it would look as if the 
Church has laid a great burden on her- 
self by setting a goal of a million dollars 
a year for the Presiding Bishop's Fund 
for World Relief. It is not a great 
burden. Christians cannot say that the 
burden is too great when the task is one 
of carrying out our blessed Lord's com- 
mand to feed the hungry and clothe the 
naked. If we are honest, and take our 
Lord's words seriously, we know that 
a million dollars is far too little in the 
present situation. It is only because our 
Church is joining with other members 
of the World Council of Churches in 
raising a total of twelve million dollars 
a year that we can rest the least bit easy. 

Even in the times of our greatest 
necessity in America we have never had 
to face the situation that confronts the 
population of most of the rest of the 
world. People in American cities have 
never died by the hundreds every day of 
starvation, lack of medical attention, and 
exposure. But at this moment hundreds 
of our fellow human beings are so dy- 



ing, and hundreds more will die tomor- 
row unless the Christian churches of 
America do something about it. 

The instrument we have at hand is 
world relief administered by the World 
Council of Churches. This is not stop- 
gap relief, designed simply to fill stom- 
achs and clothe bodies. It is the organ- 
ized attempt on the part of the Christian 
Church to prevent the degeneration of 
the bodies and souls of a whole gener- 
ation. Funds for relief will be adminis- 
tered directly through the churches by 
individual pastors; there will be no offi- 
cial red-tape and the horrible misuse 
of funds and supplies that has marked 
so many attempts on the part of govern- 
ments to administer relief. 

Many churches in the Diocese have 
made plans already for doing their share 
in raising the million dollars our Church 
has pledged. A good number of the 
parishes and missions are going to de- 
vote the Easter Offering to the Presiding 
Bishop's Fund. Others will make a con- 
tribution at some other time. But no 
matter what the means or the time, the 
important thing is that a generous con- 
tribution be made before May 25th. 

A million dolars is a great deal of 
money . It is not so much that we can- 
not raise it. After all, it figures out to 
45 cents per member. If every commun- 
icant in the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina will give 45 cents, we will suc- 
ceed in doing just our share. We should 
all do more. 



Father Farnum 

Father Farnum's retirement from St. 
Mary's Asheville, and the active ministry 
will leave a large gap in the ranks of the 
Diocese. We need to mention only a few 
of his activities to see how much he will 
be missed. As Dean of the Convoca- 
tion of Asheville for 25 years, he gave 
inspired leadership to meetings that were 
outstanding for their interest. As some- 
time editor of the Highland Church- 
man, he spread the news of the work of 
the Diocese far and near; nor has he 
{Continued on Page 8) 



Church To Give Million For World Relief 



The Episcopal Church is asking its members to give, within the next few weeks, 
a minimum sum of one million dollars to be expended immediately for relief of 
needy peoples in Europe and Asia. This sum represents the first of three million 
that the Church has determined to raise in 1947, 1948 and 1949. The following 
is an official statement on the need for this Presiding Bishop's Fund for World 
Relief: 

It is more than mere Christian compassion for the sufferings of our fellow men 
that spurs our contribution to world relief today. The very nature of the relief that 
is needed makes this peculiarly a task for Churchmen. 

Meeting the physical needs of the war victims is not enough. The most dire 
needs of people in all the wartorn countries are spiritual ones. Besides the homes 
and factories and churches that have been destroyed, the farmlands that have been 
rendered useless, the food supplies that have been cut off, there are wounded spirits 
and scarred souls to be healed. The moral conscience of whole countries must be 
reawakened and this is the solemn obligation of the Christian Churches. 

To be sure, physical needs must be met first. A man who is starving, whose 
children are dying for lack of food, does not pause to consider the moral issue in- 
volved when he has the opportunity to steal some bread. This man, his children, 
all his neighbors must have food. In all probability they desperately need clothing 
too. And medicines. But the relief must not stop there. These people — they are 
to be found in most countries of Europe and many of Asia — need religious guidance, 
the opportunity to worship, the services of a Christian clergyman, healthy oppor- 
tunities for study and recreation. 

Convinced that world relief in all its aspects is an obligation belonging expressly 
to the Churches, believing, too, that this relief must be administered on the basis of 
need and not sect, the Churches have banded together in Church World Service, a 
cooperative effort to raise funds and to send help to the places of greatest need. 
Episcopal Churchmen take part in this cooperative effort through their contribu- 
tions to the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Relief. Church World Service 
administers relief through two agencies: World Council of Churches in Europe 
and the National Christian Councils in Asia. 

Episcopal contributions in 1946 amounted to $825,000, money that is already 
at work helping to relieve the suffering in war-ravaged countries. But a tremen- 
dous and desperate need still remains. To help meet this continuing need the 
Church is raising $1,000,000 during each of the next three years, 1947, 1948, and 
1949. 

The Episcopal Church and World Relief 

The Episcopal Church through bishops, clergy, and laity is represented in the 
policy-making and distribution program which clears through Church World Ser- 
vice and operates under the supervision of the World Council of Churches in 
Europe and the. National Christian Councils in Asia. Through Sister Churches we 
are further related to the relief program in all countries. 

Harper Sibley is president of Church World Service, Mrs. Henry Hill Pierce 
and the Rev. Almon R. Pepper are on its executive board. Mrs. Arthur M. Sher- 
man, Robert D. Jordan, the Rev. Edward R. Hardy, and Paul B. Anderson serve on 

3 



various committees. Two Churchmen, Miss Hazel Ormsbee and the Rev. Benjamin 
T. Brodie, are members of its staff. 

In Europe the Rt. Rev. J. I. B. Larned and Mr. Anderson serve on World 
Council relief committees as do representatives of the Church of England and the 
Eastern Orthodox Churches. The Rev. Raymond E Maxwell of St. Louis is a 
World Council field worker in the French Zone of Germany, and the Rev. Edward 
Every, of the English Church, in Greece. The Archbishop of Greece and the 
Metropolitan of Crete are chairmen of the World Council Reconstruction Commit- 
tees in their countries. 

In Asia, national Churches of the Anglican Communion are represented on the 
National Christian Councils in every country. Thus, Bishops Roberts, Craghill, 
and Gilman are prominently associated with the American Advisory Committee in 
China, and Archdeacon Walworth Tyng, and the Rev. Kimber Den are in charge 
of relief distribution through the Episcopal missions in their respective areas. 

The Anglican Churches in the British Isles, Canada, Australia, and New Zea- 
land are all particiapting members in the coordinating agencies which are the 
counterpart of Church World Service in their countries. 

A Message from the Presiding Bishop 

The Presiding Bishop, the Most Rev. Henry K. Sherril, has issued the following 
statement over his signature concerning the importance of the current campaign to 
raise one million dollars for world relief. 

"The importance of the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Relief cannot be 
over-emphasized. Millions of people are in desperate need. Here is an opportunity 
to meet in part this tragic situation in the name of Christ and the Church. The 
authority for this appeal rests upon the unanimous action of General Convention. 
But there is greater authority: the example and the words of our Master. As the 
first Epistle of St. John declares: 'But whoso has this world's good, and seeth his 
brother have need, and shutteth up his bozvels of compassion from him, how dwell- 
eth the love of God in him?' Here is an appeal to heart and conscience. This is 
Christianity in practice." 

World Relief Plans In The Diocese 

Plans are now being made in the Diocese for raising part of the million dollars 
the Church is asking for the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Relief. Portfolios 
containing information on the conduct of the campaign as well as samples of the 
materials that may prove useful have been sent to all the clergy. Among the sug- 
gested material available are offering envelopes with a picture on them of the first 
"displaced persons" mentioned in the New Testament — the Holy Family fleeing for 
safety into Egypt. 

Already a good number of parishes and missions in the Diocese, through their 
clergy, have indicated their willingness to devote the Easter offering to World Re- 
lief. Other parishes and missions that do not find this possible are planning to 
ask for an offering at a later date. It is hoped that the whole diocesan-wide cam- 
paign will be brought to a close by May 25th. It should be understood that this 

4 



Morganton Convocation 
Clergy Meet 

Most of the clergy of the Convocation 
of Morganton met for a Pre-Lenten 
service of worship and meditation at St. 
James' Church, Lenoir on February 
12th. The meeting began with a cele- 
bration of Holy Communion at 10:30 
a. m., with the Dean of the Convocation, 
the Rev. B. M. Lackey, as celebrant. 
Following the service, the Rev. J. S. 
Huske, rector of St. Luke's, Lincolnton, 
conducted a meditation for the clergy. 

Luncheon was served by the ladies of 
the parish and was followed by a round 
table discussion of topics of interest to 
the Convocation and the Diocese as a 
whole. 

As this meeting was not a regular 
meeting of the Convocation with the 
laity represented, there was no election 
of a Dean. It was suggested and ap- 
proved that adult delegates be secured 
for a meeting at the time of the presen- 
tation of the mite boxes. In this con- 
nection, the presentation service was 
fixed for Saturday, April 19th at 11 a. m. 
at Grace Church, Morganton. Each 
delegation will bring picnic dinners. A 
movie will be shown in the parish house 
following dinner. 

The Rev. W. C. Leach presented the 
matter of planning for the campaign 
within the Diocese for the Presiding 



Bishop's Fund for World Relief. After 
some discussion, the clergy who were 
present agreed to ask their congrega- 
tions to devote the Easter offering this 
year to World Relief. It was recom- 
mended that the clergy of the Convoca- 
tion of Asheville be apprised of this 
plan. It was taken into consideration 
that this plan would mean that the large 
offerings of Easter, counted upon rather 
heavily by many parishes, would repre- 
sent real sacrificial giving. 

After discussion of various other 
topics of interest, the Dean brought the 
meeting to a close with prayer. Special 
prayers were said for the Rev. S. B. 
Stroup and a message was directed to be 
sent to him in his illness. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 
The circulation manager of the 
HIGHLAND CHURCHMAN, Mr. 
Charles Grigsby, requests that ev- 
ery parish and mission send in a 
corrected and revised mailing list 
for the diocesan paper. It is most 
important that this mailing list be 
corrected as soon as possible, and 
the cooperation of the clergy is es- 
pecially solicited. It is unsound to 
continue to mail the paper to those 
who have died, moved away or are 
not bona fide subscribers. Mr. 
Grigsby's address is 440 Montford 
Ave., Asheville. 



does not mean that further contributions by individuals or parishes throughout 
the year are not hoped for. 

No definite quota has been set by the National Council for the Diocese, but it 
is suggested that one-half of the mathematical quota of each diocese and missionary 
district would be a good basis for figuring what each diocesan share would be. 
Each parish and mission within the Diocese will soon receive a quota that will be 
of help in setting a definite goal within that parish or mission. 

A 16 mm. sound motion picture is available for showing within the Diocese for 
those parishes that would like to use it in connection with their campaign. Entitled 
''Not By Bread Alone", this picture was filmed in Europe and sets forth the need 
of Europe's neediest cases and shows how that need is being met by the World 
Council of Churches. Where projectors are available, this film can be secured by 
writing the Highland Churchman, Box 55, Valle Crucis. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Elizabeth Van Noppen 



St. Cyprian's, Franklin, is enjoying 
three services weekly during Lent under 
the direction of the Rev. Rufus Morgan, 
and expect to have the Archdeacon 
Kennedy sometime during the Lenten 
season. 



The Chapel of Rest, Legerwood, had 
the good fortune to have Miss Jean 
Hanson, former Red Cross worker in 
Burma, to speak at their Lenten study 
of India. 



The Woman's Auxiliary of St. Matth- 
ias and the Missionary Group from 
Calvary Presbyterian Church will have 
joint Lenten study. 



The Woman's Auxiliary of Trinity 
Church, Asheville, will join with the 
Auxiliary of All Soul's, Biltmore, in 
Lenten study classes each Monday, to 
be conducted by the Rev. Isaac Northup, 
of All Soul's. The subject to be studied 
will be "The Life of Christ". 



Mrs. Arthur Sherman, Executive Sec- 
retary of the Woman's Auxiliary who 
had returned from her trip to the Orient 
only two days previous shared with the 
Board some of her experiences and ob- 
servations during those two months. She 
traveled 18,500 miles, most of it in a 
jeep. The National Council recorded 
its deep appreciation of the cooperation 
of General McArthur in furthering the 
visit of the Far Eastern Commission to 
the Orient. 



Some interesting new publications, 
recommended as worthwhile for reading 
and study are: 

"Behold the City of God" by Bishop 
Dunn. 



"The Strength to Build" a Triennial 
Report. 

"Unto God's City" a meditation on the 
U.T.O. Service. 

"Tell Us About Supply Work." 

"Women's Work In The Church" a 
dramatization on the recruiting of wo- 
men for work in the Church. 



The folowing interesting report was 
received from Mrs. Eloise McKinsey, 
the U.T.O. worker in Glendale Springs: 

Poor little Holy Trinity Mission! 
With every change of workers (and 
there have been many) its policy and 
emphasis changes. No wonder it has 
not shown a steady, healthy growth. 
Its fortunes are at a low ebb now if we 
think only of the baptized and confirmed 
members. The new priest-in-charge, the 
Rev. James McKeown, will have the 
doubtful satisfaction of building from 
the ground up. 

If I had to measure the worth of my 
service here during the past nineteen 
months by the response of the Episco- 
palians, I should certainly be looking 
for another place to work. On my ar- 
rival in June, 1945, an eager group of 
girls greeted me with the question, "Are 
you going to have Girls' Friendly:" 
Naturally the answer was "Yes", and 
that little group has grown and grows 
continuously. And how the individuals 
have grown! From timid children who 
felt no confidence in their ability to do 
the simplest handicrafts, they have pro- 
gressed to the point where they will at- 
tempt, and accomplish, anything sugges- 
ted. They have written songs and 
prayers, planned worship services, learn- 
ed about health and "manners" and 
sportsmanship and broadened their 
horizons amazingly. Mondays find them 
at the Mission House, but Sundays find 



them in the Presbyterian and Baptist 
churches. 

Certain little brothers came so regular- 
ly to GFS that this Fall I announced that 
we would form a Boys' Club for boys 
up to 9. That was so successful that the 
older boys couldn't keep away, so now 
we have a Big Boys' Club, also. Both 
groups specialize in wood-working. 

Our weekly Library Hour is import- 
ant, I feel, as it is almost the only source 
of reading matter for the school children. 
Hundreds of books are read during a 
year. 

Though my real reason for staying 
here is the work with the children, there 
are other bright spots in the picture. 
While I was away last summer, attend- 
ing the Yalle Crucis Training School. 
one of our faithful women canned for me 
all the produce she found on the place — 
a most unselfish act, for her days were 
already too full. Another woman makes 
the Communion wine, and a young man 
supplies the Church with wood. The 
Church cleaning is done by a devoted 
soul who is happier in her Father's 
House than anywhere else, and her 
daughter is the Altar Guild. Both the 
women and the GFS have worked hard 
for World Relief and a genuine feeling 
of concern for the suffering: overseas has 



prompted their work and gifts. 

Mr. McKeown comes to this field from 
a year of specialized study of the Rural 
Church. He plans to inaugurate many 
schemes for community betterment. 
Already he has organized the Mission at 
a parish supper meeting where a Mission 
Committee was elected. He has placed 
a registered Guernsey bull calf with one 
of the young men of the Mission, with 
the idea of eventually improving the 
dairy stock of the county. Weaving will 
shortly be started as a new interest and 
source of income for the women and as 
time goes on there will be other com- 
munity projects to report, under Mr. 
McKeown's leadership and God's guid- 
ance. 

— Eloise L. McKinsey. 



The Virginia Branch of the Huguenot 
Society has made a gift to the Presiding 
Bishop's Fund for World Relief, des- 
ignated to buy milk for French tuber- 
cular children. 



It is estimated that thirty-five per cent 
of all household goods has been de- 
stroyed in the Philippines. Most people 
are wearing the only clothing they 
possess. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

THE CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 






r 



» 



!i' 



I 



Father Farnum 

(Continued from Page 2) 
ever lost his journalistic interests, for 
up until the last issue he was the main 
contributor to the editorial page. A 
delegate to three General Conventions, 
member of the Executive Council for 
many years, and worker on countless 
other committees, he has indeed render- 
ed yeoman service to the Diocese in 
which he has worked since 1917. 

But it has been in the most important 
task of all that Father Farnum has been 
distinguished — he has been a parish 
priest. The daily round of worship has 
been his joyful duty; men and women 
have been won to Christ and His 
Church; souls have sought and found 
counsel and absolution; and children 
have been well and truly taught the 
Catholic Faith. 

It is hardly fair to the type of priest- 
hood that Father Farnum represents to 
say that he has "retired'''. "Retirement" 
carries a meaning of ceasing from all 
work. We would rather say that Father 
Farnum will simply live less strenuously 
than he has in the past. 

We rejoice that he will live among us 
for part of each year; we wish him every 
blessing; and we say, "Well done, thou 
good and faithful servant." 



Convocation of Asheville 

Meeting on February 11th at St. 
James' Church, Hendersonville, the 
Convocation of Asheville elected the 
Rev. Westwell Greenwood Dean of the 
Convocation. Father Greenwood, priest 
in charge of St. Luke's, Chunn's Cove 
and Redeemer, Craggy, succeeds Father 
Farnum. 

During the morning session on the 
first day of meeting, the Rev. Howard 
Rhys, vicar of St. James', Black Moun- 
tain, was elected secretary and treasurer. 

During the morning session of the 
first day, the Convocation voted to pro- 
vide two scholarships to the youth camp 
to be held at Patterson School in June. 

A letter of congratulation was sent to 
Archdeacon Kennedy on his receiving 
the Silver Beaver for Boy Scout work. 

Father Rhys read a paper on his work 
as chaplain at Oteen Hospital during the 
afternoon session, and the Rev. I. N. 
Northup was the speaker at the evening 
service. 

A pre-Lenten Quiet Day was held on 
Wednesday, beginning with a celebration 
of the Holy Communion. Father Far- 
num was the conductor. 



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Youth News 

By Ann Shuford 



The Youth Commission of the Diocese 
met in the parish house of Grace Church, 
Morganton, on Thursday, February 
13th. The Rev. Mark Jenkins, chair- 
man of the Commission, presided. Nine 
members were present. 

Plans were made for the Diocesan 
Youth Camp at Patterson School during 
the second week of June. The Rev. 
Boston Lackey, Jr., of Shelby was 
elected director, Mr. Jenkins, vice- 
director, and the Rev. Charles Leavell, 
chaplain. The faculty and counsellors 
will be chosen at a later date. 

* * * 

Another activity for the young people 
is planned for October; a two day youth 
convention will be held in the Diocese 
for the promotion of youth work. 

The Highland Churchman will be 
put on a mailing list with other youth 
groups of the South. In this way, the 
young people will be drawn together by 
knowing of each others activities. 

The Youth Commission went on 
record as unanimously endorsing a 
change in section 7 canon 10 of the Dio- 
cesan Canons concerning the age limit of 
voters in the elections of vestrymen in 
parish elections. The Commission favors 
a change from 21 years to 16 years. 

* * * 

At the Diocesan Convention, a Negro 
will be named to serve on the Youth 
Commission. 



Boys of a boarding school in New 
Jersey decided it was a bit frivolous to 
buy corsages for their dates for the 
junior prom when there are so many 
starving people in the world. So they 
worked out a plan with their dates to 
give the money that would have been 
spent for corsages to the Presiding 
Bishop's Fund for World Relief. 



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JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for GirU owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

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Archdeacon Kennedy receiving the Silver 
Beaver for his work with the Boy Scouts of 
America. 



Archdeacon Kennedy 
Is Honored 

On Monday, February 10, at a meet- 
ing of the Negro Division of the Daniel 
Boone Council of the Boy Scouts of 
America held in Asheville, N. C, the 
Ven. James T. Kennedy received the 
highest award which the Council can 
give: that of the Silver Beaver. This 
award was conferred on Archdeacon 
Kennedy in recognition of his faithful 
years of service in the interest of Boy 
Scouts of the Council, both in connec- 
tion with the local troop and in the 
Negro Division. Mr. William Ensor of 
Cherokee made the presentation on be- 
half of the Council and of the wearers 
of the Silver Beaver. 

Archdeacon Kennedy began his work 
with the Church in 1887 when he went 
to Franklin as cabinet maker and in- 
structor in the mission of St. Cyprian's. 
He was ordained deacon in 1890 and 
advanced to the priesthood in 1915. Al- 
though he has retired and is 81 years of 
age he still does supply work in the Dio- 
cese wherever he is needed. 



10 



Question Box 



At the Holy Communion service I 
hear the priest and people say some- 
thing about "0 Saving Victim" near the 
end. What is this, and why is some- 
thing different from the Prayer Book 
service used? 

This is a hymn, Number 209. The 
words are: 
Saving Victim, opening wide 

The gate of heaven to man below, 
Our foes press on from every side. 

Thine aid supply, Thy strength be- 
stow. 
All praise and thanks to thee ascend 

For evermore, blest One in Three: 
O grant us life that shall not end, 

Tn our true native land with thee. 

Amen. 

This hymn is frequently used instead 
of the Gloria in excelsis, which is on 
page 84 of the Prayer Book. You will 
note the rubric (on page 83) preceding 
the Gloria in excelsis. This rubric states: 
"Then shall be said the Gloria in excelsis, 
all standing, or some proper hymn." 

Is it possible to worship in the Epis- 
copal Church without using the Prayer 
Book? I get quite confused trying to 
follow the service. 

Yes, it is possible to worship without 
the Prayer Book. 

Remember, the Prayer Book is an aid 
to devotion, and is not a substitute. If 
it seems to make your devotions too 
mechanical — if you get so concerned in 
"finding the place" that you lose the 
spirit of worship, put your Prayer Book 
down and spiritually follow the service. 

It is much better to shut your eyes 
and enter the spirit of the service rather 
than lose your temper because you are 
not to familiar with the Prayer Book. 

But check with your Rector. He will 
be glad to help you know the Prayer 
Book and its services better. 





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J. W. Tuton to be 
Rector at Trinity 

The Rev. John W. Tuton, rector of 
St. John's Episcopal church, Mt. Wash- 
ington, Baltimore, Md., has accepted a 
call to be rector of Trinity Church and 
will begin his duties the last Sunday in 
April. 

Announcement of Mr. Tuton's elec- 
tion as rector of the church and his ac- 
ceptance was made to the Trinity con- 
gregation by Julian A. Woodcock, Jr., 
senior warden. 

The new rector succeeds the Rev. 
George Floyd Rogers, who recently an- 
nounced plans to retire from the minis- 
try after serving Trinity 20 years. He 
will continue to conduct services until 
the arrival of Mr. Tuton. 

Mr. Tuton was born in Utica, N. Y., 
October 28, 1914, the son of John Craig 
and Gertrude Wilson Tuton. Upon 
completion of public schools of the city 




he entered Lehign university in 1931, 
graduating with honors in 1935. He 
attended General Theological seminary 
in New York city, graduating in 1938. 
As a part of his seminary training he at- 
tended the Cincinnati School of Social 
Work. 

After his graduation from the semi- 
nary, Mr. Tuton was assistant rector of 
Emmanuel church, Baltimore, from June 
1938, to January 1941, when he became 
rector of St. John's church. 

Mr. Tuton is president of the Clerical 
Discussion group of Baltimore, chairman 
of the music commission of the Diocese 
of Maryland, a member of the board of 
directors of the Church Mission of Help, 
a member of the committee on new 
parishes and congregations and a dele- 
gate to the provincial synod. 

In 1943, Mr. Tuton was married to 
Miss Ernestine Rich of Baltimore. They 
have a daughter, born last year. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 





The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



V0L.-»^y 



APRIL, 1947 



NO. 1 




Christ The King 



Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Adv. Mgr. 

Contributing Editors: The Rev. A. W. 
Farnum, The Rev. C. G. Leavell. 



Easter and World Relief 

The energies and the resources of our 
Church are dedicated to the task of 
raising one million dollars for the Pre- 
siding Bishop's Fund for World Relief. 
Our share is three thousand three hun- 
dred dollars; this can be raised by each 
parish and mission giving a proportion- 
ate share. 

Much encouragement has come by 
the ready response of many parishes, 
misisons, and two of our schools; plans 
are well under way to have Easter offer- 
ings and offerings at other times to be 
given to the Fund. 

Now we call upon the people who 
make up these churches and schools to 
be so fired with Christian love of hum- 
anity that the thousands of hungry, the 
multitude of the homeless and church- 
less throughout the world will not 
stretch out their hands to us in vain. 

Let us make the Easter message of 
the victory of life over death a living 
| reality by our unstinted generosity. 



IN MEMORIAM 

The Church has lost a faithful 
parish priest with the death of the 
Rev. Samuel Bradley Stroup. For 
over thirty years rector of the Church 
of the Ascension, Hickory, he will be 
sorely missed in his parish and in the 
diocese. 

On the human level, men are honor- 
ed for the activity and zeal they show 
in their relations with their fellow- 
men, but the honor that comes to men 
for courage in suffering and the quiet 
life of prayer comes only from God. 
The times without number that Mr. 
Stroup has gone to the altar to cele- 
brate the holy mysteries when other 
men would have groaned in pain is 
only an instance of this priest's devo- 
tion to his Blessed Lord. 

"May the soul of the faithful de- 
parted rest in peace; and light per- 
petual shine upon him." 



Church Congress 

Arrangements have been made with 
the Rev. Capers Satterlee for the Reg- 
ional Church Congress to meet at the 
Church of the Advent, Spartanburg, 
S. C, April 29th, with supper meeting 
at 6:30 P. M. An interesting program 
is being arranged on the topic "Auth- 
ority and Freedom in Doctrine" which 
should draw both laymen and priests 
from Western North Carolina, L T pper 
South Carolina, North Carolina, and 
South Carolina. The program is being 
arranged so that most persons may leave 
bv 9:30 P. M. at the latest, and return 
home for the night. 



The Christus Rex on our cover is a 
photograph of the altar cross to be 
placed in the Sanctuary of Trinity 
Chapel, Haw Creek, N. C. It was 
designed and executed by Charles 
Latimer Gri°:sbv of Asheville. 



Are We Able? 



Editorial writers are often given to 
"viewing with alarm" and the High- 
land Churchman is no exception to 
the rule. We are concerned over the 
failure of the Diocese to show an in- 
crease in the number of those who are 
Episcopalians. At a time when many 
dioceses are showing large increases and 
when denominational bodies within our 
own borders are reporting a steady ad- 
vance in membership. Western North 
Carolina has had the doubtful distinc- 
tion of being one of two dioceses that 
was reported to have decreased in com- 
municant strength in 1945. 

It is possible to advance plausible 
reasons for the 2% decrease within our 
ranks. One reason advanced is the at- 
tempt by some parishes and missions 
to present a more accurate report of 
their numerical strength by dropping 
many names from their rolls. We hear- 
tily agree with the idea that totally in- 
active members and those who have 
moved with no attempt to transfer their 
membership should not be reported. A 
concern over having to report fewer 
members should not allow us to condone 
"padded" communicant lists. 

Reasons, however, plausible, do not 
enable us to meet the problems caused 
by numerical weakness or what is worse, 
weakening of our numbers. In our 
parishes and missions the undertaking 
of new building, much needed repairs, 
support of the clergy is not being done 
enough. We are not showing forth to 
many communities that the Episcopal 
Church is a vital Church. All too often 
we are met with a blank look of surprise 
when we ask the whereabouts of the 
Church in a town where it has been 
established for many years. 

In our diocesan life the problems 
caused by our numerical weakness are 
even more glaring. Every year at Con- 
vention the Treasurer has to report that 
we have just been able to meet our 



obligations, that there was the utmost 
difficulty in scraping enough money to- 
gether to pay mission salaries, and that 
there was no balance large enough to 
permit a real advance in efforts to ex- 
pand our influence. When the Finance 
Department presents the budget, one 
can be almost certain that the same 
figures that were in the last year's bud- 
get will be repeated. If there should 
be boldness in asking for an appreciable 
increase on any given item in the bud- 
get, that boldness is met with the logic 
that few members mean few dollars and 
few dollars dictates our staying in the 
same old track. 

Our failure to be opening new church- 
es, our failure to be able to procure and 
support more priests and lay-workers, 
and our failure to make the Church a 
power for good in the area God has 
alloted to us all have their roots in the 
failure to expand our membership. But 
these failures are as nothing when com- 
pared with the grave spiritual danger 
we are in if a trend towards weakness 
is allowed to continue. Men and women 
in need of the comforting Gospel look 
at our weakening Church and are not 
drawn to it. For those within the 
Church the sense of weakness leads to 
the deadening or loss of interest and the 
falling away of the weak. Our Bishop 
has always been aware of the spiritual 
danger due to numerical weakness, and 
time after time has called upon his 
priests and laity to win more men and 
women to the Church. 

The answer to the problems caused 
by a decreasing Church population lies 
in this: priests and people must do more 
than they have in the past to bring souls 
to Christ through His Church. There 
must be such a revival of evangelical 
zeal that we will abandon the policy of 
hoping that the Episcopal birth-rate and 
our social respectability will make us 
grow. 




Father Webbe has written a number 
of short stories which have been pub- 
lished under the pen name of Stephen 
Cole in the Saturday Evening Post and 
in Redbook magazine. 



Webbe Accepts Call As 
Rector of St. Mary's 

The Rev. Gale D. Webbe, chaplain 
at Christ School, Arden, has accepted a 
call to St. Mary's Episcopal church, 
where he will succeed the Rev. Arthur 
W. Farnum as rector. 

Father Farnum will retire May 1, and 
Father Webbe will come to the parish 
June 10, at the end of the school year. 

Father Webbe, who is an instructor 
and assistant coach at the school, has 
been at Christ School for six years. He 
graduated at Amherst College in 1930, 
where he was a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa scholastic fraternity and captain 
of his swimming team. Following grad- 
uation he attended General Theological 
Seminary in New York, graduating in 
1935, and was ordained to the Episcopal 
priesthood. 

For the next two years he was in Kan- 
sis engaged in mission work, following 
this with work in St. Andrews parish in 
New Jersey for four years. At present 
he lives on the campus of the school 
with his wife and two children, Carroll, 
nine, and David, six. 



The Rev. John C. Seagle 
Dies 

The Rev. John C. Seagle, retired 
priest, died Sunday, March 23 at his 
home in Hendersonville following a 
short illness. 

A native of Rutherfordton, he was 
the son of the late Phillip C. and Mary 
Drake Seagle. He attended the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and -General 
Theological Seminary. 

Before his ordination, Mr. Seagle was 
sent by Bishop Cheshire to teach school 
at Beaver Creek, in Ashe County. He 
and Airs. Lou Taylor, now of Valle 
Crucis, were present at the famous con- 
firmation where Bishop Cheshire was 
forced to hold confirmation out of doors. 
The use of the school building had been 
forcibly refused because feeling was 
then running high in the neighborhood 
against the Church. 

Mr. Seagle's first parish was St. Paul's 
Church, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., where he 
served from 1910 to 1917. From 1917 
to 1925 he was rector of St. Phillip's 
Church, Brevard, and from 1925 to 1931 
he was rector of St. Paul's and St. Pet- 
er's Church at Salisbury. His last par- 
ish was St. John's, Charleston, S. C, 
where he served from 1931 until his 
retirement in 1940. 

He is survived by a daughter, Miss 
Mary Kent Seagle; two sisters, Mrs. 
N. E. Smith and Mrs. C. R. Cody, both 
of Hendersonville; and two brothers, 
the Rev. Nathan A. Seagle and P. E. 
Seagle. 

Funeral services were held in St. 
James Church, Hendersonville, on Tues- 
day, March 25, at 11 o'clock, with the 
Rev. 1. P. Burke officiating. 



1ISIS 




The Rev. S. B. Stroup Dies 

The Rev. Samuel Bradley Stroup, 
rector of the Church of the Ascension, 
Hickory, died on March 26 following a 
long illness. Mr. Stroup's death brought 
to a close the longest pastorate in the 
diocese, a tenure of over 33 years. 

A native of Fletcher, he spent his boy- 
hood at Arden where he helped to build 
Christ School. He was graduated from 
the University of North Carolina with 
the class of 1910, and from the General 
Theological Seminary in 1913. Upon his 
ordination to the diaconate in 1913, he 
came to Hickory where he was advanced 
to the priesthood. 

Until illness prevented his active par- 
ticipation, Mr. Stroup held many im- 
portant positions in the diocese. He had 
been a deputy of General Convention, 



a member of the Standing Committee 
which he served as Secretary for many 
years, a member of the Executive Coun- 
cil, and up to the time of his death he 
was the chairman of the board of exam- 
ining chaplains. 

In addition to his work as a parish 
priest, he was active in community affairs 
in Hickory. He was a charter member 
of the Hickory Rotary club. 

He leaves his widow, one daughter, 
Mrs. Hugh LaFone of Hickory; two 
sons, S. B. Stroup, Jr., of Kannapolis 
and the Rev. Dudley J. Stroup, rector 
of Epiphany Church, Renssalaer, N. Y. 

Funeral services were conducted on 
Friday, March 28, at Hickory, with 
Bishop Gribbin officiating. The clergy 
of the diocese attended, serving as hon- 
orary pallbearers. 



Trinity Church Plans 
Rectory 

A campaign is currently in progress 
to raise $18,100 for the purchase of a 
rectory for Trinity Episcopal church, it 
was announced yesterday by Edwin S. 
Hartshorn, general chairman of the 
drive. 

Negotiations have been completed for 
purchase of a house at 76 Gertrude 
Place, Mr. Hartshorn explained. The 
fund will be obtained from members of 
Trinity parish. 

The present rectory adjoining the 
church is unsuitable for tenancy having 
been unused for many years. The Rev. 
John W. Tuton, new rector of the 
church, succeeding the Rev. George 
Floyd Rogers, who retired recently, will 
arrive in April. 

Checks for the fund may be sent to 
V. Jordan Brown, parish treasurer, at 
Trinitv church on Church street. 



Youth News 

By Ann Shu ford 



Asheville 

The youth club of Trinity, Asheville, 
has adopted a 16 month old baby in 
Europe. Ten dollars was collected and 
sent to headquarters where a box will 
be packed, fully equipped with the 
necessary items for the baby. 

Because the club did not have a con- 



Young Peoples' Camp 
June 8-14 

The Diocesan Young Peoples' 
Camp will be held at Patterson School 
beginning with supper on Sunday, 
June 8th and ending after breakfast 
on Saturday, June 14th. 

Registrations will be limited to 
Episcopalians until May 15th, so the 
application printed in this issue should 
be sent in at once to the Rev. Boston 
M. Lackey, Jr., Box 997, Shelby, 
N. C. 

The age limit will be 13 to 24. Full- 
er information will be found in the 
May Youth Issue of The Highland 
Churchman. 



stitution, a aommittee was set up to 
write a new one. After several meet- 
ings the constitution was finished and 
unanimously accepted by the group. 

* * * 

Gastonia 

Since the reorganization of the youth 
group of St. Mark's, Gastonia, much 
progress has been made. One of their 
goals is to raise funds for a credence 
table for the planned new church. To- 
wards raising funds for this purpose the 
club sponsored an auction, selling sand- 
wiches and drinks. The cakes, cookies, 
candy, and other tempting items auc- 
tioned off were given to the young peo- 
ple by the Auxiliary. Girls from the 
local Youth Center entertained the 
guests with songs and piano selections. 
A very beautiful selection of Ave Maria 
was played as a violin selection. The 
club made a profit of $52. 

* * * 

Province of Sewanee 

Helen Thomas, president of the 
Diocesan Young People's organization 
and representative on the Provincial 
Youth Commission, attended a meeting 
of this Commission in Atlanta, Feb- 
ruary 28 to March 2. This meeting was 
held to plan the summer camp at Kanu- 
ga, July 22 to August 2. Helen was 
made secretary of the Provincial Com- 



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Overseas Relief 

On March 16th, at the First Presby- 
terian Church, Asheville, an interde- 
nominational youth meeting was held 
for the purpose of stressing Overseas 
Relief. Members of Calvary, Fletcher, 
and St. James, Hendersonville, attended 
this meeting. Dr. Grady Harding, 
Methodist minister at Black Mountain, 
was the speaker of the afternoon. A 
movie, "Seeds of Destiny", was shown, 
portraying the life in Europe as it is 
today. It is hoped that all young people 
of North Carolina will support this pro- 
gram for Overseas Relief. 



Fletcher 

A new Church School class has been 
organized for the members of the Young 
Churchmen's Club at Calvary, Fletcher. 
Mr. H. Small Miller, a new member of 
the Vestry, is the teacher. For the 
course of study, "Our Christian Charac- 
ter" was chosen. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — -Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 



BELK'S 

Reviember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



STUDIOS OF 
GGORGG L.PAYDG 

245-BROXDWSY-PATeRSOn D..J. 
K FOUaDeD.ld.96 St 

CHURCH ffiGfllORIALS 

STAIDGD GLASS-WOOD'ffiCTAL 

ALL CHURCH CRAFTS 



Reminders 

Plan now for the Nationwide Corpor- 
ate Communion for all the youth of the 
Church on April 27th, three weeks after 
Easter. 

Keep your offerings going into your 
mite boxes and let's surpass last year's 
total. The Convocational Services for 
the Presentation of the Lenten Offering, 
are scheduled as follows: 

Convocation of Asheville, at Calvary 
Church, Fletcher, Sunday, April 20, 
3 p. m. 

Convocation of Morganton, at Grace 
Church, Morganton, Saturday, April 19, 
11 a. m. 

Watch the Youth News column for 
further news about Patterson Camp, 
and fill out and mail now the application 
blank to be found in this issue of the 
Highland Churchman. 



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Question Box 



i 



By The Rev. J. P. Burke 

0. What is the procedure for change 
ing Diocesan Canons? 

Any proposition to alter or add to the 
Canons of the Diocese should be sub- 
mitted, in writing, to the Chairman of 
the Committee on Canons. He, in turn, 
submits the proposition to the members 
of the Committee for consideration. 
After the proposition is duly considered 
by the Committee it may be reported 
to the Convention of the Diocese. If 
it is reported on the First Day of the 
Convention, it may be discussed and 
passed the Second Day of the Conven- 
tion. A change in the Constitution, 
however, requires two Conventions. 

0. I think one should be a commu- 
nicant in order to be eligible for a ves- 
tryman. What do you think? 

Some Dioceses do make this require- 
ment, but in a small Diocese, composed 
chiefly of small parishes, it is probably 
best to leave the law as we have it, 
namely, requiring that a person be bap- 
tized to be available for vestryman and 
a communicant to be available for war- 
den. It does seem, however, that, when 
we permit a baptized man to serve on 
the vestry, we should also permit him 
to serve as a delegate to his Diocesan 
Convention (man or women). At pres- 
ent, we do not. (Canon 2). 

0. What is "an adherent of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church?" 

I do not know precisely what an ad- 
herent means in this connection. Since 
an adherent means a follower or a sup- 
porter, it may or may not mean that 
one has to be baptized or confirmed to 
be "an adherent'". It is used in section 
7 of Canon 10. This same section, how- 
ever, ends with these words: " nor 

shall any person vote in a Parish who is 
not a bona fide member of the same". I 
think section seven is adequate without 
the expression. If a person is not a 
bona fide member, according to the 
Canon he cannot vote. If he is a bona 
fide member, then surely, he should be, 
at least, an adherent. 



Woman's Auxiliary News 

By Elizabeth Van Noppen 

The Executive Board of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina met in Marion on Tues- 
day, March 18th, with thirteen mem- 
bers, the Bishop, and two visitors pres- 
ent. Many items of business were dis- 
cussed fully, chief among them being 
the Woman's Auxiliary Conference. The 
Board unanimously decided to hold the 
first of these conferences this summer 
during August, either at Patterson 
School or at Valle Crucis. The exact 
date and place will be announced later, 
but be making plans now to attend. 

The Board members were entertained 
at lunch by Mrs. Sam Yancey, who is 
a member of St. John's parish, in Ma- 
rion, and Director of the Third District. 

Dates for the Spring District meet- 
ings were set as follows: 

First District will meet on April 29th 
at Waynesville. 

Second District will meet on April 
30th at Edneyville. 

Third District will meet on April 22nd 
at Patterson School. 

Fourth District will meet on April 
23rd at Lincolnton. 

Fifth District will meet on April 20th 
at Rutherfordton. 

Kanuga is a spot consecrated to one 
purpose — that of religious education in 
its broadest sense. It is at Kanuga that 
adults — and boys and girls — learn of 
religion through worship, study, and 
fellowship. This year, as in years past, 
many outstanding men and women will 
be there to lecture and lead discussions, 
so mark the following dates on your cal- 
endar, and begin making plans toward 
them: 

Annual Meeting on June 5th and 6th. 

Retreat on July 9th-12th. 

Adult Conference on July 12th-16th. 

All Auxiliary members, whether elect- 
ed as delegates or not, are urged to at- 
tend the Annual Meeting. Miss Fletcher 
is planning an excellent program for the 
three sessions — the afternoon of the 5th, 
and the morning of the 6th. 





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Early Days of Calvary 
Church, Fletcher 

By The Rev. J. B. Sill 

Pictured here is the original Calvary Church, 
Fletcher. Restored after a fire in 1935, it is one 
of the most beautiful churches in the diocese. 



It was some twenty years after the Church of St. John in the Wilderness at 
Flat Rock had been built, that members of the Episcopal Church who belonged 
to that congregation and had homes in the neighborhood of what is now Fletcher, 
decided to build a Church near where they lived. They were people of some 
wealth, some of them merchants and rice planters, from S. C. and were among 
the pioneer summer residents of the mou-ntain country. The building of the 
Buncombe-Turnpike Road in 1828 fr6m- Greenville, S. C, thru Saluda Gap to 
Asheville, opened up a better means of travel from the low country. It was in 
1857 that Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Blake gathered a few others together one evening 
at their home "The Meadows", to form plans for building a Church, which was 
consecrated August 21, 1859, by Bishop Atkinson. With the uncertain condition 
of the Nation, and the approaching conflict of the Civil War, these founders of 
Calvary are to be honored for their Christian zeal and faith. Of them we find 
the names of Blake, Robertson, Pyatt, Heyward and Molyneaux, to which should 
be added that of Dr. G. W. Fletcher, a native resident, who became the first Junior 
Warden of the vestry. The Church was named after Calvary Church of New York 
City. The location of the Church was well chosen, having a woodland setting, and 
built far enough back from the highway to provide an extensive lawn. The Pisgah 
Range could be seen to the west and the hills of Hooper Creek to the east. The 
Church became definitely a Church of a wide country-side. It was a brick struc- 
ture, and, sad to relate, was burned down in 1935, except its picturesque tower, 
which was built as a memorial, including the Church bell, to rector Morris to whom 
we shall refer. The present building, which includes the old tower, is a replica of 
the old Church, tho somewhat larger and with a side Chapel, choir and sacristy 
rooms added. The Chapel, soon to be furnished, is to be a memorial to the 
founders and early benefactors of the parish. The beginnings of the adjoining 
cemetery were in the early days of the Church. . 

In a few years a rectory was built, a frame structure to the rear of the Church, 
as also a school room, Miss Fanny Blake having added 15 acres to the original 
four acres of the Church property. Miss Fanny was a benefactress of the Church, 
taught a day school for many years in the school room, and was in other ways an 
active Church worker. During its early years the parish depended chiefly on 
Rev. N. Collins Hughes, of Hendersonville, and on ministers from the Ravenscroft 
Associate Missions of Asheville for officiating at services, and also on two who 
were resident pastors for short periods. Rev. Geo. M. Everhardt and Rev. Thomas 
A. Morris, the latter the first resident rector. 

The period from 1878 to 1900 was one of considerable growth in the parish, 

10 



during the rectorships of Rev. E. A. Osborne, Rev. W. S. Bynum and Rev. H. H. 
Phelps. Communicant numbers kept increasing, and at the close of Mr. Osborne's 
pastorate in 1885 there were 150 reported in the Sunday School. He founded 
several Mission stations, Churches being built, one in Pinners Cove called Mt. 
Calvary, and the first St. Paul's at Edneyville. During his rectorship the Chancel 
window, representing Christ on the Cross, was put in, appropriate to the Church's 
name. During Mr. Bynum's pastorate the present stone rectory on land across 
the highway from the Church, was built. An estimate of his pastorate has been 
given by a later rector: — -"His administration was a peculiarly Churchly one. The 
Church was kept open constantly, the teachings of the Book of Common Prayer 
closely followed and the Holy Communion celebrated every Lord's Day and 
Saint's Day. The Parish School was excellently maintained and six other schools 
drew their support from the constituency of Calvary Parish." Some of these 
schools, evidently Sunday Schools, were of the Missions started by Mr. Osborne. 
Besides the two already mentioned we find ones reported at Rock Hall, Reids, 
Mt. Zion, Fairview and Seagles, and during Mr. Phelps' pastorate, in 1898, we 
find additional Missions at Arden, Valley Springs, 'Possum Trot and Boiling 
Springs. What Missionaries those ministers were! During the days of which we 
are writing Bishops Atkinson, Lyman and Cheshire, of the N. C. diocese, to which 
the western part of the state belonged until 1896, made regular visitations to 
Calvary Church for confirmations. 

Names of native residents who belonged to Calvary in its early days are still 
found among present members of the congregation, as Pressley, Lance, Frady, 
Lambert, Baldwin, Stroup and Shuford. The last name recalls to us the name of 
Shufordville, as that by which the neighborhood was known for many years after 
the Church was founded. We should add the names of Westfeldt, Beale and 
Weston, as those of "foreigners", to use an accepted term, who in time settled in 
the parish and added strength to its early membership. 

There was no Fletcher town in those days, which in time grew up about the 
home of Dr. Fletcher, mentioned above, whose home also gave hospitality, after 
the fashion of an Inn, to many a traveler on the turnpike. The picturesque home, 
with its large boxwoods in the front yard, is alas there no longer. It was my 
privilege to know Dr. Fletcher's widow, whose love for her home and its guests 
marked her as one of God's saints. 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL — JUNE 8-14, 1947 

Name , Age 

Address 

Parish or Mission 

Signature of Parent or Guardian 

I certify that the applicant is a member of the Episcopal Church, and that I 
recommend him/her to the Diocesan Camp. 

(Rector or Priest) 
Cut out this application, and mail to the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., 125 N. 
Morgan St., Shelby, N. C, together with $1.00 registration fee. 

11 



EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT: 

HOW GIFTS ARE DISTRIBUTED 
OVERSEAS 

The heart-warming experience of see- 
ing America's church-sent supplies han- 
dled and distributed was related upon 
his return from a tour of Europe re- 
cently by Rev. Herbert C. Lytle, Jr., 
assistant director of the Service division 
of Church World Service. 

He concentrated his attention in Ger- 
many where the native Evangelical 
Hilfswerk distributes goods sent bv 

cws. 

"The work", he said, "starts in Bre- 
men. There on the docks and in a ware- 
house were the bales, the boxes, the 
packages from America. The material 
was in excellent condition." 

He observed how the Hilfswerk peo- 
ple divided the material, then sent it 
to the various districts in the occupied 



zones, where it was sorted according to 
size and type. Winter clothing received 
first priority. 

The final phase of this "international 
Christian operation" was in the parishes 
themselves. Mr. Lytle watched the way 
supplies were handled at a church in 
Frankfurt. 

"Ninety people a day were inter- 
viewed and given aid"', he said. One 
social worker first investigated each re- 
quest to confirm the need. "Creed was 
no factor. But the need had to be con- 
firmed'". 

"After that the person or family was 
given whatever supplies the parish could 
alot from the stockpile. 

"This truly magnifiicent Christian 
undertaking is a bright sign of hope 
on a continent dark with sickness, rest- 
lessness and want," Mr. Lvtle said. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 





The Official Publication ot the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVIII 



MAY, 1947 



YOUTH ISSUE 




NO. 2 



A View of the Campus of Patterson School, -where the Young People's 
Camp is held every year. 



$l?f f tgipUnb 
dljurrijman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road. Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Adv. Mgr. 



Youth Camp 

Churchmen of all ages should rejoice 
in the fact that there has been the lead- 
ership and vision to start and continue 
an annual camp conference for the 
young people of the Diocese. No other 
single thing has done so much to give 
a sense of Christian unity to the future 
senior wardens, vestrymen and Auxiliary 
presidents who come to Patterson for a 
week of worship, study and recreation. 
There are few parishes that have young 
people go to camp that do not notice an 
increase in the enthusiasm and loyalty 
to the Church. 

When the youth camp was first start- 
ed, there were some fears that such a 
program would interfere or hamper the 
larger program of Kanuga. Experience 
has shown that this is not so; rather the 
diocesan youth conference has been a 
valuable auxiliary to Kanuga's program 
in that the experiences of young people 
in a provincial program are crystallized 
into diocesan action by having the young 
people brought together in a smaller, 



more homogeneous group within the 
diocese. 

We in the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina should do all in our power to 
encourage our young people, bringing 
them more and more into the stream of 
our Church life as they grow in wisdom 
and stature. The camp at Patterson 
will help do this; we must do our part 
by supporting the young people. 



Diocesan Convention 

It has been a quarter of a century 
since the Missionary District of Ashe- 
ville became the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina and assembled for its 
first annual convention. A silver anni- 
versary for a diocese is always a happy 
event; the years have been enough to 
look back upon with satisfaction for 
much that has been accomplished and 
yet not so long that there are not a 
goodly number of those who were pres- 
ent at that first convention. We who 
have come after cannot fully realize 
what struggle and work was necessary 
to make an annual convention a possi- 
bility. 

Like the first convention, this twenty- 
fifth finds the Church in Western North 
Carolina just emerging from a terrible 
war in which she had a share with the 
rest of the world. Every report that 
comes before the convention, every 
resolution that is passed and every other 
action taken by the convention should 
be viewed in the light of making some 
contribution towards the re-adjustment 
of a world so lately torn by strife. It is 
not too much to say that the acts of our 
particular part of the Episcopal Church 
will be scrutinized by both critical and 
uncritical observers in an attempt to 
learn what part of the Christian Church 
is willing to do in times like these. If 
the convention is approached in this 
way, it becomes more than just a busi- 
ness meeting of a highly organized 
church; convention can be our way of 
so speaking and acting that we will in- 
fluence all around us for good. 



Come To Camp Patterson 

By the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., 
Director 

Camp time for the Young People of 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
is just around the corner. Come June, 
and you'll be coming to Camp Patter- 
son. 

Patterson School, Legenvood, X. C, 
is the place, and the dates are June 8th 
to the 14th. All of you who have been 
to Camp and all who will come this year 
for the first time will love Patterson 
School. It is right in the middle of 
Happy Valley with plenty of room to 
roam around, places to swim, ball diam- 
onds and tennis courts and basketball 
courts to use. All this, with dancing, 
campfires, entertainments, work, and 
worship, gives you an idea of what will 
go on. This Camp has everything you 
can think of and more, to give you the 
busiest, happiest, best week of the whole 
year. If you are an Episcopalian be- 
tween the ages of 13 and 23, living in 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
you are eligible to register for the 
Camp. The cost of the Camp is one 
item that has not gone up! It will be 
the same as it was last year, $6.00 plus 



one dollar registration fee, $7.00 in all. 
If you want to come, fill out the regis- 
tration blank found at bottom of this 
page and mail it along with your one 
dollar registration fee to the Director, 
the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., Box 
997, Shelby, N. C. When he gets this 
he will send you all the other informa- 
tion you have to have before Camp 
starts. Don't wait! Send it in now! 
Unfortunately the number we can ac- 
commodate is limited so applications 
will be accepted on a basis of priority. 
First come, first served. After May 
15th applications from non-Episcopa- 
lians will be accepted on the same basis. 

We are looking forward to a good 
camp this year. Good fun, good food, 
good instruction, good worship. You 
can't afford to miss it. 

This will be the first time for me at 
the Diocesan Camp, and I'm looking 
forward to it as about the best thing 
I've ever been privileged to attend, and 
it ought to be just that for everybody. 
All of us who are the young people of 
this Diocese have a big job: to make 
the Episcopal Church grow and be 
strong wherever we live. If we are 
going to do this job we need help and 
inspiration. These are the two things 



REGISTRATION BLANK FOR DIOCESAN YOUTH CAMP 
PATTERSON SCHOOL — JUNE 8-14, 1947 

Name Age 

Address 

Parish or Mission 

Signature of Parent or Guardian 

I certify that the applicant is a member of the Episcopal Church, and that I 
recommend him/her to the Diocesan Camp. 



(Rector or Priest) 

Cut out this application, and mail to the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Jr., 125 N. 
Morgan St., Shelby, N. C, together with $1.00 registration fee. 

3 



Camp Patterson will try to give this 
year, and we can have a lot of fun get- 
ting them. We hear a lot about how 
we ought to live together as Christians. 
At Camp Patterson we have an oppor- 
tunity to try it out. You might call it 
a "lab experiment" in Christian living 
— the only worthwhile kind of living 
there is — the kind of living we want to 
try to reproduce at home. We've got a 
job to do; we've got places to go; let's 
get started! 

See you at Camp ! 



W. H. Stewart Dies 

Mr. W. H. Stewart died on April 28th 
at his home in Asheville after an illness 
of six weeks following a heart attack. 

A native of Chestertown, Md., Mr. 
Stewart came to Asheville from Mt. Ver- 
non, N. Y., in 1938 after having been a 
summer resident for many years. Pre- 
vious to his retirement, he had been an 
executive of the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Company. 

Mr. Stewart had been very active in 
the Church, serving as senior warden of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, which posi- 
tion he held at the time of his death, 
and had been the advertising manager 
of the Highland Churchman as well 
as having served as a member of the 
Department of Promotion and a dele- 
gate to the Provincial Synod. 

One of the most outstanding pieces 
of work accomplished by Mr. Stewart 
was his contribution to the success of 
the Reconstruction and Advance Fund 
campaign within the Diocese last year. 
Mr. Stewart was chairman of the com- 
mittee appointed to raise the money for 
this fund. Those who were present at 
the Diocesan Convention in 1945 will 
not forget the moving appeal Mr. Stew- 
art made for the success of this cam- 
paign. 

Funeral services were conducted in 
Calvary Church at 4 o'clock on April 
30th with the Rev. Mark Jenkins, rec- 
tor, officiating. 




Rev. B. M. Lackey, Jr. This picture 
was taken before his ordination. He is 
the Director of the 1947 Youth Camp. 

Cravner Elected To 
Rectorship 

The Rev. William C. Cravner, who 
for the past few months has been act- 
ing rector of St. Mark's Church, Gas- 
tonia, has been elected rector of that 
parish. 

Mr. Cravner came to Gastonia from 
York, S. C, where he has been rector 
of the Church of the Good Shepherd 
since 1941. Before that time he had 
been rector of All Soul's, Biltmore. 

Because of his previous connection 
with the diocese, Mr. Cravner is widely 
known, and St. Mark's and the diocese 
is fortunate in having him again canoni- 
cally connected with the church in this 
diocese. 



LAMBERT DEAN OF MORGANTON 

The Rev. Peter W. Lambert, Jr., rec- 
tor of x\ppalachian School, Penland, was 
elected Dean of the Convocation of 
Morganton on April 19th. He succeeds 
the Rev. B. M. Lackey, of Lenoir, who 
has been Dean for many years. 



Why Have A Diocesan Camp? 



Bx the Rev. Charles G. Leave!!, 
Chaplain for 1947 

A summer camp such as we have at 
Patterson School for the young people 
of this Diocese is a lot of fun, but is that 
the real reason for having it? Well, it 
is one reason, and the best one if you 
know what real fun is. But what is it: 

Most of all it is knowing God, and 
learning to share that knowledge of Him 
with others. That is the chief reason 
for a Diocesan Camp; it is what is back 
of the Youth Camp at Patterson School. 
The Youth Commission of the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina had this in 
mind when they started the camp four 
years ago. They were anxious for the 
young people in this section to know 
the greatest joy of life, the only joy that 
lasts. They wanted those who came to 
camp, first of all, to find God, and then 
to take this knowledge and communion 
and experience of God back to their 
own local parishes and missions. The 
prayers and worship, the talks by the 
Camp Chaplain and others, the study 
in the classes, have all had this primary 
object uppermost. We plan to have it 
so again this summer. 

What connection does this primary 
motive have with swimming, softball, 
tennis, hiking, campfires, singing, stunts, 
jokes, and dancing? Much more than 
might appear on the surface; much 
more, we fear, than some who attend 
camp come to realize. The Church be- 
lieves in the sort of God Who placed us 
upon this earth with the idea that we 
should enjoy it, enjoy each other, and 
enjoy Himself. The fact that some miss 
the point and abuse the privilege of 
camping does not argue this belief away. 
The recreational activities of the Dioces- 
an Camp which occupies a great part 
of our time can actually teach Theology, 
the logic of what God is like and what 
He plans for us to do in this world. Our 
recreation is meant to tell each young 
person that the Church believes in a 
God Whose greatest pleasure is to give 



us life to the full, and Who Himself 
provides occasions for our enjoyment 
and pleasure. There are too many 
people in our world who believe in a 
God and a religion of gloom, who frown 
upon certain of the amusements of our 
camp. The program of our Diocesan 
Camp is a protest against such a belief, 
an attempt to point the youth of the 
Church to the true God as revealed in 
Jesus Christ Who Himself lived life to 
the full. He attended the merry wed- 
ding feast at Cana, He hiked the roads 
of Palestine, He thoroughly enjoyed 
the mountains, He camped and cooked 
on a fire beside the Galilean Lake. His 
Cross itself is not the final word; it 
loses its true meaning apart from the 
joys and glory and life of Easter. 

A secondary motive for our Diocesan 
Camp is to create a Diocesan conscious- 
ness and fellowship among the young 
people of Western North Carolina. This 
is important, and a motive we shall not 
forget. Yet primarily the reason for our 
Camp at Patterson School is not to know 
one another, but to know God in His 
bigness, His glory, and His love. 



VOTING AGE FAVORING YOUTH 
PASSED AT CONVENTION 

An amendment to Canon 10, Section 
7, was passed at the second day of the 
Diocesan Convention which allows 
members of a parish who are 18 years 
old to vote in elections for vestrymen. 
The Youth Commission had worked for 
some time on a plan whereby the voting 
age could be lowered in order to allow 
more participation in parish life by the 
young people of the diocese. 

The amendment to the canon did not 
pass without much spirited discussion on 
the subject. The first proposal to have 
the age limit set at 16 years did not find 
favor with the Convention, so the com- 
promise age of 18 proved to be the 
solution. 



YOUTH AND AGE 



By the Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Chairman of Youth Commission 

"And they both ran together", but the 
younger did outrun the older man and 
arrived at the empty tomb first, but he 
did not go in; instead he waited for age 
to enter first. So it is in the Church 
everywhere. Youth with its visions and 
enthusiasm runs side by side with age, 
with its experience and conservatism, 
in building a strong, virile and useful 
"household of God on the tops of these 
mountains". 

There are those who wish youth 
would be seen and not heard. These 
will say these inexperienced, fickle young 
people should raise funds when ordered 
to do so, they should do much of the 
menial work around the sacristy or at a 
Parish supper, they should be found in 
the Sunday school to absorb wisdom 
from their elders, they must be ready 
to take over the responsible positions in 
the Parish at some future time. The 
thinkers of such thoughts are those un- 
willing to "run with youth". 

But in fairness we must say there are 
youths who think that anyone past 
thirty years of age is ancient, with no 
vision or enthusiasm to strike out on 
new paths, or even to run at all, with 
no interest in young people except to 
get to of them as much work as possible. 
These young people think that things 
are not better in the Church because 
youth cannot take over the reins and 
throw out all the "old-timers". These 
are the youths unwilling to "run togeth- 
er" with age. 

Happy is the community, the congre- 
gation, or the family, where all will and 
do run together! Age must be willing 
to rise out of lethargy and run with 
youth, and must give of its experience 
and wisdom in directing and guiding 
those of lesser years into paths tried 
and true. Then youth must respond 
by a willingness to learn, a readiness 



to do what is asked, quick to cooperate 
and accept what age has to give, but 
never once losing the enthusiasm which 
is concomitant with youth. 

In this Diocese of Western North 
Carolina we have an official body to 
guide and plan youth activities. We 
call it "The Youth Commission". Some 
of its members are more mature in years 
and experience than others. It meets 
several times each year to discuss and 
plan. The voices of age and experience 
"run together" with the voices of youth 
and enthusiasm, and from this happy 
association come such things as a Dio- 
cesan Youth Camp, and a projected All- 
Youth Convention in the fall. 



A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT OF 

THE YOUNG CHURCHMEN OF 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

Dear Young Churchmen: 

Here it is spring again, and time to 
start thinking about Patterson Camp 
and the good times we have always had 
there. 

It takes many weeks of hard work by 
camp officials to plan a camp week for 
us ! Those of you who have attended 
camp since that first year can certainly 
see the many improvements that have 
been made in the daily program. Every 
minute is taken up with some activity, 
and we know this year will be even 
better than the previous ones. So, come 
to Patterson again this year, and let 
those who have worked so hard to make 
your stay an unforgettable one know 
how much you like it and how much it 
means to you. 

Knowing all of you has been a very 
happy experience for me, and I am look- 
ing forward to June, when we can all 
get together for a glorious week in Hap- 
py Valley. 

Sincerely, 

Helen Thomas 



YOUNG CHURCHMEN NEWS 



By Ann Shuford 

Fletcher 

The Young Churchmen's Club of Cal- 
vary Church, Fletcher, acted as host to 
all the children of the Sunday Schools 
and Junior Choirs of the Parishes and 
Missions of the Convocation of Ashe- 
ville for the presentation service of the 
Lenten Offering. About 350 attended 
this service. The Rev. H. Boyd Ed- 
wards preached the sermon. A picnic 
supper and soft drinks were enjoyed on 
the lawn after the service. 

The Hon Joseph T. Kloman, brother 
to Mrs. Mark Jenkins, now with the 
State Department in Washington, spoke 
to the Y. C. C. about his work in the 
0. S. S. in Europe during this last war. 
This is one of the most interesting talks 
ever heard by this group, for he told 
much about the underground work, 
secret atomic experiments 
forces disrupted by the 



sabotage and 
of the Axis 

0. s. s. 



Morganton 

The Young People's Service League 
of Grace Church, Morganton, partici- 



pated in all the Lenten Services there, 
and helped with the Mission held at St. 
Mary's, Quaker Meadows. This group 
of young people are active in the collec- 
tion of goods for overseas relief; several 
boxes have already been collected, pack- 
ed and sent. 

At recent meetings Lynn Cline was 
elected to be a new group leader, and 
Fuller Chaffee and Francie Lyman were 
elected to be Grace Church's delegates 
to the Interdenominational Youth for 
Christ Movement being organized in 
Morganton. 

Boone 

The recently organized Youth Group 
in Boone is growing in numbers and 
activities. They are now raising funds 
by suppers and selling advertisements. 
To get the most out of springtime in 
these mountains, hikes and outings are 

planned. 

* * * 

Bessemer City 

The Service League has occupied its 
time recently with choir work and the 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

THE CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 



refinishing of an altar for the Church 

there. 

* * * 

Asheville 

The Service League of Trinity Church, 
Asheville, has been active in many ways. 
They are assisting in raising funds for 
the new Rectory. An egg hunt and 
choir party were enjoyed at Easter. 
They are planning suppers at their Sun- 
day night meetings. 

The Secretary of the Service League 
wrote a note of welcome to the Rev. 
John Tuton, the new Rector of Trinity 
Church, on behalf of the youth of the 
Parish, and received a very nice note 
in reply, in which Mr. Tuton said that 
he was looking forward to working with 
the young people and he hoped for great 

things. 

* * * 

Valle Cruris 

The Boys' Club at Holy Cross is act- 
ing as a corporate chairman for the 
Church Garden this year. In former 
years a man was selected as chairman 
and had charge of calling all workings, 
making arrangements for the buying of 
seed and fertilizer and selling the crop. 
These duties are now assumed by the 
Club and hopes are high that this will 
be the best Church Garden Holy Cross 

has ever had. 

* * * 

Morganton Convocation 

The young people of the Convocation 
of Morganton met at Grace Church, 
Morganton, on Saturday, April 19th, for 
the annual Mite Box Presentation Ser- 
vice. The service began at 11 a. m., 
and following an address by Bishop 
Gribbin, a pageant was presented de- 
picting the needs which would be met 
by the mite box offering. A represen- 
tative from each church presented the 
offering and stated the per capita giv- 
ing. The banner for the highest per 
capita offering was won by St. Mark's, 
Gastonia. 

Following a picnic lunch, the Rev. 
Joseph S. Huske showed a Cathedral 
film, "Journey into Faith." 

The total offering was in excess of 
$550. 



Provincial Youth* 
Commission Meets 

Space does not allow for a printing in 
full of the meeting of the Provincial 
Youth Commission meeting, but follow- 
ing are some of the highlights of that 
meeting taken from the minutes. 

The mid-winter meeting of the Pro- 
vincial Youth Commission was held in 
Atlanta, Georgia, February 28-March 2. 
The meeting was called to order by the 
president, Dan Plunket, at 7:00 P. M., 
in the lounge of St. Luke's Church. A 
brief outline of the purpose of the meet- 
ing was given by the President, and a 
new secretary was elected to serve the 
unexpired term of Ethel Marie Sanders, 
who resigned to be married. Helen 
Thomas from the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina was elected to this posi- 
tion. 

Everyone present was asked to give a 
short report on the activities of the 
young people in his diocese. These re- 
ports were very informative and inter- 
esting. They are on file with the secre- 
tary. 

The session was begun at 9:00 A. M., 
with prayer by The Reverend Harry 
Tisedale. Jack Wright, Diocese of 
Alabama, gave a report on the National 
Youth Commission Meeting. At this 
meeting the adoption of the Youth Of- 
fering was the first thing taken up. This 
year it will be sent to Llawaii, for a cen- 
trally located conference center for the 
youth to come together. There are five 
or six islands in Hawaii, with approxi- 
mately fifty parishes in all; consequent- 
ly, it is hard for them to get' together. 
The National Commission also has re- 
vised PLAN, as it does each year. 
PLAN is to be on the Prayer Book for 
the coming year. 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE: 
1. Resolved: That the Provincial Youth 
Commission elect a Promotion 
Chairman from the commission, 
whose duty and responsibility shall 
be to collect and distribute informa- 
tion pertaining to youth work in the 
Dioceses of this Province. Passed. 



8 



2. Resolved: That this commission urge 
every diocese in this province to car- 
ry out as much as possible the pro- 
posed program for world relief as 
suggested by the National Youth 
Convention. Passed. 

3. Resolved: That the Provincial Youth 
Commission request the Provincial 
Woman's Auxiliary for $100 for the 
year 1947-48, as they have done in 
the past. Passed. 



"LIFTED" 

There is one very popular saying, 
repeated with the best of intentions, 
which rubs us the wrong way. It is to 
be doubted whether there is any piece 
of conversational small change that 
circulates more frequently among church 
groups; but it is usually let fall with the 
air of having made an original contribu- 
tion to the world's wisdom: "We are 
all aiming for the same place, anyhow." 

You are, of course, familiar with the 
setting in which this trite remark is sure 
to come forth. A group of friends or 
neighbors are discussing their respective 
communions — Presbyterian, Methodist, 
Baptist, Lutheran, Episcopal. Each per- 
son wishes to be understanding and 
tolerant. No one wishes to offend any- 
one else. Finally some one has a 
happy thought and comes forth with 
the wisdom that will cover the entire 
situation: "Well, we are all aiming for 
the same place, anyway." 

We must confess that we are always 
embarrassed when this thing is said. 
There is just no adequate reply to make 
to it. To attempt a rebuttal or refuta- 
tion would be ungracious, and it would 
lead to argument. But surely Christians 
ought to think of the purpose of their 
religion in higher terms. Surely we 
should not think of our religion merely 
as a fire insurance policy. Surely it 
ought to be something more than a 
scheme to assure ourselves of a man- 
sion in heaven. If Christians wish to 



be friendly with members of other com- 
munions — and this desire is to be com- 
mended — -why cannot they think of 
something better to say than this sickly 
remark. Why not instead: "We are all 
workers together for God's Kingdom" 
or "We are all trying to serve the same 
Lord." 

— The Rt. Rev. Thomas N. Carruthers, 
Bishop of South Carolina. 



BELK'S 

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Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
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The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



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Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



AGAIN OUR LAY THEOLOGIAN 

(Review of Christian Behaviour by 
C. S. Lewis; the Macmillan Company, 
New York.) 

Your reviewer is sorry, but it just 
can't be helped. Professor Lewis is pro- 
ducing significant religious tracts with 
the background of the Anglican Com- 
munion more rapidly than anyone else, 
and it's impossible to keep pace with 
him. "Christian Behaviour" was origin- 
ally a series of broadcast addresses on 
moral questions. As such it was so suc- 
cessful that there was immediate de- 
mand to put the material in permanent 
form. 

The original addresses were applied to 
the needs of a society in the front line 
of war. But the same approach is use- 
ful for a society which is suffering rather 
than enjoying peace. Morality is con- 
cerned with three things: harmony be- 
tween individuals; harmony within each 
individual; and the final goal or purpose 
of life, where we are going. As a first 
step towards true morality we have to 
take the virtues recognized by civilized 
society, but then remember that they are 
only a first step. 

There follows helpful suggestions re- 
garding social morality, the relevance of 
psycho-analysis, and the correction of 
our modern errors in regard to sex and 
marriage. Perhaps the most important 
chapters of the book are on what is in- 
volved in forgiveness and on pride as 
the great sin. Finally comes an effort 
to relate the distinctively Christian vir- 
tues, faith and hope and charity, to the 
whole moral structure we are consider- 
ing. And the book is worth owning for 
that alone, for it is a relation which we 
often miss, and yet it is absolutely essen- 
tial to a Christian life. 



10 



Question Box 



By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



our 



Do we have Deaconesses in 
Church? 

Yes. A list containing about two 
hundred names is given in the Living 
Church Annual. Deaconesses, as a 
minor order of the ministry, are con- 
fined to the Anglican churches. Mod- 
ern deaconesses first began in Lutheran 
Germany, as trained parish workers. 

What is the duty of a Chancellor? 

The Chancellor of the Diocese is not 
the same as a Chancellor of a Cathedral, 
who is a priest and a member of the 
governing body. The sole duty of a 
Chancellor is "to advise regarding any 
question of law which may arise in the 
administration of the Diocesan affairs." 
He must be a communicant and resident 
in the Diocese as well as one who is 
"learned in the law". Since it is the 
duty of the Bishop to administer the 
laws of the Church, the Chancellor is 
nominated by the Bishop. 

Are sacraments necessary for good 
works? 

The Church teaches that two sacra- 
ments are generally necessary for sal- 
vation. She does not, in any direct 
statement, declare that sacraments are 
necessary for good works. The answer 
to this question is, no. Of course, if it 
is argued that all life is a Sacrament, 
then, to be sure, there are no good works 
without Sacrament. It is a mistake, 
however, to teach that God's grace is 
confined to the sacraments. 

Who owns and operates Kanuga? 

Kanuga is owned and operated by 
the five dioceses of the Carolinas, and, 
the diocese of Louisiana. The Bishops 
and chosen laymen (men and women) 
from these dioceses form the Kanuga 
Board. This Board meets twice each 
year, and, is called the Board of Man- 
agers. It is expected, that, other south- 
ern dioceses will eventually share in the 
ownership and management of Kanuga. 



f^nlll&'- 




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IS 


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>KILLED CKAFTJ>MANSHll> 



i F i T i f wm vif ggjg gSs BBaal 



The Patterson ScJiool 




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tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 
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PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
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Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

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General Insurance 

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11 



Mrs* B* V* Holnes* 
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Asheville, &• C* 




Again — World Relief 

At the behest of the Bishop, the 
Highland Churchman would like to 
urge all parishes and missions in the 
Diocese to send in the contributions to 
the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World 
Relief. The National Council has adopt- 
ed as a slogan "The need is NOW," and 
the truth of that slogan is borne out by 
the rather frantic requests from the 
Church Missions House for the funds 
to start coming in. Every day finds 
needs piling up, needs that must be met 
without delay but cannot be met unless 
each diocese makes an early contribu- 
tion. 

In parishes and missions where the 
Easter offering was given to World Re- 
lief, treasurers are asked to send those 



funds to Mr. Redwood immediately. 
Where there has been no offering taken 
as yet, it is hoped that such will soon 
be the case. 

The need is now! ! 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 

Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression— Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
—indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



Cjjurdjman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



JUNE, 1947 



NO. 3 












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(Etjurrlfman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmorc 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Adv. Mgr. 



The Budget For 1948 

Reprinted on the editorial page this 
month, you will find the Budget for 
1948. We believe that this Budget, 
which was adopted by the Convention 
is an editorial in itself. It points up our 
responsibility for supporting the Church 
of Jesus Christ both within the Diocese 
and throughout the world. We com- 
mend it to your careful reading, and it 
is our hope that its challenge to all of us 
in Western North Carolina will not go 
unheeded. 

Need For Evangelism 
Keynote of Convention 

The need for greater evangelistic 
efforts on the part of the Diocese was the 
theme heard all through the recent con- 
vention. In his address, the Bishop 
stressed the need for clergy and laity to 
present the Church more winningly to 
men and women. 

The Rev. W. C. Leach, chairman of 
the Committee on Program and Bud- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Proposed 1948 Budgets 

Diocesan Expense Fund 

Estimated Recepits 1948 Budget 

From Endowent Fund $ 2,100.00 

From Income Ravencroft Fund 1,800.00 

From Parishes and Missions 6,240.00 

$10,140.02 

Expenses 

Bishop's Saalry and Pension $ 5,695.00 

Bishops Travel and Expense 1,300.00 

Replacement Bishop's Car 200.00 

Deelgates 1949 Convention 150.00 

Repairs Shoenberger Hall 100.00 

Salary Treasurer's Bookkeeper 60.00 

Expenses of Committees 25.00 

Printing Journal 410.00 

General Convention Expense 300.00 

Dues Province of Sewance 300.00 

Miscellaneous 150.00 

Audit Treasurer's Books 50.00 

Christian Education 100.00 

Social Relations 25.00 

Promotion and Publicity 700.00 

Mission and Extension of The Church 225.00 

Youth Commission 100.00 

Salary Secretary of The Diocese 150.00 

$10,040.02 
General Church and Mission Fund 

Estimated Recepits 

From National Council $ 3.249.00 

From Income Holt Fund 2,000.00 

From Woman's Auxiliary 250.00 

From Parishes and Missions 16,311.00 

$21,810.00 

Expenses 

Missionary Stipends $10,600.00 

Pension Preiums 1.060.00 

Appalachian School _'_ 100.00 

Kanuga Association 100.00 

Patterson School 100.00 

Archdeacon Kennedy. Travel 50.00 

Negro Work 1,000.00 

General Church Program 8.800.00 

$21,810.00 



OUR COVER 

The cover this month is a view of the 
City of Asheville, See City of the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina. It was 
here that the 25th Annual Convention 
met on May 13-14 at All Soul's Church, 
Biltmore. 



From The Bishop's Address 



Soon after the opening of the Convention, the Bishop addressed the represen- 
tatives of the parishes and missions of the Diocese, reminding them as they began 
to conduct the business of the Church of George Herbert's words, "Nothing is little 
in God's service." 

In his address, the Bishop struck the keynote which was to be heard again and 
again during the course of the Convention — the need for evangelism within the 
Diocese. He pointed out that the number of communicants in the diocese have 
decreased according to figures published for 1945. Some of this decrease he said 
was due to the drastic reduction by some parishes based on a revision of their 
parish lists. But he also pointed out that some of the decrease had to be attributed 
to the carelessness of the clergy in following up those who had been confirmed or 
who should be confirmed. There has been indifference on the part of the laity also 
that has had its effect. He called for both clergy and laity to work together to 
bring more people into the Church. 

Citing the slogan of the recent Church Congress meeting which was, "Episco- 
palians — Unite", the Bishop called for greater unity within the Diocese. He point- 
ed out that one way in which this unity could be achieved is by the faithful use 
of the Book of Common Prayer. By sticking to the wording of the Prayer Book, 
not deleting or adding, the common worship of the Church could be a unifying 
force. "Let us," he said, "use our great family heritage, the Book of Common 
Prayer." 

Two of the outgoing members of the Executive Council were mentioned for 
their outstanding work. The Rev. A. Rufus Morgan, chairman of the Department 
of Missions and Church Extension, and The Rev. Charles G. Leavell, chairman of 
the Department of Promotion. 

The Bishop reported that a very hopeful sign has been the number of requests 
he has received in the past year from men desiring to study for Holy Orders. He 
said the number was thel argest he had ever received in one year. 



Calling All Laymen 



Come to Kanuga for the Laymen's Conference of the Dioceses of the Fourth 
Province on the week-end of June 27th. 

We laymen hear much talk about the many conferences at Kanuga each sum- 
mer; but do you hear about the Laymen's Conference? Yes, it is a new conference 
and was first held three years ago with a gathering of a few interested laymen. 
Last year every Diocese in our Province was represented but two; these being, 
Western North Carolina and East Carolina. Some came from as far as New 
Orleans and Charleston, yet we failed to have representation at this interesting 
conference. 

The wonderful work that is being done by our laymen in our sister dioceses 
is most inspiring and commendable. The reports gave splendid examples of lay- 



evangelism leading to a more inspired, more instructed, and more active Church. 
We can do the same in the Diocese of Western North Carolina. 

The Laymen's Plan for Action set forth by these groups show work, thought 
and experience and, better still, it works ! This plan is a movement in the Church 
with the basic purposes of worship, study, and service. This is not to replace any 
laymen's organization, but to help them and encourage them by planning and 
coordination their work. 

The National Council with the Presiding Bishop's Committee on Laymen's 
Work offers every help for this organization and work. We, as Laymen, can 
start this movement in our Diocesse beginning this June with a few interested 
laymen attending this conference at Kanuga. We only need to have a plan of 
organization and work. This conference will show us how we may participate 
more fully in the work and the worship of the Church, and we will then have our 
place in the Church and go forward to new victories for Christ and His Kingdom. 

The conference opens with supper on Friday, June 27th, and closes with break- 
fast Monday, June 30th. The cost is only $7.00. Let us have a good representa- 
tive group from the Diocese of Western North Carolina this year. 

— An Interested Layman. 



NEED FOR EVANGELISM 

{Continued from Page 2) 

get, in making his report stated that the 
program of the Church must be the es- 
sential one of re-uniting man with his 
fellow-man and re-uniting man with 
God through the Church. The binding 
together of a disunited world and the 
binding back of man to God can only 
be done by a strong Church. 

The Department of Finance, through 
its chairman Mr. E. L. Kemper, gave a 
concrete reminder of the need for great- 
er strength. The budget that was pre- 
sented was necessarily based on the 
income that could be expected from a 
given umber of Church members. It 
was obvious from Mr. Kemper's report 
that the budget could show a greater 
out-reach of effort if the Diocese in- 
creased in numerical strength. 

In his report on the State of the 
Church, the Rev. Mark Jenkins said 
that there were two errors of which the 



Diocese was guilty. One is the failure 
of the Church to use its laity to fullest 
advantage, and the second is the failure 
of so many to understand Jesus' words, 
"Seek ye first the Kingdom of God." 

Mr. Jenkins continued by saying that 
the Church would grow if men would 
speak of religion with as much interest 
as they show in new cars and politics. 
He called for the Diocese to make the 
ensuing year one of intensive evange- 
lism. 

Definite action looking toward more 
evangelism came when Mr. William L. 
Balthis brought in a resolution that 
would foster a strong layman's move- 
ment in the Diocese. Although no or- 
ganization was suggested by the resolu- 
tion, a committee of laymen something 
like the "Bishop's Men'' in other 
dioceses might be set up. The resolution 
called for the use of the press and radio, 
and the work is to be guided by the pro- 
gram of evangelism that is being form- 
ulated by the National Council. 



Laycock Addresses Convention Dinner 



"There is no hope of peace in Asia 
for a long time to come. The war has 
only lanced a sore boil on the body 
politic of the East, and the struggle for 
democracy will be a long one." With 
these sobering words, Mr. George Lay- 
cock. Superintendent of Good Samar- 
itan Hospital in Charlotte, addressed 
the delegates to Convention who had 
met for dinner in Trinity Parish House. 
Mr. Laycock went on to say that with 
the influence of the Army removed, the 
only way our belief in democracy can 
be brought to China is through the mis- 
sionary work of the Church. 

Mr. Laycock was a former missionary 
to China, having gone there in 1940 to 
be Treasurer for the diocese of Shanghai, 
Nanking and Hankow. He was sta- 
tioned at St. John's University, Shang- 
hai when war was declared and was 
interned by the Japanese until liberated 
at the end of the war. 

The delegates to convention were 
given a vivid description of what it was 
like to be a prisoner, hearing of the 
hardships that increased as the war in- 
creased in intensity. Although 1100 
people were crowded into a tobacco 
warehouse, there was no friction among 
the prisoners, and the men and women 
displayed a great deal of resource. When 
medicine was unavailable for dysentery, 
ordinary mud and charcoal was dried 
and powdered and served as a valuable 
remedy. It was not until Easter of 
1944 that the first Red Cross packages 
started to arrive; Mr. Laycock paid 
high tribute to the Red Cross for the aid 
that was given. 

Mr. Laycock and his fellow prisoners 
watched the end of the war come through 
a peephole they had cut between their 
quarters and the guardroom. He saw 
the Japanese guards receive the news 
from the Emperorer that the war was 
over, and said that they stood transfixed 



for about fifteen minutes, unable to 
comprehend that Japan had been de- 
feated. 

In his closing remarks, Mr. Laycock 
called on Churchmen in America to be- 
gin at home to show the world that 
American democracy was worthwhile. 
He said that we cannot hope to convince 
other people of the value of the Amer- 
ican way of life if the slum conditions 
are allowed to exist and for vast por- 
tions of our population allowed to be 
underprivileged. 

Mr. Laycock was accompanied to 
Asheville by Mr. Charles Templeton 
who is on the administrative staff of 
Good Samaritan Hospital. Before the 
address, Mr. Templeton sang three 
solos. 

Trinity Church was the host to the 
Convention, serving dinner in the 
Parish house. 



New Rectors 
Honored at Luncheon 

A luncheon in honor of two retiring 
rectors and two incoming rectors of 
parishes in Asheville was held in All 
Soul's parish house on the first day of 
Convention. The Rev. I. N. Northup 
presided. He tendered the regrets of 
the Rev. G. F. Rogers who was unable 
to attend because of illness, and present- 
ed the Rev. A. W. Farnum, retiring 
rector of St. Mary's. Fr. Farnum spoke 
expressing his appreciation and the con- 
viction that St. Mary's would continue 
to serve the diocese. The Rev. Gale D. 
Webbe, now chaplain at Christ School 
and rector-elect of St. Mary's, was in- 
troduced. The Rev. John Tuton, rector 
of Trinity was next introduced and ex- 
pressed his appreciation. 



Woman's Auxiliary News 

By Elizabeth Van Noppen 

Thursday and Friday — June 5th and 
6th — the two days of the Annual Meet- 
ing at Kanuga! And such an oppor- 
tunity to hear of the work of the church, 
and discussions of world problems ! 

Miss Fletcher has planned a wonder- 
ful program. During the afternoon of 
Thursday, the 5th, Miss Edith Balm- 
ford, Executive Secretary of the Epis- 
copal Service for Youth will speak. 
Thursday evening Mr. Mayne Allbright 
will speak on "The Road to Peace — 
World Government". Here surely is a 
problem that lies on the door-step of 
every American citizen. Then the in- 
spiring preparation service by Bishop 
Gribbin just before taps. 

On Friday, the 6th, Mrs. Arthur M. 
Sherman, National Executive Secretary 
of the Woman's Auxiliary, will talk. 
Every woman of the church who can 
possibly arrange to do so should be on 
hand to hear Mrs. Sherman. 

This is a busy season for everybody- — 
house-cleaning, -gardening, letting out 
hems of the too-short dresses, so why 
bother to go to Kanuga? 

Why go to Kanuga? When asked 
that, one woman said: "How can I put 
it into words? It's like trying to de- 
scribe what one gets out of a flower 
garden, the love of a child, a beautiful 
sunset, an Easter service. To be taught 
the meaning of our Christian beliefs, to 
learn how to read, and enjoy the Bible; 
the best in church music; to have the 
companionship with worth-while church 
leaders; to see our church as a whole. 
To experience these things in beautiful 
surroundings with congenial souls. It 
is truly "All This and Heaven Too". 

Another woman answered: "To me 
Kanuga means fellowship — here we ex- 
perience what membership in the Christ- 
ian family means. It takes us out of 
our little parochial circle and makes us 
realize we are indeed members of a 



world-wide fellowship. Above all, it 
means worship. Somehow God never 
seems so near as in the quiet of the 
leafy chapel." 

The Spring Districts were well attend- 
ed, with approximately 240 women 
present. Let's top that, by having at 
least 300 women at Kanuga in June. 
Come, whether you are a delegate or 
not. 

Remember the Retreat — June 9th- 
12th. 

Adult Conference — June 12th-26th. 



Whereas, our Heavenly Father, in 
His loving wisdom has seen fit to call 
to His Eternal Home, our beloved 
Rector, Samuel B. Stroup, be it there- 
fore Resolved: 

1. That we bow in humble submis- 
sion to the will of God, who doeth 
all things well. 

2. That we the members of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary of Ascension 
Parish, wish to show our love and 
appreciation for the years of faith- 
ful service rendered by Mr. Stroup 
not only to our branch, but to the 
church and community. His ser- 
vice and counsel will be sorely 
missed. It was his habit through- 
out the years of his ministry, that 
the doors of the church were never 
closed. During the years of his 
illness, he bore same with great 
fortitude and held services under 
much physical pain, such was his 
faith and love for the church and 
the congregation. 

3. That we express to his bereaved 
family our deepest sympathy in 
their great loss. 

4. That a copy of this resolution be 
sent to each member of his family, 
a copy to the Highland Church- 
man and a copy be spread upon 
the minutes of the Woman's 
Auxiliary. 

Signed: 
Sophie E. Whitener, 
Sec. Woman's Auxiliary. 



Valle Crucis School 

This is not just a conference, it is a 
school. A school to train men and wo- 
men for a ministry in the rural mission- 
ary sections of our country. The 
Presbyterian Church, USA, has estab- 
lished a year-round rural institute at 
Warren Wilson College for this purpose, 
under the leadership of Dr. Richard 0. 
Comfort. The Episcopal Church has 
established a school for rural training at 
Valle Crucis, for the present only of 
summer duration, under the direction 
of the Rev. A. Rufus Morgan. The two 
schools are joining in a cooperative pro- 
ject from the summer of 1947 in an effort 
to enlarge the scope of the student body, 
to procure a larger staff, and to gain by 
the association of two sets of traditions. 

The aim of the school is not only to 
train those already in rural work, but to 
crystalize the interest of any who are 
considering the rural field as a vocation. 

The training for rural work has long 
been neglected by the Churches. The 
lack of training has been the main 
source of the lack of interest in a rural 
vocation and the consequent decrease 
in the number of men and churches in 
the domestic field. It is one of the 
fundamental precepts of sociology that 
the population of our nation flows 
FROM the country TO the city. The 
Churches are beginning to realize that 
they must go to the seedbed of our peo- 
ple and reach them there. The Southern 
Rural Training School is a manifestation 
of this realization. 

June 16th to August 23rd are the dates 
for the school. 



CHURCH REVIVES CONVERTS 

Chicago, 111. — In the Episcopal dio- 
cese of Chicago in the past year, 81 
persons were received from the Roman 
Catholic Church, and 1966 persons were 
aCtholic Church, and 1966 presons were 
confirmed. 



DEPARTMENT APPOINTMENTS 

The Rev. John Tuton was appointed 
by the Bishop to be chairman of the 
Department of Promotion. B. M. 
Lackey, Sr., was appointed chairman of 
Social Relations, and Mr. V. Jordan 
Brown was appointed chairman of the 
Department of Missions and Church 
Extension. This last appointment is 
notable in that it is the first time in 
recent years that a layman has been 
chairman of this very important de- 
partment of the Executive Council. 



CHEERING NEWS 

Mr. William Redwood reported to the 
Convention that although a quota of 
#3,323.00 had been set for the Presiding 
Bishop's Fund for World Relief, a sum 
of nearly $3,600.00 has already been 
given within the Diocese. This means 
that with the additional sums that will 
come from those parishes not yet re- 
ported or that have not yet had their 
campaigns, the Diocese will give gener- 
ously to the Fund. 



ST. JOHN'S, MARION 

A sterling silver Lababo Bowl has 
been presented to St. John's with the 
following inscription: "In memory of 
Louise V. Mack; presented by Frank 
Wood, Jr., 1947." 



PREACHING MISSION 

Father Robert Loosemore of the 
Canadian Cowley Fathers of Brace- 
bridge, Ontario, will conduct a preach- 
ing mission at Holy Cross, Valle Crucis, 
beginning on June 29th. This is the 
second time Holy Cross has been for- 
tunate enough to have Fr. Loosemore, 
as he conducted a most successful mis- 
sion in 1943. Fr. Loosemore is well 
known in the Diocese, having been at 
Kanuga. 



Through action of the National Coun- 
cil, the Church is now on record as 
opposing the use of public funds for 
sectarian educational purposes, specifi- 
cally bus transportation and text books. 



Assessments and Apportionments for 1948 



1948 1948 
Assess- Apportion- 
ment ment 
8% 22 l / 2 % 
PARISHES 

Asheville, Trinity $ 891.53 $ 2,507.44 

Asheville, St. Mary's 207.39 583.28 

Asheville, St. Matthias 99.66 271.86 

Biltmore, All Souls 794.15 2,233.55 

Brevard, St. Philips 135.58 381.33 

Flat Rock, St. John's 90.76 255.26 

Fletcher, Calvary 261.66 735.90 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 281.67 792.20 

Hendersonville, St. James__ 243.29 684.25 

Hickory, Ascension 226.57 637.22 

Lenoir, St. James 175.43 495.39 

Lincolnton, St. Luke's 167.64 471.50 

Marion. St. Tohn's 136.07 382.70 

Morganton. Grace 398.18 1,119.88 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis__ 233.95 657.98 

Tryon. Holy Cross 451.29 1,269.25 

Waynesville. Grace 101.07 284.27 

Wilkesboro. St. Paul's 63.80 179.42 

$4,959.69 $13,942.68 



ELECTIONS 

The Rev. James P. Burke was re- 
elected as Secretary of the Diocese. Mr. 
William Redwood was re-elected as 
Diocesan Treasurer. 

The Standing Committee elected was 
as follows: Clerical: The Rev. Messrs. 
C. G. Leavell, G. M. Jenkins, J. P. 
Burke, W. T. Capers. Lay: Messrs. 
W. L. Balthis, F. P. Bacon, A. B. Stoney, 
William Redwood. 

To the Executive Council: Clerical: 
The Rev. Messrs. John Tuton, B. M. 
Lackey Sr., William Cravner. Lay: 
Messrs. S. W. Blanton, V. J. Brown. 

Deputies to Provincial Synod: Cler- 
ical: The Rev. Messrs: Tuton, Lackey, 
Jr., Xorthup, Morgan, Jenkins, Webster. 
Lay: Messrs. Wiese, Waddell, Balthis 
and Sumner. Mrs. E. L. Kemper and 
Mrs. A. B. Stoney. 



The Rev. G. Mark Jenkins, rector of 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, was elected 
President of the Standing Committee. 



8% 22y 2 % 
ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Arden. Christ School $ 35.00 $ 85.00 

Asheville, The Redeemer __ 35.73 100.50 

Asheville, St. Luke's 16.72 47.05 

Asheville, Trinity 

Chapter Haw Creek 17.49 49.18 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 10.00 80.10 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's- 10.00 21.55 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 10.00 27.30 

Black Mountain, St. James 87.27 245.43 
Blowing Rock, 

Stringfellow Mission 30.00 56.84 

Boone, St. Luke's 24.91 70.06 

Cherokee, St. Francis 

of Assisi 10.00 10.00 

Canton, St. Andrew's 60.54 170.27 

Cullowhee, St. David's 6.00 8.50 

Edneyville, St. Paul's 13.11 36.87 

Franklin, St. Agnes 61.55 173.10 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 10.00 16.25 

Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 10.00 12.00 

Glendale Springs, 

Holy Trinity 10.00 17.30 

High Shoals, St. John's ___ 10.00 21.11 

Highlands, Incarnation 52.36 147.26 

Hot Springs, St. John's 10.00 10.00 

Ledgerwood, Chapel of Rest 25.00 81.95 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 10.00 18.33 

Lincoln, Woodside 

Our Savior 13.21 37.15 

Little Switzerland, 

Resurrection 20.00 30.50 

Morganton, St. Stephen's— 10.00 13.82 

Morganton, St. Mary's 12.00 60.12 

Murphy, Messiah 18.00 52.58 

Rutherfordton, St. Gabriel's 30.50 85.77 

Saluda, Transfiguration ___ 10.00 82.75 

Shelby, The Redeemer 67.30 189.30 

Sylva, St. John's 10.00 15.74 

Todd, St. Matthews 10.00 8.05 

Valle Cruris, Holy Cross— 43.00 133.96 

$ 799.60 $ 2,215.67 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Asheville, Grace $ 12.00 $ 17.70 

Linville. All Saints 12.00 24.00 

Penland, Good Shepherd— 12.00 30.55 

Rutherfordton, Missions __ 6.00 8.00 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 10.00 11.00 

Upward, St. John Baptist- 12.00 61.00 

$ 74.00 $ 152.65 

$5,833.38 $16,311.00 



8 



Question Box 



By Rev. J. P. Burke 

Much was said at Convention about 
Evangelism. What is Evangelism? 

The dictionary says: "it is an earnest 
effort for the spread of the Gospel of 
Christ." It is also the cultivating of the 
Gospel where it has already been plant- 
ed. It does not just mean the extension 
of the Kingdom in the sense of spread- 
ing, but, the working and praying for 
the coming of the Kingdom. It is one 
of the four purposes of the Church, but 
it is not completely separate from the 
other three, which are, worship, teach- 
ing, and administering the means of 
grace. If men are to worship God in 
spirit and truth, they must know him. 
Evangelism, therefore, is the business 
of proclaiming the Gospel to all men, in 
accordance with our Lord's command. 
We should hear much about it in our 
conventions. 

Why do zve have so few Preaching 
Missions in our Churches? 

1. Because we do not have many 
men who are well trained in this type 
of preaching. 

2. Those we do have are seldom, if 
ever, available for small parishes. 

3. Because being a successful preach- 
er of Missions is not solely a matter of 
technique and training, but it is a matter 
of inspiration — a gift. (The College of 
Preachers seeks to train men in this 
work, but it cannot supply the gift, 
which is of God.) 

4. Because the leaders of the Church 
have alowed themselves to be engrossed 
in other work which they seem to think 
is of more importance. 

5. Because there is no parochial 
strategy, no common agreement about 
our objective and the methods of reach- 
ing it. 

6. Because there is the unfortunate 
depreciation of preaching as a whole. 
While it is true that our churches are 



not just preaching stations, they certain- 
ly should be, at least, that. The ministry 
of the Word and the ministry of the 
Sacraments should go hand in hand. 
In fact, in a very real sense, preaching 
is, or, may be, a sacrament — -a means of 
grace. 

7. Because there are, no doubt, 
many who can teach the Faith, and 
teach it well, who are hidden and un- 
recognized. 



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in the following fields: Business Ad- 
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Youth News 

By Ann Shu ford 



Morganton 

The Young People of Grace Church, 
Morganton, gave a party on May 2 for 
the young people of the Presbyterian 
Church and themselves. This was one 
of the best parties ever put on by the 
league. 

On April 28 the officers of the Y.P.S.L. 
for the coming year were elected. They 
are Mary Aston Leavell, president; 
Doug Van Noppen, vice-president; and 
Tommy Lynam, secretary and treasurer. 

The latest project of the league is 
helping to collect old clothes for the 
Church World Service drive. The young 
people made a door-to-door canvas of 
church members to secure clothes, and 
have had a program at one meeting ex- 
plaining Church World Service. 

Convention 

The chairman of our Youth Com- 
mission for the past three years, the 
Rev. Mark Jenkins was reappointed to 
this position, and was further honored 
by the Convention by being elected 
President of the Standing Committee of 
the Diocese. 

Fletcher 

'1 he Young Churchman's Club of 
Calvary Church turned out en masse 
for their Corporate Communion April 
27th; following the service all went to 
the Rectory for breakfast served by Mrs. 
Jenkins and several mothers of the young 
people. After breakfast the officers for 
the ensuing year were elected as follows: 
Rod W. Miller, president; Floyd Finch, 
vice-president; Diane Miller, secretary 
and Charles Jones, treasurer. A variety 
of programs have been planned which 
promises to keep this group active, in- 
terested and growing. 

* * * 

Asheville 

The Junior Alter Guild of Trinity 
meets every Saturday before Commun- 
ion Sunday to polish brass. They are 



10 



planning to paint the Rector's Study 
when time permits. 

The Sunday night suppers have 
proved to be quite a success. Several 
mothers volunteer to cook the meal each 
Sunday and members of the League 
pitch in on the dishwashing. 

The League is planning a formal dance 
in the Parish House on June 13th. Plans 

are now being made for this event. 

* * * 

Gastonia 

The Young People of Gastonia had a 
Corporate Communion April 27th, 
Youth Sunday, followed by breakfast 
served by the Auxiliary. 

* * * 

Bessemer City 

On April 26th the Bessemer City 
Youth Group gave a wiener roast and 
had as their guests, the Gastonia Club. 
After the supper a preparation service 
was held by the Rev. Boston Lackey, 
Jr., from Shelby. The guest speaker 
was Miss Stem, the Bible teacher of 
Bessemer City High School. 



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of 

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11 



Clerical Changes 

There were a greater proportion of 
priests new to the Diocese at the recent 
convention than is usually the case. The 
Bishop made mention of these men in 
his address, and they were introduced 
at luncheon on the first day of the con- 
vention. In alphabetical order: George 
Ashton, St. Gabriel's, Rutherfordton; 
William Cravner, St. Mark's, Gastonia; 
Westwell Greenwood, Redeemer, Ashe- 
ville; Joseph Huske, St. Luke's, Lincoln- 
ton; Boston M. Lackey, Jr., Redeemer, 
Shelby; James McKeown, St. Luke's, 
Boone; John Tuton, Trinity, Asheville; 
and Ralph Webster, St. Francis, 
Rutherfordton. 

Fr. Greenwood and Dr. Cravner are 
not exactly new to the Diocese, having 
served parishes here very recently. It 
would seem that the grass is greener in 
this pasture after all. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. each Sunday, ex- 
cept first morning service and sermon 11:00 A. M. 
Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 
Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. each Thursday 

WILLIAM C. CRAVNER, Rector 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



tM|tgf)lanb 
CTjtttcJman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



JULY, 1947 



NO. 4 




St. Philips Church, Brevard 



(Etjurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Bearing Living Witness 

A true story has been brought to our 
attention which we feel should inspire 
all of us in the diocese to make greater 
efforts toward winning men and women 
to the Church. We retell the story 
briefly here as a "story of the month" 
in the hope that many similar stories 
dealing with missionary efforts will 
come from our readers. 

A young man was confirmed at St. 
Philips Church, Brevard, and then went 
to a small but good college in Kentucky. 
He found that not only was there no 
Episcopal Church in the community, but 
that the college frowned on religion or- 
ganized along "denominational lines." 
In spite of the many obstacles, the 
young man was successful in getting 
permission to have Episcopal services 
held and then attracted other students 
so much by his zeal for the Church that 
he soon had a confirmation class under 
instruction. 

The chain of circumstances, none of 
them very startling taken by themselves, 
has much to tell us. A young man, no 



different from the youth confirmed in an 
ordinary class in a small parish church, 
went to college. He wanted the services 
and sacraments of his own Church and 
he worked for them and got them. Then 
others were interested and the process 
of conversion began. We too must see 
in the confirmation of just one person 
(perhaps ourselves) the beginning of a 
process that will bring others to a know- 
ledge and love of Christ. It isn't done 
with mirrors and the aid of invisible 
wires, nor even with hoop-la and adver- 
tising campaigns. These are all valuable, 
but the real work is done by a converted 
soul and that must mean you and me. 



Our Cover 

St. Philips Church, Brevard, where 
the young man referred to in the edi- 
torial was confirmed. The Rev. Harry 
Perry is the rector. 



Summer Doldrums 

A cursory reading of the newspapers 
of this region or the plugs put out by 
the many Chambers of Commerce or 
the advertisement for this or that hotel 
or lodge would lead one to believe that 
there is nothing quite as stimulating as 
mountain air. The Highland Church- 
man has regretfully come to the conclu- 
sion that the beneficial properties of this 
highly advertised product have no effect 
on the Episcopal Church. 

This conclusion has been reached af- 
ter a careful study that involves the 
unremitting search of the editorial mail- 
box for news of the Church in action in 
the diocese. With the deadline come 
and gone and only one parish sending 
in any news, it would seem logical to 
assume that nothing has happened in 
the last month. This deduction is made 
because it is impossible for The High- 
land Churchman to believe that 
Churchpeople are too lazy to send in 
the news. 



Episcopal Church Plans Campaign of Evangelism 



Large-Scale Effort to Use Modem Tech- 
niques, Advertising, Radio, 
Motion Pictures 



To Reach Lapsed and Unchurched 



New York, N. Y. — The Episcopal 
Church has decided to launch a cam- 
paign of evangelism on a nationwide 
scale, aimed at bringing back to Church 
activity people who have lapsed, and at 
reaching with the Gospel message many 
of the totally unchurched, those number- 
ing about half the total population of 
the, United States. 

Preliminary plans for financing the 
campaign, which is expected to cost 
more than a million dollars, will be put 
in effect this fall, and the active evan- 
gelistic work will begin sometime in 
1948. 

Modern techniques will be employed 
in the campaign. In addition to every 
member visitations without financial in- 
tention, preaching and teaching mis- 
sions, study groups, and personal per- 
son-to-person work, it is planned to 
provide a nationwide radio broadcast 
series, publicity in national magazines 
and in farm papers, documentary mo- 
tion picture films, and other methods to 
enlist the active cooperation of clergy 
and laity in all parts of the Church. 

Already Church headquarters here 
are receiving messages from Provincial 
Synods, Diocesan Conventions, lay- 
men's groups, and individuals, com- 
mending the plan, and asserting that it 
will do what is most needed in this coun- 
try at this time, and expressing the be- 
lief that the methods of financing the 
campaign without a special money-rais- 
ing effort, and the actual evangelistic 
efforts planned, cannot but succeed. 

Declaring that "we must enlist the 
best people and we can get them," Pre- 
siding Bishop Henry K. Sherrill said, 



"We haven't had them before because 
we have not had a big enough program." 
It was then announced that a governing 
board of experts in promotional lines 
together with bishops and other clergy, 
is being formed to develop methods, and 
literature. 



EPISCOPAL HOUR RADIO PROGRAM 
IN SOUTHERN AREA 

Atlanta, Ga. — Starting July 13, the 
Episcopal Church will inaugurate "The 
Episcopal Hour" a radio broadcast pro- 
gram to be carried by 57 stations in the 
South. It will be on the air on alternate 
Sundays, July 13 and 27, August 10 and 
24, then a later series starting in No- 
vember. 

The programs originate in Atlanta, 
starting at 8:30 A. M. Eastern Stan- 
dard Time, 7:30 Central Standard Time. 
They are sponsored by the Episcopal 
Church's National headquarters organi- 
zation, and are produced in cooperation 
with the Southern Religious Radio Con- 
ference. Speakers will be bishops and 
other clergy of the South. 



RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY TO OPEN 
NEW CENTER 

Chicago, 111. — The Society of St. John 
the Evangelist, more familiarly known 
as the Cowley Fathers, will establish a 
Chicago community in June, the Rt. 
Rev. Wallace E. Conkling, Bishop of 
the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago, an- 
nounced at the annual diocesan con- 
vention. 

The Cowley fathers will establish 
their Chicago house at St. Francis 
Church. It will be the first monastic 
house of an Episcopal order ever to be 
located in Chicago, though the diocese 
has had convents of nuns f or several 
decades. 




The Nippon Sei Kokwai, the Anglican Church in Japan, corres- 
ponding to the Episcopal Church in the United States, has its first 
postwar Presiding Bishop. The Church was held together by its 
leadership through the war, in spite of difficulties and persecution. 
Now it is strengthening its organisation and planning for future- 
usefulness. The new Presiding Bishop, The Rt. Rev. Todomii 
Sugai (center) received his theological education at the Episcopal 
Church's Seabury-Western Seminary, at Evanston, Ills. He had 
been a teacher at St. Paul's University, Tokyo, and later was Bishop 
of South Tokyo. During a part of the war he was a solitary 
prisoner in a dungeon for defying the Secret Polics and refusing 
to join the state-sponsored Union Church. 



Fr. Sill Still Active 

The Rev. J. B. Sill "retired" a while 
back, but there is little evidence of it so 
far. Fr. Sill supplied at St. Mary's 
Asheville, during the whole month of 
May. He is engaged most Sundays, 
supplying at churches as called upon. 
He made many visits to Hickory during 
the winter while Mr. Stroup was ill, and 
has looked after the Church of the 
Transfiguration, Saluda, for some 
months. 



Gavel Presented to Diocese 

At a luncheon that preceded a meet- 
ing of the clergy in Hendersonville on 
June 4th, the Rev. J. P .Burke presented 
a gavel to Bishop Gribbin who accepted 
it in the name of the diocese. Mr. 
Burke said in his presentation remarks 
that the gavel was a real antique, dating 
back several hundred years. On each 
end of the head of the gavel, which is 
made of walnut, there is a star and a 
cross inlaid in lighter wood. 



Rural Training School at 
Valle Crucis Opens 

The Southern Rural Training School 
opened on June 16th at Valle Crucis 
under the direction of the Rev. R. 0. 
Comfort and the Rev. A. R. Morgan. 
The academic portion of the school con- 
sists of two weeks of classes and lec- 
tures which will be followed by a week 
of practical instruction. Following the 
academic sessions, the students will en- 
gage in directing daily vacation bible 
schools and conducting preaching mis- 
sions. Time will be taken after each 
mission and bible school period for an 
exchange of information and discussion 
of the effectiveness of particular pro- 
cedures. 

At the time the school opened, there 
were twelve students in residence. Miss 
Frances Barr, Penland, N. C, Mr. Jos- 
eph Carter, Gainsville, Ga., Mrs. Carol 
Evans Johnson, Norman, Okla., Miss 
Elizabeth Brigham, Blue Mounds, Wis., 
Mr. Richard Baker, Alexandria, Va., 
Mr. William Bolton, Marion, N. C, Mr. 
Edwin Garrett, Lansdowne, Pa., Mr. 
and Mrs. Phlison Williamson, Sewanee, 
Tenn., Mr. R. J. Stone, Tulsa, Okla., 
Mr. Alex Fraser, Kansas City, Mo., and 
the Rev. Richard Whiteside, Tulsa, 
Okla. 



PUTNAM NEW ADVERTISING 
MANAGER 

The services of Mr. Robert Putnam, 
layman of Trinity Church, Asheville, 
have been secured to take care of the 
advertising for The Highland Church- 
man. Mr. Putnam brings a great deal 
of experience to his new work and it is 
hoped that through his efforts and the 
efforts of others who are interested in 
expanding the usefulness of the diocesan 
paper, The Highland Churchman will 
be set on a very sound financial basis. 
All matters dealing with advertising 
should be referred to Mr. Putnam who 
may be addressed care of the White 
Transportation Co., Asheville, N. C. 



Vacation Bible Schools 

Daily Vacation Bible Schools and 
Preaching Missions are being conduct- 
ed in most of our Negro congregations 
this summer. The Rev. Tollie L. Cau- 
tion, Executive Secretary for Negro 
Work under the National Council, came 
into the Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina and began the first school and 
preaching mission at St. Stephen's, Mor- 
ganton, June 15th, running through 
June 20th. He was aided by the Rev. 
George C. Ashton, of St. Gabriel's, 
Rutherfordton. Members of St. Steph- 
en's have also assisted in the Vacation 
School, especially Miss Jewel Happoldt, 
Mrs. Belle Happoldt, and Miss Annie 
Avery. 

The Vacation School reached a peak 
of sixty children in attendance. Visual 
aids, handwork, dramatics, music, Scrip- 
ture, and recreation have been employed 
in bringing out the central theme of 
Psalm 23 and "Our Dependence Upon 
God" complimented by the story of the 
Good Samaritan and "God's Depend- 
ence Upon Us." 

In treating the central theme of "Re- 
turn to the Spiritual Life" at the Preach- 
ing Mission each evening the Rev. Mr. 
Caution taught and preached with schol- 
arly inspiration. Sub-topics were "Great 
Convictions" (The Bible); "Great 
Ideals" (Conversion); "Great Hopes" 
(The Sacraments); "Great Inspiration" 
(Prayer); "Great Living and Purpose" 
(The Aboundant Life). 

It is planned that the Rev. Tollie 
Caution will set up a similar program to 
that used in Morganton during his stay 
at other points within the Diocese. He 
is visiting Good Shepherd, Tryon, June 
22nd to June 28th; St. Andrew's, Green 
River, June 28th to July 5th; St. Cy- 
prian's, Franklin, July 6th to July 12th; 
and St. Matthias', Asheville, July 12th 
to 13th. 



"You western people have been inocu- 
lated with a mild form of Christianity 
which renders you immune from the 
real thing. 

— Gandhi 



YOUTH NEWS 

By Ann Shuford 



Patterson School 

Mr. George Wiese again provided the 
perfect setting and facilities for the 
Diocesan Youth Camp. Campers and 
faculty gave an offering of twenty-one 
dollars at the final service of the Camp, 
and this was turned over to Mr. Wiese 
to be used to help build the new gym- 
nasium being erected on the campus of 
Patterson School. 



Asheville 

Miss Helen Thomas, President of the 
Young Churchmen of Western North 
Carolina, has completed her training for 
secretarial work in her hometown of 
Gastonia, and has accepted the position 
of secretary to the Rector of Trinity 
Church, Asheville. We all wish her suc- 
cess in her new job. 



Fletcher 

The Young Churchmen's Club of Cal- 
vary Church prevailed on the Vestry of 
the Church to put an item in the budget 
for youth work in the Parish. This is 
something new for this Parish. 

Activities aplenty are planned for the 
summer months, picnics, parties, dances, 
and a stand to sell refreshments and 
sundries, the profits to go into the fund 
for a new Parish House. 



Kanuga 

The annual All-Youth Convention of 
the Province of Sewanee will be held at 
Kanuga Lake, July 27th to August 2nd. 
Those attending from this Diocese will 
be: Miss Helen Thomas, secretary of 
the Provincial Youth Commission; The 
Rev. Mark Jenkins, chairman of the 
Diocesan Youth Commission; Miss Ann 
Shuford, Vice-President of the Diocesan 
Young People, and Youth News Editor 



for The Highland Churchman; and 
Sidney Shuford, President of the Trinity, 
Asheville, youth group. 



Bessemer City 

The reorganized group of young peo- 
ple of St. Andrew's, Bessemer City, is 
setting a pace for activity that might 
well serve as a goal to others. The col- 
lection of clothing for relief, the setting 
up of a youth center for the youth of 
the city, and many social events, keep 
all busy. Officers for this group were 
elected as follows: Bill Harmon, Presi- 
dent; Harriett Hook, Vice-President; 
Willodene Hook, Secretary; Charlotte 
Thornburg, Treasurer. 



YOUTH CAMP 

Although attendance at the Diocesan 
Young Churchmen's Camp at Patterson 
School was the smallest of its four-year 
history, in many other ways it was the 
best Camp yet held. Classes were small- 
er and instruction consequently more 
thorough; evening programs were as in- 
genious and interesting as ever; the 
general spirit of the young people prob- 
ably hit a new high. The Rev. Boston 
M. Lackey, Jr., served most ably as 
Director, and instituted several benefi- 
cial changes. The Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., not only held classes on 
the "Prayer Book" but also preached 
and conducted a most helpful Prepara- 
tion Service. Others on the Staff were: 
The Rev. G. M. Jenkins, The Rev. J. S. 
Huske, Jr., Miss Patricia Page, and the 
Rev. C. G. Leavell, plus the able assist- 
ance of Mr. George Wiese and coopera- 
tion from other members of the Staff 
of Patterson School. The Rev. W. C. 
Leach, although not a member of the 
Staff this year, paid a visit to the Camp 
and performed in his inimitable style at 
the evening program. 



Patterson Camp 

Again Patterson Camp has come and 
gone. Pleasant memories, happy friend- 
ships, and most of all, new inspiration 
and knowledge, are ours because there 
are those in our Diocese interested and 
unselfish enough to give their time and 
talents to help us "know the Christ" so 
we may "make Him known" to others. 

Our thanks, from full and happy 
hearts, go out to the Youth Commission 
for all their interest and planning; to 
our faculty and counselors for wise and 
good courses of instruction; to Mr. 
George Wiese for bountiful meals, 
equipment for athletics, and the use of 
Patterson School; to our Bishop for his 
presence with us and his excellent talks; 
and most of all to our Chaplain for his 
inspiring and interesting "Studies of The 
Lord's Prayer". 

We, the young people of this Diocese 
privileged to attend Patterson Camp, 
will try to show our appreciation in 
renewed interest and work in our 
"Church on the top of these Mountains". 
Ann Shuford. 



JONES HONORED AT GENERAL 
SEMINARY 

Mr. Theodore J. Jones, a candidate 
for Holy Orders from the diocese, has 
won outstanding recognition as a stu- 
dent while at the General Seminary in 
New York. Mr. Jones was one of the 
seniors chosen this year to lead the 
meditations that were conducted each 
week during Lent. 

In his report to the associate alumni 
of the Seminary, the Rev. E. R. Welles, 
chairman of the Executive Committee, 
wrote: "The Alumni prize to the out- 
standing senior was awarded to an at- 
tractive Negro, Mr. Theodore Jacob 
Jones of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, who quite won the hearts of 
the alumni gathered to do him honor." 



In Appreciation 

By The Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Chairman of the Youth Commission 

Success has once more crowned the 
week in camp at Patterson School, June 
8-14, a week of worship, work and play 
for the group of young people we call 
"The Diocesan Youth". Under the able 
direction of the Rev. Boston M. Lackey, 
Jr., and the inspiration of the Rev. C. G. 
Leavell, Chaplain, we all, campers and 
faculty alike, spent a most profitable 
week in Happy Valley. 

It seems to me that too often in our 
fast and hectic world, work is done, ser- 
vice to others is rendered, or interest is 
shown, and never a word of gratitude is 
spoken. I, as chairman of the Youth 
Commision, want to use this means of 
expressing publicly my sincere thanks 
and appreciation to our Bishop, The Rt. 
Rev. R. E. Gribbin, to Mr. George 
Wiese, and to all the members of the 
faculty and the counselors, for their in- 
terest and labors in directing, teaching, 
and giving of themselves without stint 
to make camp week an unforgettable 
event in the lives of our Diocesan Young 
People. I wish also to thank all the 
boys and girls who attended camp for 
their fine spirit and cooperation which 
made our work a labor of pleasure. 

Let us look forward now to the Youth 
Convention to be held in Morganton the 
first part of October. Planning and 
working and pulling together, we will 
make it another high spot of success in 
our Youth program in this Diocese, of 
"knowing the Christ and making Him 
known". 



I do not envy a clergyman's life as 
an easy life, nor do I envy the clergyman 
who makes it an easy life. 

— Samuel Johnson 



FR. FARNUM GIVEN GIFT 

The clergy of the Asheville Convoca- 
tion have given a traveling bag to Fr. 
Farnum in appreciation of his many 
years of service as the Dean of the Con- 
vocation. The bag was given with the 
expressed hope of the clergy that Fr. 
Farnum will not cease his travels in the- 
service of the diocese. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY NEWS 

By Elizabeth Van Noppen 



With 114 visitors present, including 
70 delegates from 29 branches, 16 mem- 
bers of the executive board, and two 
members of the National Board, the 
twenty-fifth Annual Meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliary of the Episcopal 
Church, Diocese of Western North Caro- 
lina, began on June the fifth in the 
Chapel of the Transfiguration at Kanu- 
ga. Miss Lucy Fisher, Diocesan presi- 
dent, presided. 

The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin led 
the prayers, after which Mr. Raeford 
Sumner, of the Kanuga staff, welcomed 
the visitors, and Mrs. A. B. Stoney re- 
sponded. 

The keynote of Miss Fletcher's ad- 
dress was "Give us, O God, the strength 
to build the City that has stood too long 
a dream." After reviewing the work of 
the Auxiliary for the past year, she urg- 
ed the women to work hard to meet the 
challenge of the times. She said: "We 
can't expect non-Christians to meet the 
staggering problems of today. What we 
as Christian women do in the communi- 
ty and world must result from intelli- 
gent decisions based on earnest Chris- 
tian convictions that can come only 
from lives lived close to God in prayer 
and worship." 

Following reports from Diocesan of- 
ficers, Miss Edith Balford, Executive 
Secretary of the Episcopal Service for 
Youth, talked on the work of the Service 
for Youth, urging the women to seek 
out young women interested in this work 
and to help give them training. 

The Rev. Rufus A. Morgan, mission- 
ary to the Southwest, showed the model 
of the Chapel of St. Francis of Assissi 
to be built on the Cherokee Indian Re- 
servation, and the Rev. W. C. Leach 
talked briefly about his work with boys 
at Valle Crucis. 

Following the adoption of the Ad- 
vance Work Offering project, which will 



go to aid the Redeemer, Craggy, and to 
Trinity, Haw Creek, to help with a 
parish house, the women adjourned to 
Departmental Conferences. 

The evening session opened with the 
showing of a film, "One World Or 
None", after which Mr. R. Mayne Al- 
bright, N. C. Executive Secretary of the 
United World Federalists, spoke on 
"The Path To Peace — World Govern- 
ment". Bishop Gribbin conducted the 
very impressive preparation service. 

Friday, the sixth, started with a cele- 
bration of Holy Communion. 

The high spot of the entire convention 
was the talk by Mrs. Arthur Sherman, 
Executive Secretary of the Woman's 
Auxiliary. So important and timely was 
her message that it is printed in full on 
page 9. Mrs. Sherman talked on her 
recent trip to the Orient, and when she 
had finished each woman felt keenly her 
responsibility, and thought long on the 
words "Everyone to whom much has 
been given, much shall be required", 
and realized that "We must give of our- 
selves — our prayers, our fellowship, and 
our friendship." 

Mrs. John E. Schley, of Biltmore, 
chairman of the nominating committee, 
presented the slate of officers, all of 
whom were elected, as follows: 

Vice-President: Mrs. E. L. Kemper, 
Shelby. 

Treasurer: Mrs. May T. New, Gas- 
tonia. 

Secretary of Christian Social Rela- 
tions: Mrs. George Fletcher, Hender- 
sonville. 

Director 1st District: Mrs. Tom 
Wright, Asheville. 

Director 2nd District: Miss Aline 
Cronshey, Bat Cave. 

Delegates to the Provincial meeting 
in Atlanta, October 14-16: Mrs. Mark 



8 



Jenkins, Mrs. George Weise, Mrs. Don- 
nell VanNoppen, Mrs. Alice Maxwell. 
Alternates: Mrs. Mark Dickerson, Mrs. 
Hoskins, Mrs. George Fletcher and 
Mrs. Tom Wright. 

Mrs. J. C. Brown was made a mem- 
ber of the nominating committee, Mrs. 
E. L. McKinsey was appointed as Chair- 
man of Isolated Women, Mrs. W. G. 
Byerly, Chairman of Church Periodical 
Club, and Mrs. Owens Hand Brown, 
Chairman of Church School. 

Address by Mrs. Arthur M. Sherman 

Address by Mrs. Arthur M. Sherman, 
Executive Secretary, Woman's Auxiliary 
to the Twenty-Fifth Annual Conven- 
tion of the Woman's Auxiliary to the 
National Council, Diocese of Western 
North Carolina, Kanuga Lake, Friday, 
June 6, 1947. 

Mrs. Sherman said that she spoke to 
the x\uxiliary ten years ago when she 
came back from her first trip around the 
world. She now reported on her trip 
to the Orient. 

A group of four — Dr. Addison, Dr. 
Franklin, Dr. McGill and Mrs. Sher- 
man — went to see what effect war had 
on life and work of church in China, 
the Philippines and Japan. They were 
unable to go to Japan as Dr. Addison 
was taken with a heart attack on the 
Island of Guam and had to stay there. 
Mrs. Sherman could not go alone. The 
women of the church in Japan are re- 
organizing the Auxiliary and are having 
to hold conferences by mail. 

The party traveled mostly by air. 
They crossed the Pacific by 'plane, but 
in China and the Philippines toured the 
country by jeep, which is the official 
Bishop's car in the Orient. The jeep 
was also used in Shanghai and other 
Chinese cities. The most dangerous 
traveling was done on the mountain 
roads in the Philippines. Many bridges 
in the mountain provinces were blown 
out and they had to ford rivers, pushing 
the jeep through water. 

In Manila the party, and even the 
Bishop, were shocked at what they saw. 



No reconstruction has yet started as the 
islands are trying to establish nation- 
hood and reconstruct at the same time. 
The buildings in the municipal area are 
still in a toppling condition. It is dif- 
ficult to raise money to work on the new 
Manila. There is a seven dollar head 
tax to enter Manila and a five per cent 
value on luggage to get in. Just as we 
were leaving the island we had to hold 
a service in the ruins or pay a tax. They 
are a very brave people. We want to 
give all the backing we can to this group 
coming into independence. The high 
cost of living affects them as well as the 
missionary work. A magazine and a 
box of Kleenex costs $1.50 gold. But 
still that is not as bad as it is in China 
where the American dollar fluctuates 
from day to day. In Manila we lost the 
beautiful cathedral and all the buildings 
we owned. There are many squatters 
living in the ruins of the cathedral with 
their dogs and chickens. Where the 
altar once stood is now a bedroom. One 
cannot blame these people as they find 
it very difficult to find a place to live. 

From the site of the cathedral we 
went to St. Luke's Hospital. Although 
it had been condemned, that building 
was preserved. When the missionaries 
were interned they carried on under the 
Japanese and were still carrying on at 
the close of the war. The medical 
director, his wife and four leading nurses 
are now in this country for physical, 
spiritual and mental recuperation. The 
leadership is being taken by native 
groups and American nurses work under 
them. The Chinese chapel is used for 
different nations of the world. The 
Chinese school, with the exception of 
one building, is still standing and over- 
flowing with pupils. They work in two 
shifts and the work is flourishing in 
spite of great handicaps. 

The most exciting work is among the 
mountain provinces of the Philippines, 
where there is a very primitive group of 
people. Ten years ago there were no 
native missionaries. Fortunately, just 
before the war two men were ordained, 
who carried on in their centers through 
the war years. They can go back into 



the mountain stations only by foot or on 
horseback. They ministered not only 
to their own people but to any G. I. who 
was in trouble, sometimes helping them 
to escape. One priest prepared 4000 
people during the war years and an- 
other confirmed 800 people. The former 
religion of fear is being supplanted by 
the religion of love. One priest was the 
son of a witch doctor and had a hard 
time converting his mother but finally 
brought her to God. Most of the adults 
are illiterate. On election day five can- 
didates stood outside the city hall with 
tags of different color. The people 
voted according to the color of the tag. 
The men elected were an important 
part of our work. 

As we traveled along the mountain 
roads we were greeted by converts and 
found many of our people scattered all 
through that province. The war, in a 
sense, brought more people into the 
church but the institutions were shatter- 
ed. The women told how much the 
U.T.O. had meant to them. The con- 
crete and stone buildings were destroy- 
ed but a frame building was sometimes 
left standing. Eight people — the priest, 
his wife and five children — were living 
on the second floor of a partially ruined 
home. Some women with sick babies 
had walked ten miles for help. We were 
able to secure fifty beds from the Army 
surplus and are trying through the sup- 
ply work to keep up the hospital equip- 
ment, linens, etc. The work is most 
encouraging because of the response. 
The material to do building and the 
labor could be secured at small cost in 
Manila but in China no building is pos- 
sible at present because of the high cost 
of materials and labor. We are one 
million dollars short of what is needed. 

It was decided not to rebuild where 
the old cathedral stood but to erect a 
building on a new site for the spiritual, 
medical and educational center of our 
work, where candidates can be trained 
for the ministry and the women for their 
work. In addition, a training school for 
nurses is planned, a boys' high school 
and a girls' high »chcol. There is money 
enough to start but not to finish. We 



hope to start in the summer and move 
into it in the fall. A prefabricated build- 
ing is to be used for the seminary. 
There are twenty-five candidates for 
training, all married men. We asked 
the Women's Auxiliary for #2,000 to 
take care of them, their wives and fifty 
children. The Supply Secretary said 
she sent out allotments to the Auxiliary 
requesting sheets, pillow cases, etc. for 
the candidates and their families. To 
illustrate how little the people have in 
the way of clothing, as the children came 
up in line for baptism the same one or 
two dresses kept reappearing as they 
were used over and over by different 
children. 

China is much more complicated but 
has the same problems. The political, 
economical and whole moral structure 
was destroyed during the war years. A 
woman with a legacy of one thousand 
dollars wanted to give it to Chinese re- 
lief but wanted to wait until China set- 
tled down. At the present time, when 
the country is in a state of flux, it seems 
the church should go into China with 
all it has in the way of material and 
Gospel. I think what China and the 
world needs from America today is not 
just the economic support, but the 
spiritual values for which the church 
stands — the Gospel rather than gauze. 



FAITH 

How is it proved? 

It isn't proved, you fool. It can't be 
proved 

How can you prove a victory before 

It's won? How can you prove a man 
who leads 

To be a leader worth following 

Unless you follow to the death? 

Well, God's my leader, and I hold that 
He 

Is good and strong enough to work His 

plan 
And purpose out to its appointed end. 

— Studdert Kennedy 



10 




Seabury House, Greenwich, Conn., has been acquired for use as a 
conference center and hostel for the National organization of the 
Episcopal Church. The Presiding Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Henry K. 
Sherrill, D.D., with his family, will occupy a smaller house which 
is a part of the estate. The place belonged to Herbert L. Satterlee. 
Present plans provide for holding meetings and conferences of 
various Church organizations and agencies at the Center, and for 
the entertainment of missionaries and others who will come to con- 
fer with the Presiding Bishop. The house is named in memory of 
the first American Bishop of the Episcopal Church who was Bishop 
rf Connecticut from 1784 to 1796. 



Presiding Bishop's Fund 
for World Relief 

(Please see item on page 15 regarding 
the inaccuracy of this list.) 

Arden, Christ School $ 10.00 

Hendersonville, St. James' 187.60 

Tryon, Holy Cross 1,100.00 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 259.84 

Beaver Creke, St. Mary's 10.75 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis ___ 280.09 

Marion, St. John's 29.59 

Brevard, St. Philip's 105.45 

Boone, St. Luke's 19.17 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 3.03 

Fletcher, Calvary 200.00 

Cherokee, St. Francis of Assissi 9.45 

High Shoals, St. John's 14.00 

Highlands, Incarnation 29.50 



Lenoir, St. James 117.19 

Morganton, Grace 753.45 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 8.00 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 20.25 

Murphy, Redeemer 30.00 

Penland, Good Shepherd 21.65 

Shelby, Redeemer 25.48 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 29.37 

Craggy, Redeemer 28.36 

Glendale Springs, Holy Trinity 5.00 

Asheville, St. Mary's 248.00 

Asheville, Grace 25.00 

Chunn's Cove, St. Luke's 5.00 

Haw Creek, Trinity Chapel __ 17.50 

Black Mountain, St. James 25.00 

Woman's Auxiliary, 

Diocese of W.N.C 160.00 



Total to date £3,752.46 



11 



"Others see the Church, not through 
our arguments, but through out lives." 



"Grudge holding is the sign of a sick 
soul." 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

At KANUGA CONFERENCES 

June 1st to September 1st 

Religious Books Ecclesiastical Arts 

Church School Supplies 

Owned and Operated by 

Kanuga Conference. Hendersonville, N. C. 



NEWS FROM MORGANTON 

A son, Hugh McMurdo Leavell, was 
born to the Rev. C. G. and Mrs. Leavell 
on May 14th. 



When the Diocesan Convention meets 
in Grace Church, Morganton, May 13th 
and 14th, 1948, it is believed the new 
Rectory will be completed on the lot 
adjacent to the Parish House. A brief 
service was held on the morning of May 
26th when ground was broken for the 
Rectory. It is to be an eight room dwell- 
ing of stone. 



An addition to the Vestry room, re- 
cessing of the organ, and installation of 
a memorial window briefly sums up the 
plans for the J. Hardie Turner Memo- 
rial to be built at the same time the new 
Rectory is under construction. Neces- 
sary funds have been on hand for some 
time, but actual work delayed because 
of difficulty in securing permission to 
build. 

Mr. Turner died in July, 1943, after 
faithful and efficient service as organist 
of Grace Church for over forty years. 






The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

THE CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 



12 



REPORT SHOWS W. N. C. HIGH 
ON LIST 

In a Progress Report sent to all the 
clergy the National Council listed all the 
dioceses contributing to the Presiding 
Bishop's Fund for World Relief. The 
Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
with a quota of $3,323, had sent the sum 
of $3,863 and stood fourth on the list 
of percentage giving with 115%. This 
report was tabulated on the basis of 
money received in New York up to June 
15th and does not take into considera- 
tion funds received since that time. 
Western North Carolina, up to July 5th, 
has give na total of $4,344.83. 

The Church in North Carolina is very 
well represented in this Progress Report, 
for of the top four diocesses reported, 
East Carolina stood first with 202% and 
North Carolina stood third with 141%. 
The Diocese of Vermont was second 
with 197%. 

The Churchwide report was not too 
encouraging since it showed that the 
million dollar mark had not been reach- 
ed. It was hoped that the goal would 
be achieved by May 25th. 



GENERAL SEMINARY ALUMNI 

Bishop Gribbin, the Rev. I. N. Nor- 
thup, and the Rev. J. B. Sill attended 
the annual alumni meeting at the Gen- 
eral Seminary on May 27th. They at- 
tended their class reunion dinners that 
night, it being Mr. Northup's tenth, 
Bishop Gribbin's thirty-fifth, and Fr. 
Sill's fiftieth year of graduation. They 
also attended the Commencement Ex- 
ercises the next day. Theodore J. Jones 
of the diocese was among the graduates. 

The alumni of General who are serv- 
ing in the diocese, met for luncheon at 
the Plaza in Biltmore, on May 14th. 
They had as guests, Fr. Lambert, a 
Sewanee alumnus, and the Rev. J. N. 
Atkins, a General alumnus and former- 
ly of the diocese. There are ten Gen- 
eral men now in the diocese. 



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13 



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Question Box 



By Rev. J. P. Burke 

Why doesn't the Church keep up with 
the world? 

One reason is, the Church is not here 
to do that. The Church is to move the 
world rather than keep up with it. There 
was a time when Christians were re- 
ferred to as follows: "These that have 
turned the world upside down have 
come." True progress is not so much a 
matter of speed as it is direction. 

I think this is what our questioner 
had in mind: Why isn't the Church 
more successful in solving the problems 
of the peoples of the world? One an- 
swer to that is, too many churchmen 
are churchmen in name, but not in fact. 
Robert Browning, the poet, says that 
" — the acknowledgement of God in 
Christ, accepted by reason, solves for 
thee all questions in earth and out of 
it." We need desperately to re-think 
our churchmanship and its implications, 
and, to act upon our findings. 

What is this World Government 
Movement? 

The United World Federalists send 
out the following statement of their be- 
lief and practice. "We believe that peace 
is not merely the absence of war, but the 
presence of justice, of law, of order — in 
short, that world peace can be created 
and maintained only under world law, 
universal and strong enough to prevent 
armed conflict between nations." "... 
We will work primarily to strengthen 
the United Nations into a world gov- 
ernment of limited powers adequate to 
prevent war and having direct jurisdic- 
tion over the individual in those matters 
within its competence." Its leaders say 
there is no alternative to federation ex- 
cept wars. 

Are the Old Catholic Churches in 
union with our Church? 

The Old Catholic churches came into 
full union with the Church of England 
in 1932. The fact that they are in full 
communion, however, does make them 
Anglican. They have their own history, 
customs and liturgies. 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION 

On page 1 1 of this issue the total giv- 
en from receipts from the parishes and 
missions for World Relief is $3,752.46. 
This is not correct. The right figure 
according to Mr. Redwood's books is 
$4,344.83. There has been some hor- 
rible mistake in calculation on the part 
of the editor and he would appreciate it 
if those churches incorrectly reported or 
left out entirely would let him know in 
no uncertain terms. 



LAYMAN'S ISSUE 

The August Issue of The Highland 
Churchman will feature articles by 
leading laymen of the diocese. Men who 
are familiar figures in the lives of the 
parishes and missions will give evidence 
of the faith that is in them. There will 
not only be feature articles but news of 
what laymen have done and are doing to 
further the work of the Church in the 
dicese. 



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15 



Mrs*. J 9 5* -fcbel 



BAT CAVE CHURCH NEARLY 
COMPLETED 

The new Church of the Transfigura- 
tion at Bat Cave is now nearing com- 
pletion. All of the exterior stone work 
is done and work is progressing rapidly 
on the finishing of the interior of the 
church. 

The parish house, which is an integral 
part of the whole plant, has been com- 
plete and in use for some time. The 
congregation has been able to use the 
large parish hall as a chapel. 

The completion of this beautiful stone 
church so soon after the fire that de- 
stroyed the old frame building is a re- 
markable achievement. Much of the 
credit is due to the energetic leadership 
and skill of Father Frank A. Saylor who 
has personally supervised and helped in 
the construction. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
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Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



tMltghlanb 
CJjtttdjtnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




s 



ISSUE 



VOL. XVIII 



AUGUST, 1947 



NO. 5 




Saint James Episcopal Church, Chicago, Illinois, where 
the Brotherhood of Saint Andrew was Founded 



®i|£ ijtgjjlanii 
GUjurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Ashevilic. N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood. 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Algr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



The Layman and Personal 
Work 

A good layman of a parish in the 
diocese used to say we must convince 
the people of the "Priesthood of the 
Laity". There is a very real sense in 
which a layman is not unlike a priest. 
Like a priest, he too has been baptized. 
He too, has had the hands of the Bishop 
laid on his head. He too, has been set 
aside, enrolled as a soldier and servant 
in the battle against the world, the flesh 
and the devil. Let him work in the 
Church under the officers placed over 
him ! 

In our opinion, the first step in the 
revival of Lay Evangelism or Personal 
Work is to give the laymen a feeling of 
belonging, belonging to a Parish or Mis- 
sion, belonging to a Diocese, belonging 
to the General Church. This is not al- 
ways easy to do. It would seem that 
baptism, confirmation, and letters of 
transfer would be quite enough. All of 
us know, however, that many parishion- 
ers who have had all of these in their 
lives, manifest no feeling of belonging 
that is followed by a feeling of personal 



responsibility and a desire to do Per- 
sonal Work. They look upon the 
Church objectively. 

The Archbishop of Canterbury says: 
''The hope of England, the hope of ev- 
erywhere, is a realization of the unique- 
ness of personal responsibility; of loy- 
alty to old absolutes. Perhaps the 

signal service which Christianity has 
given to the world was first to create — 
and then to keep alive — the sense of 
obligation of man to man." 

A layman (man or woman) is a vital 
unit of the Church. Every vital unit 
is responsible for a share of the whole 
work of the Church. When we stop to 
think, all of us know that the purpose 
of a parish is the bringing of people to 
God and God to people. It is not 
enough for a layman to contribute some 
money to a parish. He must try to bring 
other people. Evangelism is one of the 
four great purposes of the Church. He 
must share in it. Seventy-five per cent 
of the world's population claim no al- 
legiance to Christ. We must "keep 
ahve the sense of obligation of man to 
man." 

One of the best Missioners we have 
ever had in our Church, the Rev. J. A. 
Schaad, once said: "Evangelism — tell- 
ing others the good news of sins for- 
given through the great love of God; 
telling others of the directing power of 
the Holy Spirit in the daily life — this 
is the inherent right and duty of every 
baptized member of Christ. And if one 
has not these personal experiences him- 
self, so that he can tell others, there is 
urgent need for conversion in his own 
life:' 

Just what method can a layman use? 
There are so many ways that one can 
bring people to God through the parish 
that one hesitates to name any. The 
New Testament stresses the personal 
way. The simpler, the more natural, 
the more direct approach is, as in most 
matters, the best. Do not wait for more 
organization. You belong now. Start 
now, today. Start where you are with 
your brother man where he is. Say, 
come with me, let us worship together. 




On St. Andrew's Day, 1883, twelve young men, with the approval of their rector, 
the Rev. W. H. Vibbert, D. D., and inspired by James L. Houghteling, agreed to 
follow the example of St. Andrew in bringing his brother, Peter, to Christ. In 
order to accomplish this purpose effectively they adopted two rules: the Rule of 
Prayer and the Rule of Service. Soon they became a spiritual force in the parish. 
Their action was emulated by groups of men and boys in other parishes of the 
Church and by 1886 the Brotherhood of St. Andrew became an organized dynamic 
force in the life of the Church. It was incorporated by an Act of Congress and 
now functions as a national organization under a charter signed by the late Presi- 
dent Theodore Roosevelt, dated May 30, 1908. 

Today the Brotherhood of St. Andrew is an association of organized groups of 
men and boys within the Church who have banded themselves together on the 
basis of the two Brotherhood rules and who desire to have fellowship with, and 
seek help from, one another as they face unitedly the urgency to "spread Christ's 
Kingdom among men, especially young men''. 

From its beginning the work of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew has been in, 
with and for the Church. It does not exist to propagate itself as an organization, 
but rather to revitalize the spiritual life of the laity of the whole Church and to 
arouse and mobilize hem to greater personal effort for Christ and- His Kingdom. 

Typical of such efforts is the annual Advent Communion for Men and Boys. 
This service was first sponsored by the Brotherhood chapter at the Church of the 
Epiphany in Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1893. Recognized as a stimulant to the work and 
worship of parish laymen, others followed the example. Today this service is 
observed throughout the Church with many thousands of men and boys joining in 
the corporate act of dedication of self at the beginning of the Church year. The 
Washington's Birthday Communion is also held in many diocese — in Long Island 
the occasion marks an impressive gathering of thousands — and further develops 
the strength of the laity, while events such as the Jamestown Pilgrimage to com- 
memorate the first Eucharist held on Virginia soil renew appreciation to our noble 
heritage. 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew has participated actively in the Church's 
program. Its members have visited the stranger, the sick, the indifferent, the 
unfortunate in hospital or prison. Brotherhood members have labored to increase 
Church attendance and to bring men and boys to Baptism, Confirmation and the 
Holy Communion. In its long life, the Brotherhood of St. Andrew has developed a 
veritable army of lay readers and candidates for the Christian ministry. 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew's program and work rest upon the twin founda- 
tion stones of personal prayer and personal service. While these rules make explicit 
the importance of the individual in the work of extending the Kingdom, the chapter 
unit is the basis of operation in the parish. 

Any group of two or more baptized men or boys may, with the approval of 
their rector, form a chapter and affiliate with the national organization. Their 
program of work is determined by the needs of their parish and the direction of 
their clergy. The two rules of Prayer and Service bring the Brotherhood ideal 
down to the level of the individual member's life by guiding him into the practice 
of daily prayer and using his personal influence wherever he can in leading other 
men and boys nearer to Christ through His Church. Thus, is provided a working 

(Continued on Page 5) 



The Layman As Vestryman 

By V. Jordan Brown 



More and more it is becoming appar- 
ent that laymen must take an active 
part in the life of the Church, and Ves- 
trymen have a unique opportunity to 
lead the way in making the Church a 
greater force for good in each communi- 
ty and in the nation. This does not 
presume that the clergy has failed or is 
not doing its share in the stupendous 
task that lies ahead of us, but does 
stress the fact that the clergy alone 
should not be expected to shouMer the 
entire burden of a movement designed 
to help the laymen as well as the 
Church. 

At the Diocesan Convention in May, 
Mr. W. L. Balthis, one of the outstand- 
ing laynrn of the Diocese, urged that 
the laymen actively support by every 
way possible the evangelistic movement 
being sponsored by the National 
Church, and the Rev. I. N. Northup in- 
troduced a resolution appointing several 
laymen to support the Bishop in this 
endeavor. In the final analysis, the 
success of this project depends almost 
entirely on how and with what vigour 
the interested laymen work. 

Vestrymen usually have a close and 
intimate relationship with their Rector, 
who should see to it that they are prop- 
erly informed about the needs of the 
Church. The material side is, of course, 
important, and must be given its due 
share of time and effort and thought, 
but too many vestry meetings are con- 
cerned with this alone, and other prob- 
lems, usually as important, are over- 
looked, or, if brought to light, discussed 
only casually, the solution being left to 
the Rector if he can find one. An excep- 
tion to this was an interesting meeting 
of our own vestry recently held at 
which, forgetting finances for a while, 
we attempted to visualize the real ob- 



jectives towards which we felt the 
Church should be moving. The discus- 
sion developed was enlightening and it 
is to be regretted that this type of meet- 
ing is so rare. In all fairness, the situa- 
tion is not due entirely to the Vestrymen 
who have for so long been led to believe 
that their main responsibility was to 
see that the necessary funds for the op- 
eration of the Parish were raised, and, 
if collected, spent. 

Now, however, we have been asked 
by our Bishop to take a greater interest 
and responsibility in the building up of 
the Church, and there are many ways 
in which Vestrymen can be of real help. 
First, they can sell themselves on the 
idea that the Church is a vital part of 
their lives, an integral part of the com- 
munity, and then sell others the same 
idea, work to create more interest in the 
life of the Church, encourage regular 
Church attendance, strive to set better 
standards of religious education for the 
children (a need that is felt throughout 
the country), and be constantly the 
right hand and main support of their 
Rector. If you are a wise Vestryman, 
you will soon realize that as an indi- 
vidual you cannot alone do all this, and 
that the vestry as a whole cannot do it 
all, but that the task requires the inter- 
est and efforts of all the laymen in your 
Parish. The need of the Church and all 
it stands for and teaches is today so 
urgent that the thoughts of all shoukl be 
directed toward it to the end that it can 
be presented to the world for what it is, 
the hope and salvation of all. 

It is fair to assume that if such a work 
were undertaken and successfully car- 
ried out that vestries would have their 
material worries lessened to such an ex- 
tent that more and more time could be 
given to the spiritual side of the Church. 



The Layman's Thoughts on The Highland Churchman 

By Charles Latimer Grigsby, Redeemer, Asheville 



During the last few years we have 
seen the Highland Churchman grow 
from a four page to a sixteen page paper 
with many improvements both of policy 
and appearance. This is due to the in- 
terest and work of the splendid and 
thoughtful editors and their staffs. 

The Highland Churchman is our 
own publication and it is published 
primarily for the laymen in our Diocese. 
In the majority of our church families 
it is the only religious publication re- 
ceived and, through the action of our 
Convention last year, a copy should be 
in each home. 

The aim of the Highland Church- 
man is twofold. From the standpoint 
of the Diocese, the Highland Church- 
man should seek to present all Diocesan 
plans and activities set forth by our 
Convention and the Executive Council. 
It should help promote the work of the 
general church and the National Coun- 
cil both at home and abroad. It should 
seek to rid the Church of the narrow 
parochialism so evident in the majority 
of our congregations. It should help to 
encourage and evangelize the un-church- 
ed in our local community and diocese. 

From the standpoint of the individual 



layman, the Highland Churchman's 
aim should be to bring to the layman 
news and information concerning the 
church beyond our own parish boun- 
daries. It should strive to further in- 
struct us in the principles of the Chris- 
tian faith and practice. It should help 
to deepen and strengthen our own per- 
sonal spiritual life and bring our people 
together into a closer fellowship with 
our Lord and Saviour. 

Is the Highland Churchman ful- 
filling its function? We can see that it 
is in part but not altogether. 

The greatest need and emphasis 
should be on instruction and teaching, 
the need for which is felt by all good 
laymen. The goal for each of us in this 
year of evangelism should be toward a 
better inspired, better instructed, and 
more active church through education, 
worship, and service. Through the 
pages of this magazine, as in no other 
way ,the Church can teach and inspire 
us to be better Christian Evangelists. 

May God help us this year to have 
a deeper faith in the Church of God as 
set forth by the Episcopal Church, that 
we may begin NOW to convert the 
world about us to our Lord's way! 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW IN THE UNITED STATES 

(Continued from Page 3) 
method for those men and boys of the Church who desire in and through their 
lives to reach out beyond the observance of a formal church relationship to touch 
lives that they, too, might share in the work and blessings of the Church's life. 

How can the Brotherhood of St. Andrew best serve the Church? By following 
the example of our patron saint, for in St. John 1:41 is recorded: "He first findeth 
his own brother Simon and saith unto him, 'We have found the Messiah' . . . and 
he brought him to Jesus." 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew follows the example of St. Andrew. Knowing 
our own weaknesses and shortcomings, we strive only to serve by bringing others 
to "Christ that they may become greater and stronger members of the Church of 
tomorrow. Membership in the Brotherhood of St. Andrew is a serious business — 
it puts first things first. 

The Church today is devoting its faith and energy to the great task of evan- 
gelism, but a large portion of its laymen have not yet realized their own individual 
responsibility in this task. It is therefore important for those who do recognize 
this obligation to stand together in a national organization, in order that they more 
effectively lead other laymen to a similar acceptance of the Church's call to active 
service. The Brotherhood of St. Andrew affords an opportunity to do this. 



The Brotherhood of St. Andrew in The Diocese 



Bv William L. Balth'u 



From a Layman's standpoint, I think 
the idea of devoting an issue of The 
Highland Churchman to Evangelism 
is a very happy thought. I would like 
to suggest to all in the Diocese, The 
Brotherhood of Saint Andrew as ONE 
means of furthering the prosperity of 
our much beloved but much neglected 
Church. Nationally and internationally 
the Episcopal Church has only one or- 
ganization for men whose sole objective 
is the leading of men and women to 
Christ into His Church through Baptism 
and Confirmation. There are so many 
ways in which this objective can be ob- 
tained, in reaching those from young to 
old, it is difficult to be specific in such 
a short article as this. With two or more 
gathered together in a Chapter, The 
Brotherhood of Saint Andrew is pledged 
to carry out the Brotherhood's two 
Rules of Service, namely, to pray daily 
for the spread of Christ's Kingdom 
among men and especially young men, 
and to make at least one earnest effort 
each week to lead some man near to 
Christ through His Church — Prayer and 
Service. These rules while set lid as 
definite obligations of Members of the 
Brotherhood, are in reality nothing more 
than the obligation of every Baptized, 
Confirmed Communicant and should 
not be shied away from. Do we not 
publicly profess our belief in an al- 
legiance to Christ and His Holy Church 
when we are Baptized and Confirmed? 
Our presiding Bishop, our Bishop, and 
all the leaders of our Church are as one 
to the need of Evangelism, and warn us 
of "The complacency and smugness that 
beset us as Christians." May we snap 
out of this complacency, each and every- 
one of us, and offer our services to our 
Spiritual Leaders! There is a definite 
place for the Brotherhood of Saint An- 
drew in every congregation, whether it 
be Evangelical or Anglo Catholic — 
"Seek ye first the Kingdom of God". 
The movement was begun at our last 



Diocesan Convention to arouse our Lay- 
men and Laywomen, and the Brother- 
hood of Saint Andrew stands ready to 
throw all of it's resources into this move- 
ment. 

Statistics indicate that we have less 
Communicants than we had two or three 
years ago. Let's change this condition 
by supporting our Bishop and make it 
a progressive, up and going Diocese. 
We have so much that is sacred and 
attractive about our branch of The Real 
Church, we will be held responsible un- 
less all embrace its privileges and duties. 



THE STORY OF THE MONTH 

A couple of years ago, a layman of 
St. Luke's, Boone, was visited regularly 
by a salesman who was not a Church 
member. At each visit the conversation 
would turn to religion. The layman, 
himself a recent convert, not only stress- 
ed the privileges of Church membership, 
but put Church books and other litera- 
ture into the salesman's hands. After 
many such visits, the salesman was 
brought to confirmation in another par- 
ish in the diocese. 

There was nothing complicated about 
this lay-evangelism. The layman was 
zealous and eager to talk about his 
Church; religion was not considered to 
be something too mysterious to be talk- 
ed about in the ordinary course of busi- 
ness and social contacts; so today there 
is one more man serving the Church. 



Full details regarding the program 
of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew 
may be secured by contacting its Na- 
tional Council member in the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina, W. L. 
Balthis, Gastonia, N. C, or by writ- 
ing the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, 
105 West Monument Street, Balti- 
more 1, Maryland. 



The Layman as Acolyte 

By Forrest B. Wood 



An acolyte, or ''one who serves," 
might be considered an order of the 
priesthood of the laity. Certainly his 
functions entail a responsibility of which 
he should be ever aware and for which 
he should be ever thankful. 

In the Second Office of Instruction, 
the question, "What is your bounden 
duty as a member of the Church?" is 
answered in part by, " . . . . to work and 
pray and give for the spread of His 
Kingdom." Each of these three require- 
ments are especially applicable to an 
acolyte. 

His main work is to assist the priest 
in offering the Holy Sacrifice. This is 
what he loves above all other duties; it 
may not therefore, be thought of an 
actual work, but when one considers 
that celebrations of the Eucharist fre- 
quently come at an early hour, the 
temptation to get that extra hour or 
two of sleep is overcome only by a feel- 
ing of obligation that he has a job to do. 

The acolyte is taught to pray by our 



Lord Himself in the Lord's own service. 
At each Eucharist he hears intentions 
for varied circumstances, for all sorts 
and conditions of men, for the whole 
state of Christ's Church. Thereby he 
learns that important form of prayer — - 
intercessory prayer — prayer for others 
— and he becomes more and more a part 
of Christ's Body and less and less of an 
individual. He lifts up his heart with 
the angels and archangels and the whole 
company of heaven, worshipping with 
them the King of Kings. 

The acolyte gives in the giving of him- 
self to God's service. He also gives his 
services to men at the important times 
of their lives: at their baptisms, their 
confirmations, their communions, their 
marriages and at their burials. 

From the altar the acolyte goes out 
into the world of laymen of which he is 
such an integral part. It is in this busy 
world where the fruits of his work, his 
prayer and his giving are evident to all 
with whom he comes in touch. 



The Presiding Bishop's Committee on Layman's Work 

By The Reverend Arnold M. Lewis, Executive Director 



The thought of the Episcopal Church 
is turning more and more to the field 
of Evangelism. The Church, clergy and 
laity ahke, are coming to a realization 
of the fact that if the Christian Way of 
Life is the only certain foundation upon 
which a peaceful world can be created, 
the Church must arouse itself from its 
lethargy and catch a vision of the im- 
mense task which confronts us. 

The laymen of the Church must play 
an important part in the extension of 
the Christian religion into their com- 
munity and into the world. Many lay- 
men, as individuals and in groups, are 
already at work. They recognize that 
they are Christ's representatives and as 
such are striving to make their indi- 
vidual lives more effective. They want 



their parish and mission to really count 
for something in their community. They 
want their lives to be of such a caliber 
that they will speak by action for the 
things in which they believe. In other 
words, they definitely want to bring 
others into the Christian fellowship. 

The Presiding Bishop's Committee on 
Laymen's Work is vitally interested in 
this whole program of Evangelism. As 
a movement within the Episcopal 
Church, this Committee is endeavoring 
to instill in the laymen of the Church 
new enthusiasm and new incentives. 
Through suggested programs and es- 
pecially through its "Plan of Action" 
the Committee is witnessing new en- 
thusiasm on the part of the men of the 
Church. Laymen are becoming cog- 



nizant of the fact that the Episcopal 
Church is a democratic organization, 
that the effectiveness of the Church is 
not dependent entirely upon the clergy. 
Organized in 1942, the Presiding 
Bishop's Committee on Laymen's Work 
has built up a chain of leadership ex- 
tending from keymen in parishes and 
missions through Diocesan Chairmen 
and Provincial Chairmen to the Com- 
mittee and the Presiding Bishop. 
Thorugh suggested programs and the 
interchange of ideas, and where ade- 
quate leadership has been forthcoming, 
it can honestly be said that the laymen 
of this Church are on the march ! 




Rev. R. B. Campbell 

The Vestry has announced that the 
Rev. Robert Bailey Campbell has ac- 
cepted a call to the Church of the Ascen- 
sion, Hickory. He will take over his 
duties on September 15th, following a 
four and a half years rectorship of the 
Church of the Incarnation, Cleveland. 

Mr. Campbell, a native of Virginia, 
is a graduate of Washington and Lee 
University, and piior to his ordination 
to the priesthood had taught at Episco- 
pal High School, Alexandria, Va., Roan- 
oke College, and at Duke University, 




SAMUEL S. SCHMIDT, PRESIDENT 
OF THE BROTHERHOOD OF ST. 
ANDREW IN THE UNITED STATES 

Mr. Samuel S. Schmidt, resident of 
York, Penn., is Designing Sales Engi- 
neer for the Grey Iron Casting Com- 
pany of Mt. Joy, Penn. He is a graduate 
of Princeton University and has for 
years been active in various clubs and 
civic affairs in his home city. 

Mr. Schmidt has served for a number 
of years as vestryman and Senior War- 
den in his home parish. His activities 
in his Diocese include chairmanships of 
Forward in Service, Department of Pro- 
motion, Reconstruction and Advance 
Fund and Editor of the Diocesan paper. 
He is a member of the National Council 
of the Episcopal Church and serves on 
the Divisions of Youth and Army and 
Navy. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 



The Brotherhood in Japan 



Lt. Col. Paul Rusch, GHQ, Tokyo, 
twenty-one years ago a civilian, found 
himself in Tokyo on a business mission 
in no way associated with the Church. 
Having free time before sailing for 
home, he visited St. Paul's University 
where meeting Bishop McKim resulted 
in a vital change in his life's plans. The 
Bishop was seeking to fill a vacancy on 
the University's faculty and urged Paul 
to help him out by taking the job. 

Though it meant an adjustment to a 
sub-standard living base, Paul Rusch 
accepted this urgent challenge on trial, 
having no intention of remaining beyond 
one year when he counted on some mis- 
sionary to take his place. One year 
later on St. Andrew's Day, November 
30, 1927, standing before the altar in 
All Saints' Chapel of the University, 
Paul Rusch with Professor Negishi and 
ten students recently baptized for whom 
Paul has assumed the responsibility as 
their godfather were admitted into 
membership of the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew. Thus, the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew began in Japan as well as a 
career which has had a tremendous in- 
fluence ever since among the Japanese 
Christians — the story of another Paul 
who was not disobedient to the Heaven- 
ly Vision. 

Writing to his friends in 1947, Col. 
Rusch said: 

"From that moment I found some- 
thing — something new I never quite 
knew before — Prayer and Service. It 
became my basic blue print for these 
eventful twenty years now past. Some- 
how, and provided no wars get in my 
way, I think I have ten or more good 
years to extend this pattern stemming 
from the Brotherhood Camp Seisen Ryo 
(Pure Spring) in a practical way to the 
men, women and children of Kitakoma 
Gun (county) of Yamanashi Prefec- 
ture (state)." 

These plans for the years ahead on 
the part of Paul Rusch and the Broth- 



erhood of St. Andrew in Japan form the 
basis of this article. Up to the war, he 
had 1,200 picked young men enlisted 
for active service as members of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew in spreading 
Christ's Kingdom, instructed and train- 
ed at the Brother's Camp Seisen Ryo 
with the cooperation and leadership of 
the Bishops and clergy of the Japanese 
Church an dthe Missionary Bishops and 
clergy of the American, English and 
Canadian Churches. 

After seven months confinement in 
the Sumire Camp, Paul Rusch was re- 
patriated and returned home in 1942. 
After a short rest, he began service as 
an officer in the Military Intelligence 
Section at Fort Snelling, Minn. While 
there he arranged for regular celebra- 
tions of the Holy Communion for of- 
ficers and GI's and instructions for 
many who wished to be baptized and 
confirmed. He brought hundreds of 
Niseis to St. Mark's Church, Minneapo- 
lis for special services. 

Five years later Paul Rusch was back 
in Japan preparing for the 15th Annual 
Meeting of the Brotherhood of St. An- 
drew, which was held on St. Andrew's 
Day, November 30, 1946, on the 
grounds of bombed-out Central Theo- 
logical College, Tokyo. Much that was 
the lifework of countless missionaries 
in Japan was wiped out by the war 
years, but somehow even through the 
darkest days a little flame of love and 
brotherhood was kept alive. Its rebirth 
into a great flame of hope was manifest- 
ed by that great gathering on St. An- 
drew's Day, and the day will long be 
remembered in Japan as a "shot in the 
arm" for the Diocese of Tokyo. 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Ashevffle, N. C. 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



St. James, Hendersonville 
The Rt. Rev. Keh-Tsung Mao, D.D., 
of Shanghai, China, preached on the 
Seventh Sunday after Trinity. Bishop 
Mao was consecrated in 1946. This was 
his first visit to America. He came over 
during the early part of March at the 
invitation of the National Council and 
has spent the past five months visiting 
various churches and conferences. He 
preached and lectured at the Kanuga 
Conferences. He left following the ser- 
vices at St. James for Xew York and 
Shanghai. 

A daily vacation Bible School was 
conducted in July, under the leadership 
of Miss Aline Cronshey. About forty 
were enrolled. The theme of the School 
was "Indian Life." Chief Ho-To-Pi of 
Oklahoma who was attending the Art 
Colony here made a visit to the School 
and told the children of his people and 

their life. 

* * * 

Grace Church, Waynesville 

The Rector's Guild was instrumental 
in sponsoring a Paint Campaign that 
resulted in the painting and refurbishing 
of the church. The work was done dur- 
ing the past Spring, so that Grace 
Church could present a pleasing appear- 
ance to the many who visit Waynesville 
in the summer. 

After some time spent in the hospital, 
the Rev. Robert Tatum, Rector, has 
been able to regain some strength and is 

again conducting services. 

* * * 

Christ School, Arden 

A new Chaplain has been secured to 
succeed the Rev. Gale D. Webbe who is 
now rector of St. Mary's, Asheville. He 
is the Reverend John Grosvenor Dahl, 
formerly of the Missionary District of 
Haiti, and will take up his duties at the 
School early in September. 

Father Dahl is thirty-two years old, 
a graduate of Berkely Divinity School, 
New Haven, Conn., from which semi- 



nary he received an S. T. B. degree in 
1941. He was ordained to the Diaconate 
in June, 1941, and advanced to the 
Priesthood in March, 1942. He was 
canonically resident in the Diocese of 
Michigan during the year 1941-1943 and 
in the Missionary District of Haiti from 

1943 until this year. 

* * * 

St. Matthias, Asheville 

A new roof is being put on the church, 
a piece of work which was absolutely 
necessary. The congregation is quite 
pleased with this achievement, and with 
activity going on apace, it is hoped that 
it will not be too long before a full-time 
rector can be secured. Archdeacon Ken- 
nedy has been in charge of services. 

* * * 

Admission Service at Penland 

On the eleventh of July, the Reverend 
Peter W. Lambert, Jr., was admitted 
into the Oratory of the Good Shepherd. 
The service consisted of Solemn Mat- 
tins, Sung Litany, and Sung Eucharist. 
The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin, Bishop 
of Western North Carolina, presided 
and received the vows. The Rev. W. C. 
Leach was celebrant, the Rev. Gale D. 
Webbe, Deacon, and Brother Robert, 
0. G. S., Sub-Deacon. Priests present 
also included: J. S. Huske, D. } .Stroup, 
A. P. Mack, J. N. Atkins, Af W. Far- 
num, J. H. Rhys. 

Father Lambert was elected by the 
American College last December, but 
the service of admission was withheld 
until a member of the Oratory could be 
present. 

The Oratory of the Good Shepherd is 
a society of priests and laymen of the 
Anglican Communion striving to live a 
life of devotion and service under the 
inspiration of a Rule. Founded in 1913 
at Cambridge University, England, it 
includes the Bishops of Ely and North- 
ern Rhodesia as members. The present 
Superior is Canon Wilfed Knox of Pem- 
broke College, Cambridge. The Prior 



in 



of the American College is the Rev. 
Robert P. Casey, 0. G. S. of Brown 
University. There are also modified 
Rules for priest and lay Companions. 

* * * 

Holy Cross, Valle Crucis 

Ground is being broken and bull-doz- 
ing being done in preparation for the 
erection of a '"parish" hall. As Holy 
Cross is still a mission, it is not proper 
to refer to the proposed building as a 
parish house, but it is a bit confusing 
to say "mission house" with the original 
mission house still standing that now 
serves as a residence for a School Farm 
employee. But the important thing is 
that work is starting and it is hoped 
that the building will be completed be- 
fore cold weather. Present plans call 
for the erection of a twenty by forty- 
eight foot Quonset hut that has already 
been tagged, "The Tin Can." It is esti- 
mated that with funds already at hand, 
it will still take another thousand dol- 
lars to finish the building completely. 

A new oil burning furnace has been 
ordered, and it is expected that it will 
be installed in the rectory in the very 
near future. Most of the purchase price 
is already in hand, and it is hoped that 
the Fall crop of corn in the Church 
Garden will be of substantial help in 

meeting the rest. 

* * * 

Valle Crucis School 

With the conclusion of an academic 
period of one month, the students who 
are attending the school for rural work 
started on a sereis of Bible Schools. In 
the first ten-day period, schools were 
held at Murphy, Cherokee, Cartoo- 
chaye, and Happy Valley. In the sec- 
ond period, schools were conducted at 
Glendale Springs, Happy Valley, Holy 
Cross, Valle Crucis and St. John's, Low- 
er Watauga. 

There will be one more ten-day period 
before the school closes for the season. 
It is expected that an even larger rural 
training school will be held next year. 
The Rev. E. D. Butt, formerly of the 
diocese, has been named director of the 
1948 session. 



Youth News 

By Ann Shu ford 



Morganton 

The Y. P. S. L. of Grace Church, 
Morganton, for their last meeting of the 
summer had a picnic June 1 at Lake 
James. The whole group attended 
Church service at St. Paul's Mission. 
held by the Rev. Charles Leavell, before 
going to the lake. The afternoon was 

spent swimming and boat riding. 

* * * 

Hendersonville 

The Young People of St. James re- 
organized on June 15th and elected the 
following officers: Mary Turner, Presi- 
dent; Anne Waldrop, Vice-President; 
Sue Briggs, Secretary and Treasurer; 
Betty Coachman, Dick Wooten, and 
Alcera Turner, Program Committee. 
This group is serving as the choir for 
evening services during the summer and 
they are organizing a Junior Vestry. 
Monthly Corporate Communions are on 

their program. 

* * * 

Fletcher 

As the summer advances, members of 
the Young Churchman's Club of Cal- 
vary, Fletcher, find more and more ac- 
tivities to keep them busy. The Club 
has sponsored several square dances 
with Rod Miller calling. On the 18th 
of July they had their first square dance 
that was open to the public. The pro- 
ceeds went into the treasury and will be 

used at the discretion of the Club. 

* * * 

Keep in mind the Diocesan All-Youth 
Convention to be held in Morganton, 
October 3rd and 4th. 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

At KANUGA CONFERENCES 

June 1st to September 1st 

Religious Books Ecclesiastical Arts 

Church School Supplies 

Owned and Operated by 

Kanuga Conference, Hendersonville, N. C. 



Book Review 

By Rev. J. H. Rhys 



IN DEFENCE OF CHRISTIAN 
FAITH, a review of "TRUTHS MEN 
LIVE BY" by Rev. John A. O'Brien, 
Professory of Philosophy of Religion, 
University of Notre Dame. (Macmil- 
lan Company, $2.15) 

"The reviewer, a clergyman, wishes 
that every minister of the gospel might 
read this book, but perhaps it would be 
too much to wish that most ministers, 
including himself, could be as gifted as 
Dr. O'Brien in their approach to the 
truths that men live by." Rev. J. R. 
Perkins in the Chicago Sunday Tribune. 

The publishers have printed this tes- 
timonial on the jacket of the book. In 
addition it has had a good press from 
periodicals of such divergent points of 
view as The Living Church and The 
Christian Century. In consequence, 
this defence of the Christian Religion 
can be commended to the reader who 
wants faith explained in simple terms. 

However, it would be an easy matter 
to criticise the book. In many places 
it's approach to the theme appears shal- 
low, as if Dr. O'Brien were trying to 
talk down to a group of college freshmen 
who could not face the problems of re- 
ligion. In fact, there is no exhaustive 
consideration of most of the questions 
involved in the reality of God and of 
Religion as man's bond with God. Ar- 
gument is on one side only, where there 



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should be some recognition of objec- 
tions. And a linguistic purist would 
probably insist that anyone who would 
use a preposition as the last word in the 
title of a book would not be capable of 
profound writing. 

Having stated the objections, we can 
consider the values found in Dr. 
O'Brien's words. The work is in five 
sections. First the classical arguments 
for the existence of God are restated, to- 
gether with some new scientific testi- 
mony of the same sort. The chief value 
of this section, however, is an account 
of the nature of God at the end. The 
second section consists of seven chapters 
devoted to religion as man's bond with 
God, which is not particularly effective. 
It is the third part which makes the 
book worth while, an explanation of the 
soul as God's image in man. This is a 
subject to which Christians do not give 
nearly enough thought, and Father 
O'Brien presents important truth with 
clarity and understanding. It will repay 
study. The section on the Bible and 
Science is confined to a discussion of 
creation and evolution, strongly defend- 
ing the evolutionary hypothesis. There 
is much information here, though not 
all of it is pertinent to a Christian philo- 
sophy of life. The final part is concern- 
ed with Jesus Christ, the Founder of the 
Christian Religion, an exposition of the 
traditional Christian teaching, simple 
and on the whole effective. A valu- 
able bibliography is added commending 
works by Protestant as well as Catholic 
writers. 

Had "Truths Men Live By" been less 
highly commended, y o u r reviewer 
would, doubtless, have been spared 
some disappointment. Those who come 
to it with more modest expectations will 
certainly be rewarded for the reading 
of it. There is nothing in this book to 
which we cannot all assent, however 
much it leaves unsaid. Parts 3 and 5 
can be suggested to all as useful read- 
ing. The rest of the book will be help- 
ful to those who are beginning to study 
the Christian Religion from a mature 
point of view. It is a start, and we can 
go on from there. 



12 



Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



You sax our Diocese is twenty-five 
years old. What are some of the out- 
standing achievements of its first twen- 
ty-five years? 

1. The Valle Crucis Summer School, 
devoted chiefly to Teacher Training and 
Young People's Work, was conducted in 
1925, 1926, and 1927. When it was 
moved to Kanuga in 1928 it had an en- 
rollment of 150, the first Carolina Dio- 
ceses cooperating. It was quite the 
strongest religious educational work ex- 
perienced, up to that time, in the Caro- 
linas. The starting of Camp Horner 
which later became Camp Patterson. 
The opening of a school for Rural 
Church Workers at Valle Crucis. 

2. Two parishes, St. John's, Marion, 
and St. Philip's, Brevard, have been 
added making the total 18. 

3. New church buildings have been 
completed at Boone, Brevard, Canton, 
Fletcher, and Valle Crucis. Substantial 
sums of money have been raised for 
new church buildings at Gastonia and 
Hendersonville. 

4. Xew buildings have been erected 
at Christ School, Appalachian, and Pat- 
terson. A new rectory is being built at 
Morganton. 

5. Financial aid received from the 
General Church for this Diocese has 
been reduced from about sixty thousand 
dollars to above five thousand dollars. 

6. The total of all receipts of this 
year (1946) is more than in any year 
of our history. 

7. The work of the Woman's Auxili- 
ary ''has grown in organization, in scope 
and in volume. There were on Jan. 1, 
1947, forty-one branches." 

8. Our Diocese had a leading part in 
the securing of the Kanuga Property, 
in the beginnings of that Institution 
which is of inestimable value to the 
whole Church. 



These are just some of the obvious 
achievements. Spiritual things, minis- 
trations of our Bishop and his clergy to 
our people, the tourists, and the large 
number of young people that attend 
camps and conferences and schools in 
this Diocese are the real and permanent 
things that cannot be estimated. 



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13 



THE COUNT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE. N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
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Headmaster 




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Rediscovering 
The Family Fellowship 

The family fellowship is a prototype 
of the ideal social unit given to us by 
God. This is demonstrated in its most 
sublime form in the Holy Nativity scene 
at Bethlehem where the Incarnate Son 
of Gcd was cradled in the intimacy of 
the family group. 

It is in the family circle that the basic 
roots of our religious life germinate and 
grow. Whatever the flower of our later 
experiences in life, it is in the family 
group from which we come that much 
of its beauty and strength takes form. 
The family is certainly the most prac- 
tical and most perfect mode through 
which to express and cultivate the Chris- 
tian way of life. 

"Secret of American Democracy" 
The story is told of an English writer 
who in the late 90's visited America to 
discover to his own satisfaction the basic 
strength of this thriving democracy. One 
night the train on which he was riding 
was wrecked. The injured writer was 
carried into a neighboring farm house 
where he was cared for until he was 
able to resume his journey. The first 
morning when he joined the family at 
the farm house for breakfast, he was in- 
vited into the parlor. There he sat with 
other members of the household and 
listened to the farmer read from the 
Bible and lead the family in prayers. 
"This;' he later wrote in his diary, "is 
the secret of American democracy. " 

Christian Loyalty 

Secular influences have made deep 
and serious inroads on family life. 
Christian loyalty must be preserved in 
the family circle at all costs. This can 
be most effectively done when the fami- 
ly unites as a fellowship in mutual 
adoration and praise of Almighty God 
as revealed in Jesus Christ. Where the 
personal allegiance of each member of 
the household to Jesus Christ i san ac- 
cepted fact and is expressed by all in a 
common fellowship within the family 
circle, the individual differences and 
preferences of its constituent members 



14 



begin and end in a common loyalty to 
God in Christ. 

What to Do 

1. Pray together 

Begin with a few simple prayers. Use 
the family prayer section of the Prayer 
Book, special books of devotions. Pray 
for things in which the members of the 
group are particularly interested — s:ck 
friends, decisions to be made, problems 
to be solved. 

2. Study together 

Daily Bible readings, even if not more 
than one verse, discussed and listened 
to by the members of the family form 
a unifying force which individual Bible 
study can never do. In some families 
it will be possible to read a chapter or 
more; in others, only a verse. In addi- 
tion to Bible readings, many groups 
have developed the practice of reading 
aloud contemporary books on religious 
subjects as well as discussing the com- 
ment in Forward Day by Day. A fami- 



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ly forum of this nature will yield much. 

3. Worship together 

There is no finer expression of the 
family fellowship than worshiping to- 
gether in Church. Make it a habit to 
worship God every Sunday in His 
Church as a family group. 




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15 






A Plea For Sewanee 

According to figures lately sent to 
The Highland Churchman, the dio- 
cese is badly in arrears in its financial 
help to the University of the South at 
Sewanee, Tenn. The Diocese of West- 
ern North Carolina is asked for $300, 
and to date only $25 has been sent. 
Sewanee Sunday should be observed in 
every parish and mission of the diocese, 
a special collection asked for, and some- 
thing should be said of this university 
that is the only Church university in the 
Fourth Province. 

All contributions for the support of 
Sewanee should be sent to Mr. Wm. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Drive, Bilt- 
more Forest, N. C. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



Crjurcfttnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 
VOL. XVIII OCTOBER, 1947 NO. 7 




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\ "Ye Shall Be Witnesses Unto Me" \ 

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s S 

I EVERY MEMBER J 

1 CANVASS ! 

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\ December 7 

5 

1947 I 

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November 9 



9lF» Sjtgtjlani) 
(Eljurrijman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Bishop Gribbin's 
Resignation 

When the House of Bishops meets in 
November, the resignation of our dio- 
cesan, The Right Reverend Robert E. 
Gribbin, will be considered. At this 
writing there is little reason to suppose 
that his resignation will not be accepted. 
We have all known of the stubborn 
throat ailment that has troubled the 
Bishop, and despite our hopes, we know 
that it has not responded to treatment 
as long as the Bishop has had to stay 
in this climate. We cannot in good 
conscience expect the Bishop to carry 
the tremendous burden of his office 
when his health is not equal to it. But 
the blow of his decision to resign is 
nonetheless severe. We shall sorely miss 
our Father in God who has been our 
leader and counselor for the past four- 
teen years. 

In an editorial the Asheville Citizen 
said in part in paying tribute to the 
Bishop, "In all his duties and in his 
many non-secular interests. Bishop 
Gribbin has been a model churchman 



and citizen. His gentleness and kind- 
liness are traits which would call for 
emphasis in lesser men but which are an 
unremarkable part of his inspiriting 
character." 

There are a great number of priests 
and laypeople who remember the dark 
days of the depression when Bishop 
Gribbin was consecrated. They and 
those who have come after have seen 
the Bishop struggle with the problems 
of making a weak diocese into one that 
is just now on the threshold of a great 
opportunity for expansion. All of us in 
the Diocese of Western North Carolina, 
together with his successor who will be 
chosen, owe it to the Bishop to see that 
his work and ideals are carried forward. 



The All-inclusive Canvass 

There is a growing feeling in the 
Church against special campaigns for 
funds. First, there was the Recon- 
struction and Advance Fund. Then 
came the three-year campaign for the 
Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Re- 
lief. Each year, too, there is Theological 
Sunday. All of these have been in 
addition to special parish and diocesan 
appeals. 

In most cases it is not so much the 
amount of the appeal as the fact that 
the clergy are beginning to think that 
their ministry consists of the presenta- 
tion of one drive after another. 

This need not remain true. Between 
now and the middle of December, three- 
quarters of the parishes will conduct 
Every Member Canvasses. In most 
cases, it would be so very easy to add 
all special appeals to the budget of the 
Every Memer Canvass and to secure 
pledges for all purposes at one time. 
Such a plan would not make an im- 
possible budget. The Reconstruction 
and Advance Fund is over. The 
Presiding Bishop's Fund for World Re- 
lief in most cases would require the 
addition of about 3 per cent to the total 
parish budget. The amount raised for 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Bishop Gribbin To Resign 



It has been announced through the 
religious and secular press that Bishop 
Robert E. Gribbin of Western North 
Carolina has presented his resignation 
to the Presiding Bishop, The Most Rev. 
Henry K. Sherrill. Action on this resig- 
nation cannot be taken until the meeting 
of the House of Bishops which will meet 
in Winston-Salem on Nov. 4th. The 
canon law of the Episcopal Church 
states that a bishop's resignation must 
have the concurrence of the House of 
Bishops. 

Bishop Gribbin was elected to succeed 
the late Bishop Junius M. Horner as 
diocesan at a special convention held in 
St. Francis' Church, Rutherfordton on 
October 17, 1933. His consecration to 
the episcopate took place on the Feast 
of the Conversion of St. Paul, January 
25, 1934, in St. Paul's Church, Winston- 
Salem. At that time he was rector of 
that parish. A graduate of The Citadel, 
Charleston, S. C, and the General 
Theological Seminary, he had served as 
assistant in several southern parishes, 
as chaplain overseas during World War 
I, and rector of St. John's Church, 
Wilmington, N. C, prior to becoming 
rector of St. Paul's Church. In 1940 
he was recalled to active military duty, 
serving for one year as post chaplain 
at Fort Jackson, S. C. 

A throat ailment that did not respond 
to treatment in mountain climate was 
the reason for the Bishop's decision to 
resign. He left for the West at the end 
of August in an attempt to find a more 
suitable climate. In a recent letter from 
California to the president of the Stand- 
ing Committee, the Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
the Bishop stated that he is now able 
to conduct two services a Sunday with- 
out discomfort. Mrs. Gribbin is ex- 
pecting to join him shortly in California 
and he does not expect to be back in the 
diocese until after the middle of 
November. 




In his absence, the Bishop has turned 
the ecclesiastical authority of the dio- 
cese over to the Standing Committee. 
All matters that are usually referred to 
the bishop should be addressed to the 
Standing Committee through the presi- 
dent, the Rev. Mark Jenkins of Calvary 
Church, Fletcher. 



THE CHURCH FIRE 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 

This is an old friend under a new 
name. We have been notified that what 
we all have known as "The Church 
Properties Fire Insurance Corporation" 
now is carrying on its labors under the 
slightly less burdensome name "The 
Church Fire Insurance Corporation." 
The address is unchanged, although we 
might back up the patient pleas of the 
post office for zone numbers by remind- 
ing one and all that the correct desig- 
nation in writing the Corporation is 
New York 5, New York. 



The Every Member Canvass 

By The Rev. John Tuton 



Many people think of the Every Member Canvass in terms of raising a 
Church budget. This is almost the only purpose, as the Canvass is experienced 
in many parishes. The real purpose, however, it seems to me, is for a canvass to 
express the life of the Christian fellowship and to enrich and make secure the life 
of that fellowship. For the fellowship to survive in the modern world it seems 
important that there must be money, but when the canvass is seen only as a 
money making plan it is doomed to failure. It must be seen in its largest aspects 
if it is to achieve its deepest meaning. 

PLANNING: A great deal of planning must go into any Every Member 
Canvass if it is to be a success. The greatest care must be exercised in selecting 
the chairman for the canvass and there may be times when it is wise to appoint 
co-chairmen. One man may have particular abilities along one line and another 
along equally important, but different lines. Once the chairman or co-chairmen 
have become convinced of the importance of the canvass the whole matter of the 
number of people to be engaged as captains and workers must be decided upon 
as well as the whole system of office controls. It is generally found that there must 
be several meetings of the chairman with the rector before the whole system of 
procedure and controls can be worked out. 

Also in connection with the planning, a tentative budget must be worked out 
by the finance committee for presentation to the Vestry or in some instances, the 
tentative budget can be worked out by the Vestry where there is no financial com- 
mittee. There are many different things which must be geared in together if the 

canvass is to work out properly. 

Assume, then, that a tentative budget has been approved by the Vestry and 
that the chairman has met with the rector. What next? 

DATE CONTROLS: A whole system must be worked out having to do with 
the time for each meeting; the time for the canvass itself; the time for the mailing 
of the publicity; the time for talks on the budget, to be given to the whole congre- 
gation, preferably by a layman. In our own parish there were 12 such date 
controls, in addition to the meetings previously held by the control committee. 
These included one meeting of all the captains and colonels with the rector and 
co-chairmen; one meeting in which the control committee considered people who 
might need special handling in the canvass (due to their being in the parish only 
part of the year, or due to the fact that there has been some misunderstanding); 
two meetings of all the workers, one of which was a dinner meeting, etc. 

PL'BLICITY: Publicity having to do with the Canvass should include not 
only those recommended by the National Church, but should include a letter from 
the rector emphasizing the spiritual emphasis of the canvass and some newspaper 
publicity, which seems to be advisable to reach the shut-ins. Canvasses by them- 
selves mean nothing, but when they are the expression of the life of the fellowship 
or of the services which the minister gives, they become charged with meaning. 

As part of the publicity planning, it seems right and proper that some other 
word should be given by the laymen of the parish to the whole congregation. 
There could hardly be a parish or mission in which it would be impossible to find 



one layman capable of presenting some abstract of the church's work and it should 
be presented on Sunday morning at the regular service. 

THE CAPTAINS AND WORKERS: The captains and workers should be 
chosen with very great care, for they will run from time to time into very delicate 
situations wherein they will need tact and an understanding of the whole meaning 
of the canvass. In some parishes it seems advisable to send the workers out two 
by two and this is probably even generally the best plan. In other parishes they 
may be sent out individually. 

It doesn't seem wrong that some friendly element of competition might enter 
in. In Trinity there are two colonels, twenty captains, and eighty workers at the 
date of this writing on the canvass, and a friendly competition has been developed 
through the fact that the men and women are divided into divisions with the 
losers promising a dinner to the winners in the canvass. The winners are not 
determined by the amount pledged but by the number of pledges obtained on the 
cards assigned. 

The worker should make an attempt to arrange an appointment by telephone 
with the individuals upon whom they are calling, and if the individuals are not to 
be at home on the particular day assigned for the canvass they can make the call 
earlier than that date so that almost a complete report can be given at a particular 
hour of the day of the canvass. 

CONCLUSION: The canvass is a vital part in the fellowship. No techniques 
will achieve final results unless there is something of a real fellowship to begin with 
and yet the canvass can be one of the agencies whereby the fellowship becomes 
more real to all who participate in it and it is our belief that when the canvass is 
conducted with this as the chief motive the financial results will in all probability 
take care of themselves. 



THE ALL-INCLUSIVE CANVASS 

(Continued from Page 2) 

Theological Sunday varies widely in 
different parishes but its inclusion in the 
budget would not represent a large sum. 
Then, too, this year, each parish is asked 
to add three per cent to its total budget 
to make possible a weekly Episcopal 
Radio Hour and the production of fine 
motion pictures of the Church's work. 
With the exception of disasters which 
no one can anticipate, these represent 
all of the special National appeals and 
all of them added together would not 
increase the parish buget more than six 
or seven per cent, at most. Including 
special diocesan and parish appeals, 
certainly ten per cent is a generous 
figure. 



It might be argued that those who 
give could not possibly increase their 
pledges by this amount. This may be 
true although we know of very few 
parishes where more than a handful are 
giving to the Church in accordance with 
their means. There is, however, a way 
in which this matter need not be de- 
bated. Certainly, in almost every 
parish, there are at least ten per cent of 
the people who are never reached in the 
Every Member Canvass. If we can 
make the 1947 visitation a real Every 
Member Canvass in which every one is 
asked to help support the work of the 
Church, then the increased budget will 
be subscribed. This is not merely a 
theory. It is a fact. Georgia and 
Oregon already are doing it on a dio- 
cesan basis. 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN 
FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS January, 1, 

Assessment Parishes 

Made Paid 

$796.07 $397.98 Asheville, Trinity 

183.49 91.75 Asheville, St. Mary's 

119.27 48.00 Asheville, St. Matthias 

797.47 265.84 Biltmore, All Souls' 

122.18 36.00 Brevard. St. Philip's 

67.96 Flat Rock, St. John's 

246.62 149.00 Fletcher, Calvary 

262.12 131.10 Gastonia, St. Mark's 

208.93 72.00 Hendersonville, St. James' 

209.93 Hickory, Ascension 

155.72 92.00 Lenoir,' St. James' 

150.40 Lincolnton, St. Luke's 

99.65 99.65 Marion, St. John's 

369.99 269.99 Morganton, Grace 

235.17 240.00 Rutherfordton. St. Francis' 

382.55 Tryon, Holy Cross 

85.23 85.23 Waynesville, Grace 

55.75 41.82 Wilkesboro. St. Paul's 

Organized Missions 

30.00 20.00 Arden. Christ School 

16.65 16.65 Asheville, Redeemer 

12.00 12.00 Asheville, St._ Luke's 

16.74 Asheville, Trinity Chapel 

10.00 Bat Cave, Transfiguration 

10.00 10.00 Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 

10.00 Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 

82.41 Black Mountain. St. James' 

30.00 30.00 Blowing Rock, St. Mary's 

22.85 Boone, St. Luke's 

54.34 Canton, St. Andrew's 

6.00 Cullowhee, St. David's 

10.00 Edneyville, St. Paul's 

53.43 Franklin, St. Agnes' 

10.00 4.00 Franklin, St. Cyprian's 

10.00 10.00 Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 

10.00 10.00 Glendale Springs, Holy Trinity 

10.00 10.00 High Shoals, St. John's 

45.88 30.00 Highlands. Incarnation 

10.00 Hot Springs, St. John's 

20.00 Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 

10.00 Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 

10.00 9.00 Lincoln, Woodside, Our Saviour 

20.00 Little Switzerland. Resurrection 

10.00 Morganton, St. Stephen's 

12.00 Morganton, St. Mary's 

18.01 18.01 Murphy, Messiah 

26.08 20.96 Rutherfordton. St. Gabriel's 

10.00 10.00 Saluda, Transfiguration 

64.16 64.16 Shelby, The Redeemer 

10.00 Sylva, St. John's 

10.00 10.00 Todd, St. Matthew's 

38.36 37.66 Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 

6.00 6.00 Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 

Unorganized Missions 

12.00 Asheville, Grace 

5.00 5.00 Blackstone. Mission 

10.00 Cashiers, Good Shepherd 

8.00 Ednevville, St. Peter's 

8.00 Lincolnton. St. Paul's 

12.00 Linville. All Saints 

10.00 10.00 Penland. Good Shepherd 

6.00 Rutherfordton, Missions 

12.00 12.00 Upward, St. Tohn Baptist 

10.00 10.00 Tryon, Good" Shepherd 

6 



NORTH CAROLINA 
1947 to August 1, 1947 



Apportionment 


Made 


Paid 


$2,238.95 


$1,586.33 


516.07 


427.73 


335.43 


56.35 


2,242.95 


918.27 


343.64 


105.93 


191.15 




676.73 


504.13 


737.22 


376.87 


585.64 


580.52 


590.44 


23.25 


437.98 


341.70 


422.99 


134.93 


280.26 


181.93 


1,098.00 


722.86 


661.42 


35.10 


1.075.91 


48.75 


239.72 


243.00 


156.79 


117.60 


79.30 


30.00 


46.83 


61.41 


28.13 


38.21 


47.07 


4.91 


76.86 


32.65 


19.52 


19.52 


25.48 


37.00 


231.78 


2.63 


56.84 


63.44 


64.26 




152.83 


10.75 


7.93 




14.80 


21.00 


150.28 


19.81 


15.25 


10.00 


19.52 


4.61 


15.25 


6.42 


21.19 


21.19 


129.04 


156.25 


14.64 




76.86 


46.86 


18.30 




20.16 


26.35 


30.50 




13.62 




13.86 


18.10 


50.66 


56.66 


73.36 


8.68 


81.74 


81.74 


186.46 


87.59 


7.32 




7.93 


7.93 


107.88 


99.84 


10.00 


26.23 


16.18 


27.00 


6.00 


1.40 


10.00 




10.37 




9.76 




24.40 




30.50 


80.97 


8.44 





61.00 


29.10 


10.07 


10.07 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



St. Mary's, Asheville 

St. Mary's Dart, the monthly parish 
paper, reports that a Teaching Mission 
is to be held in the parish during the 
week of October 19-24, Sunday through 
Friday nights at 8 o'clock. 

A booklet, entitled "St. Mary's 
Church" has just been printed that sets 
forth the teaching of the Church, its 
ceremonial as it is found at St. Mary's, 
and much else of interest. The booklet 
also contains some handsome photo- 
graphs of the interior and exterior of 
the church. 



St. Francis' Church, Rutherfordton 

A weekly bulletin is now being print- 
ed, setting forth the hours of service, 
and containing week-by-week parish 
news. 

During the week of October 19th there 
will be a Preaching Mission. The rector, 
the Rev. Ralph K. Webster, will be the 
missioner, preaching a series of sermons 
on the Faith and Practice of the 
Episcopal Church. 



Trinity, Asheville 

The Men's Club of Trinity Church 
was organized at a meeting held at the 
church on July 30th. Mr. Julian Wood- 
cock presided as temporary chairman of 
the initial meeting that had an attend- 
ance of fifty men. 

The Rev. John Tuton, rector, spoke 
of the needs for such an organization. 
Mr. Woodcock discussed the Every 
Member Canvass, and Mr. Robert 
Putnam and J. Fuller Brown were named 
co-chairmen of the committee for the 
Canvass. 

Officers of the Men's Club who will 



serve until an election of officers can 
be held are Girard Haven, president, 
Beekman Huger, vice-president. Dr. 
William Powell, secretary, and George 
Herndon, treasurer. These men are the 
officers of the former Laymen's League 
of Trinity. 

The newly-organized group will 
gather at the church for a supper meet- 
ing the fourth Wednesday in each month. 



All Souls', Biltmore 

A parish festival was held on Thurs- 
day, August 21, from 4 to 8 p. m. It 
was for the benefit of The Presiding 
Bishop's Fund for World Relief and for 
the local chapter, the All Souls Com- 
munity Committee for World Relief. 
In this way, $450.00 was contributed to 
the Episcopal Church World Relief pro- 
gram. The festival was under the dir- 
ection of the Woman's Auxiliary branch 
of the parish. 



Holy Trinity, Glendale Springs 

Mrs. Eloise McKinsey, for the past 
two years the mission worker at Holy 
Trinity, has resigned her work there. 
She will start further academic training 
at one of the church training schools in 
the near future. The Highland 
Churman has been unable to ascertain 
whether this work will be at Windham 
House in New York or in the Woman's 
Division of the Philadelphia Divinity 
School. 

Mrs. McKinsey started her work at 
Glendale Springs on St. Barnabas Day, 
1945, and has done splendid work there, 
particularly among the young people. 
She has also been quite active in dio- 
cesan-wide affairs of the Woman's 
Auxiliary. 




Church Consecrated At Bat Cave 



In a strikingly beautiful service, the 
Church of the Transfiguration, Bat 
Cave, was consecrated by the Right Rev- 
erend Paul Matthews, retired bishop of 
New Jersey, on Sunday, September 
28th. Bishop Matthews was acting as 
the episcopal deputy for Bishop Gribbin 
who was absent from the diocese. 

The procession of ten visiting priests, 
torch bearers, thurifer, crucifer, Father 
Saylor, Bishop Colemore of Puerto Rico 
and Bishop Matthews formed in the 
parish house and went to the front door 
of the Church. There Bishop Matthews 
rapped on the door with his pastoral 
staff and asked permission to enter. On 
being admitted, the procession went 
through the Church saying Psalm 24. 
The authorization from the Standing 
Committee for consecration was read by 
Father Saylor who also presented the 
Instruments of Donation to the Bishop. 

Bishop Matthews, vested in cope and 
mitre and attended by torchbearers, 
thurifer and Fr. Saylor, then made pro- 
cessions to the various parts of the 
Church for the blessings of the font, 
choir space, altar and nave. Then the 
sentence of consecration was read by 
Dr. James M. Washburn. Dr. Wash- 
burn then spoke briefly on the work of 
rebuilding, voicing the gratitude of the 



congregation for Fr. Saylor's devotion 
and technical skill. Greetings were also 
brought by the Rev. C. B. Vance, pastor 
of the Baptist church in Bat Cave. 

The preacher at the service was the 
Rev. Mark Jenkins who took at his text 
Nehemiah 13:14. He reminded the con- 
gregation that the consecration of the 
Church was only the beginning of their 
real task. The Church building, with 
all its beauty and all the effort that went 
into its construction, was only a place 
where the people were to set up house- 
keeping, keeping house to the glory of 
God. 



Sees Need For Evangelism 
In Rural United States 

Prof. William V. Dennis of Pennsyl- 
vania State College, recently completed 
a survey of the Episcopal Diocese of 
Easton. He stressed the need for evan- 
gelism all through the Episcopal Church, 
but with particular emphasis on rural 
areas. His survey revealed that in the 
Diocese of Easton the population is 
195,000, of whom 145,000 are totally 
unchurched. The diocese covers 3,384 
square miles. 



8 



Woman's Auxiliary News 

By Elizabeth Van Noppen 



From the reports coming in many of 
the Auxiliaries have been most active 
during the summer months. All Souls, 
at Biltmore, held a Bazaar in August to 
raise funds for the Presiding Bishop's 
Fund for World Relief. Church of the 
Redemer, Asheville, and Trinity Chapel, 
Haw Creek, also had most successful 
Bazaars, raising money for their build- 
ing funds, the former to build living 
quarters for the priest-in-charge, and 
the latter to complete the Parish Hall. 
Both of these churches will receive help 
toward their buildings from the Advance 
Work Offering this fall. 

St. Luke's, Chunn's Cove, Asheville, 
is the newst branch in the Diocese, 
having organized in June. They meet 
on Tuesday evening of each week, and 
have sponsored church suppers and 
carnivals throughout the summer. A 
hearty welcome to such an enthusiastic 
group ! 

Mrs. Alfred Chapman, Chairman of 
the National Board of the Woman's 
Auxiliary, spoke at a luncheon meeting 
of Trinity Auxiliary in Asheville. Aux- 
iliary members from five branches were 
present. 

Miss Lucy Fletcher spoke to a young 
women's group in Brevard in July, and 
at the Convocation of Asheville in late 
August. 

Mrs. Eloise McKinsey, who is chair- 
man of Work among Isolated Women, 
will be at Valle Crucis this year. She 
will try to contact all isolated women 
and organize them into an Auxiliary 
branch by mail. 

Mrs. Mark Jenkins, of Fletcher, was 
guest speaker at All Souls and at Bre- 
vard during the summer. 

Mrs. Cecil Hoskins, Devotional Chair- 
man of the Diocese, spoke to the 
Auxiliary at Edneyville in August. 



Delegates are making plans to attend 
the Twenty-First Synod which is to be 
held in Atlanta October 14-16. 

Many of the Auxiliary members have 
had no opportunity to read or hear the 
resolutions adopted at Annual Meeting 
as the goal for this coming year. They 
are printed below for your prayerful 
attention and enthusiastic support: 

Be it recommended: 

1. That each branch form a prayer 
group to pray regularly and specifically 
for the most pressing needs of parish, 
community, diocese, nation and world. 
(Especially for our own Diocese during 
the next few months.) 

2. That each branch try to have at 
least four corporate communions each 
year, two to be at the time of the 
presentation of the U.T.O. 

3. That each branch be asked to 
use an Installation Service, preferably 
at a regular Sunday service, for install- 
ing their newly elected officers at the 
beginning of the year, and that a special 
service be included in the Year Book. 

4. That each member assume the 
personal responsibility of contacting 
women of the Church who are not active 
in the work of the Auxiliary, to try to 
interest them and bring them into the 
work. 

5. That a chart of achievement be 
made and kept by each branch, based 
on the above recommendations, so that 
each branch may check itself on these 
points. 



DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION 

On this page and on page 7, reference 
is made to the whereabouts of Mrs. 
Eloise McKinsey. The Editor regret- 
fully announces that she is now in Phila- 
delphia, 209 St. Mark's St. 



Youth News 

By Ann Shuford 



Asheville 

The Trinity Y.P.S.L. met September 
7 to elect officers. Andy Weaver was 
elected president, Carline Speir, vice- 
president; Peggy Jones, secretary; 
Laura Chapman, treasurer; Merelene 
Johnson, worship committee; Betty 
Elias, service committee; Sidney Shu- 
ford, and Jane Kennedy, Membership; 
and Polly McDuffie, proram committee. 
With these new officers, and with some 
advisors to be chosen later, the group 
hopes to build up attendance and begin 
work on new projects. 



Morganton 

After a summer of inactivity the 
youth group of Grace Church resumed 
their meetings September 7. To initiate 
their winter activities, they gave a party 
for those young people who are leaving 
Morganton and going away to school. 

They were gracious hosts to the 
Youth Convention held October 3 and 4 
in their parish. A special group of the 
host parish along with the President, 
Helen Thomas; Vice-President, Ann 
Shuford; Sidney Shuford of Asheville, 
Mary Turner of Hendersonville, Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, Chairman of Youth 
Commission met in Morganton, Septem- 
ber 10, and worked out the interesting 
program enjoyed and profited by all the 
delegates to this Convention. More 
news of the plans laid here will be forth- 
coming. 



Fletcher 

As one of their many summer activ- 
ities the Young Churchman's Club of 
Calvary sponsored two public square 
dances. The young people ran a re- 
freshment stand selling coca-colas and 
donuts. The dances were called by Rod 



Miller, president of the club. Over 
seventy dollars was cleared and an 
electric fan for the church chancel was 
bought with part of this money. 



Kanuga 

The Provincial Youth Convention 
was held at Kanuga Lake July 27 to 
August 2nd. It was a week packed full 
of fun, business, and worship. Sidney 
Shuford of Asheville was elected as 
Provincial Youth Commission member 
from the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina. He replaces Helen Thomas 
whose term expired this year. Those 
attending from this Diocese were Sidney 
Shuford, Ann Shuford, Helen Thomas 
and Rev. Mark Jenkins, Chairman of 
Youth Commission of the Diocese. The 
convention was honored to have as its 
guest speakers Dr. Marshall from the 
University of the South, Sewanee, and 
Mr. Fisb from 281, New York. 

Officers for the coming year were 
elected. Dan Plunket, Diocese of At- 
lanta, President; Jack Wright, Diocese 
of Alabama, Vice-President; Edith 
Winslow, Diocese of North Carolina, 
secretary, and Pat Sinette, Diocese of 
Lexington, treasurer. The members of 
the Executive Council elected were The 
Rev. John Womack and Mary Harpor 
of South Carolina. 



Hendersonville 

The youth group of St. James was 
host to an interdenominational meeting 
Sept. 7th with about fifty young people 
attending. The first Sunday of every 
month is set aside for this purpose and 
each meeting is at a different church. 
The meeting at St. James was to initiate 
the new officers. The guest speaker 
was Mrs. F. E. Pierson, noted artist 
from Miami, Florida. 



10 



Standing Committee 
To Meet 

The Standing Committee of the dio- 
cese will meet at St. Francis' Church, 
Rutherfordton, on November 11th. The 
primary purpose of this meeting will be 
to consider the course of action neces- 
sary for the election of a successor to 
Bishop Gribbin. Such an election will 
be necessary if the House of Bishops at 
its meeting accepts Bishop Gribbin's 
resignation. 

If the Standing Committee should 
find that an election is necessary, and 
it is decided that a special convention 
is to be called for that purpose, it will 
benecessary to give a sixty days notice 
of such special convention. It is not 
expected that a special convention could 
take place until January 1948 at the 
earliest. If a convention is to be held, 
it is expected that the Standing Com- 
mittee will appoint a nominating com- 
mittee that will bring in names of those 
who would be considered for election. 
This committee would have only power 
to make recommendations, and further 
nominations can be made from the floor. 

Article 6 of the Constitution of the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina 
states concerning an election to the 
episcopate: 

'"The election of a Bishop shall be 
made in an Annual Convention, or in 
a special convention called for that pur- 
pose, at least sixty days before the time 
appointed, the object being stated by 
notice in writing and sent to every 
Clergyman and Vestry and Mission 
Committee of the Diocese. 

The election shall be by orders, and 
a concurrence- of a majority of both 
orders present and voting shall be 
necessary to determine the choice, pro- 
vided that two-thirds of all the clergy 
entitled to vote and lay delegates from 
two-thirds of all the parishes and con- 
gregations entitled to representation be 
present; otherwise, two-thirds of the 
votes of each order shall be necessary 
to a choice." 



Regional Church Congress 
To Meet October 21st 

The Regional Church Congress, 
which embraces the five Carolina Dio- 
ceses, will meet in the Church of the 
Holy Comforter, Charlotte, on October 
21st. This Carolina Church Congress 
was born in the Convocation of Ashe- 
ville. The meeting last Fall was held in 
the Church of the Advent, Spartanburg. 

The Charlotte Aleeting will be a 
dinner meeting. The dinner will be 
provided by the Ladies of the Church 
of the Holy Comforter, the Rev. Iven- 
son B. Noland, rector. The supper will 
be served at 6 P. M. 

After supper, two papers will be given 
as follows : 

1. What is Christianity? By The 
Rev. C. R. Haden, Jr., rector of St. 
Philip's Church, Durham, N. C. 

2. Personal Evangelism — A Church 
Congress paper written by the Rev. 
Samuel Shoemaker, rector of Calvary 
Church, N. Y. This paper will be read 
by the Rev. John W. Tuton, rector of 
Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C. 

Discussion will follow each paper. 

Rev. James P. Burke of Henderson- 
ville is President of the Congress and 
the Rev. Charles G. Leavell of A/lorgan- 
ton is Secretary. 

Those desiring to attend the Con- 
gress meeting should write either to 
the Secretary or to the Rev. Iveson B. 
Noland. Both men and women of the 
Carolinas are invited to attend. 



"Away with our Episcopal com- 
placency. GO TELL!" 



Bishop John B. Bentley of Alaska 
has accepted his election as vice- 
president of the National Council. He 
will take office January 1, 1948, and will 
also be Director of the Overseas De- 
partment. 



11 



Book Review 

By The Rev. J. M. W. Rhys 



The Monastic Life, a review of "Re- 
ligious Communities in the Episcopal 
Church and in the Anglican Church in 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

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June 1st to September 1st 

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Canada", compiled by the Poor Clares 
of Repaartion and Adoration and pub- 
lished by the Holy Cross Press in con- 
nection with the 1945 centennial obser- 
vance of the revival of the monastic life 
in the Anglican Communion. 

This book should be required reading 
for every communicant of the Church. 
And the reason is that none of us should 
be ignorant of any important phase of 
the Church's life. The Religious 
Orders, both for men and women, exert 
an influence far beyond their numbers, 
and their influence has been entirely 
for the good of the whole Church. The 
Presiding Bishop at the time of the cen- 
tennial observance of the revival of the 
religious life gave his blessing to the 
celebration, and contributed a foreword 
to the book. But it is not enough for 
us to know that such Orders do exist, 
and to say we approve of their work. 
We must also know who they are and 
what they do, in order that we may be 
able to do our duty in supporting their 
undertakings, and that those of us whom 
God calls to serve Him with this com- 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 

Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 

for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 

Clerical Directory. 

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Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH PROPERTIES FIRE INSURANCE 
Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 



12 



plete dedication of ourselves may be able 
to choose intelligently which of the 
Communities wil offer us the greatest 
scope for our efforts to obey our Lord. 

The first section of this summary sets 
out to explain the Religious Life. The 
Gospel's authorisation for this life is 
recorded, together with an explanation 
of how the ideal has been put into 
practice in the ACTIVE life of works 
of mercy, the CONTEMPLATIVE life 
concentrating wholly upon the worship 
of God, and the MIXED life which 
combines both ideals without concentrat- 
ing exclusively upon either. There 
follows a consideration of the qualifica- 
tions for the Religious Life, with advice 
to those who feel themselves attracted 
to it. We have a summary of what most 
Communities have in common in their 
way of life, and a brief history of mon- 
asticism, especially as it concerns our 
own Communion. Then comes an ac- 
count of the value this life has had for 
the Church, together with the Canon 
passed by the General Convention of the 
Church in this country in 1913, relating 
to Religious Communities. 

Part II consists of statements con- 
tributed by the authorities of each 
Community in the United States and 
in Canada, outlining the Rule of each, 
what they do, and where they work. 
For men there are three active Com- 
munities, one contemplative, and five 
professing the mixed life. For women 
there are four active Communities, one 
contemplative, and ten mixed. Mission 
work is maintained in Liberia, China, 
and the Philippine Islands. In all 
some eighty-three houses are maintained 
for religious work in the United States 
and Canada and foreign Missionary 
Districts under the jurisdiction of the 
Church in the two countries. Some of 
the Orders have ties with those in Eng- 
land and other parts of the Anglican 
Communion. To the book there is 
appended a glossary of technical terms 
used in Religious Communities. 

The factual information given is ex- 
cellent, though there have been a few 



new developments in the past two 
years. But the book has one defect. If 
one has no interest in the Religious 
Orders, the presentation of the life is 
not calculated to stimulate it. There is 
no real effort made to depicit the real 
satisfactions of life in such a Commun- 
ity. For that we must turn to other 
materials. But because of their part in 
advancing the work of our Church, the 
defect may be pardoned. Of special 
interest to local readers in the one 
Contemplative Communty for men, the 
Order of the Good Shepherd, founded 
some four years ago by Father Peeples 
at Marion, N. C, while he was Rector 
of that Parish. 



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LAWRENCEVILLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
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in the following fields: Business Ad- 
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tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



13 



THE COMMIT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEV1LLE, N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how- 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis GarTett Conant 
Headmaster 




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Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



Should we take our children to the 
Church services? 

Years ago, Dr. McGregor, who was 
for many years our National Director 
of Christian Education, wrote the 
following paragraphs which I consider 
a good answer to this question: 

"I want to plead for a religious educa- 
tion that will make its very first step 
the restoration of the worship of the 
Church to the children of the Church. 
You have exiled the children of the 
Church from their Father's House to 
learn lessons about God instead of bring- 
ing them face to face with God in His 
holy sanctuary. You have given them 
lessons about the Church, its history, 
its doctrine and its symbols and you 
have excluded them from the rich, warm 
fellowship of the Family -to which they 
belong. 

" 'But, 1 many will reply to me, 'the 
children will not understand the ser- 
vices and the sermons.' To these my 
answer is three-fold. First, they will 
understand far more than you think. 
And understanding is not the primary 
factor in worship anyway. Worship in- 
cludes feeling and will. And children 
are not deficient in these abilities. 
Second, worship is the Church's best 



WHAT IS STEWARDSHIP? 

Christian Stewardship is the practice 
of systematic and proportionate giving 
of time, abilities and material posses- 
sions, based on the conviction that these 
are a trust from God to be used in His 
service for the benefit of all mankind. 



14 



educator. We all learn far more from 
teh hymns we sing and the prayers we 
say than from all the lessons we ever 
taught or from all the sermons we ever 
heard. Third, if the services and the 
sermons are not understood by the 
children we had better change them for 
they are probably not understood by the 
adults either." 

I do not agree fully with Dr. Mc- 
Gregor's third point, but I do feel that 
the Church's services, properly rendered, 
provide a type of discipline, dignity, 
awe. and reverence that cannot be 
duplicated elsewhere. One reason we 
learn more from hymns and prayers 
than we do from lessons and sermons is, 
we sing and say them over and over 
again. Then too, they are more direct- 
ly addressed to God. 



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15 



FORTH INCREASES 
SUBSCRIPTION RATE 

Beginning September 1, Forth, the 
Church's official magazine, with consid- 
erable reluctance, increased its sub- 
scription rate from $1.00 to $1.25. With 
printing and paper costs touching new 
ceilings overnight, the wonder is that 
Forth held out as long as it did. Cer- 
tainly no apology is necessary. See 
what you get on the newstand for a 
similar price, and Forth readers will 
convince themselves easily that they are 
getting a big $1.25 worth . . . more for 
the money than in most of the things 
they buy. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



Churchman 




•$ 



ISSUE 



The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 



VOL. XVIII 



NOVEMBER, 1947 



NO. 8 




•/:.-— -: .__. 



Saint Luke's Church, Lincolnton, one of the oldest 
Parishes in the Diocese 



(Etfttrrtfman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Salaries and Stipends 

This is an editorial which we wish 
some layman might have felt impelled 
to write. We wish so because it deals 
with the matter of clergy salaries and 
missionary stipends lay and clerical. It 
will always look like special pleading as 
long as the clergy themselves have to 
write editorials dealing with money mat- 
ters. 

Elsewhere in this issue a news article 
reveals the findings of the Church Pen- 
sion Fund relative to clergy salaries. 
According to this report, about one half 
of the clergy have stipends including 
rectory allowances, of less than $3,000. 
This report strikes very close home, for 
Western North Carolina's clergy are al- 
most all included in this lower bracket. 
The 1947 Journal lists only four parishes 
out of IK parishes and aided parishes 
that pay in excess of $3,000. We will 
draw the decent mantle of charity over 
the amounts paid by mission churches, 
saying only that all mission priests in 
the Diocese are included in the lower 
one half of the Pension Fund figures. 



Because the Church Pension Fund 
does not concern itself with stipends 
paid to lay workers, there were no fig- 
ures published that would give the salary 
ratings of these highly important ser- 
vants of the King who are rendering 
Him service in the many mission stations 
of our Diocese. Without exception they 
are all underpaid, and like the clergy, 
the Church is able to hold them because 
of their devotion to their work rather 
than for the material rewards extended. 
The Pension Fund was kind enough to 
say, "Their concern is a spiritual one — 
to serve the Church. To them the ma- 
terial return is secondary, even incident- 
al/' This most certainly applies to out- 
lay workers as well as our priests. 

Right now is the time to lay this whole 
matter seriously to heart. Every vestry, 
every mission committee, indeed every 
congregation and individual churchman 
should study the report that is contained 
in this issue. The Every Member Can- 
vass should stress the fact that we can- 
not hope to continue to pay salaries that 
do not meet the needs of inflationary 
times and keep these men and women. 
For devotion and consecration will break 
down in the face of dire want and debt. 
Unless our parishes and missions face 
this problem realistically, there may be 
a lot of congregations which will soon 
be hearing, 'T am called to a field of 
wider service and it is a challenge which 
I cannot ignore." And that, all too of- 
ten, is just a nice way of saying "I can't 
live on what you are paying." 



The "W A" 

The Highland Churchman is again 
well pleased to be able to devote the 
larger portion of the November issue to 
the Diocesan Woman's Auxiliary. No 
editorial praise is equal to the record 
the Auxiliary makes for itself both in its 
branches and on a diocesan-wide basis. 
The zeal and consecration of our church- 
women speaks through the articles that 
are written and their effectiveness is 
clear to those who will read of the many 
activities that are being carried forward. 



Clergy Salaries 



The average salary of the 5000 clergy in the Episcopal Church is $3,450, accord- 
ing to figures published last month by the Church Pension Fund in its bulletin 
"Protection Point. v This figure includes an amount for rectory allowance. The 
cash stipend overages slightly over $3,000. Most of the men are married, some 
have large families. About one-half of the clergy have stipends, including rectory 
allowances, of less than $3,000. 

Factory Workers Get More 

In contrast with these figures the report shows that railroad engineers draw 
an average of $5,400 a year, conductors $4,900. Skilled factory workers are in a 
$3,000 to $3,500 range and good bookkeepers are paid $2,600 to $3,100. 

The Church Pension Fund report points out that clergymen have invested a 
considerable sum in preparation of their life-work. They are college trained and 
have spent at least three years in a seminary. They are expected to be and are 
leaders in their communities and, far more important, are the spearhead of true 
progress in civilization. 

"Most clergymen are under-compensated," says the bulletin. "The reason is 
clear. Their concern is a spiritual one — to serve the Church. To them the ma- 
terial return is secondary, even incidental." 

Clergy pensions are related to salary and the trustees of the Church Pension 
Fund, as they grant pensions, have been constantly struck with the low level of 
so many clergy salaries. 

A Guide for Vestries 

''Since the Fund has the detailed record of salaries it is felt that this analysis 
of them will supply a needed yardstick to vestries and others who have the respon- 
sibility of arranging for clergy compensation," the report explains. 

The nine charts included in the report show that the average salary of the 
active clergy in 1919 was only $1,900. During the next 12 years it rose steadily 
to $3,100. During the depression it dropped to $2,650. 

Other charts show that married clergymen average $800 more than unmarried 
clergymen. The largest single salary range is under $3,000, including housing 
allowance and the second largest is from $2,000 to $2,500. Some 620 clergymen 
are within the $3,000-$3,500 range, a slightly larger group receive between $3,500 
and $4,000 and 400 receive salaries between $3,500 and $5,000. 



Overseas Relief 

Our Diocesan Convention, the Woman's Auxiliary, and the Young Churchmen 
all have endorsed more active participation in sending old clothes to people overseas 
who are in need. Bundles are being packed here and there in the Diocese. Have 
YOU searched your closets and trunks for clothing to send? Winter is coming. 
Step outside your warm home — feel that chill wind: Read St. Luke 3:11. 

3 



Why Pledge? 

By Presbyter Morgantonensis 



Why should I make a pledge to my parish and for the missionary work of the 
Church: For a great many reasons, some good, and some not so good. Of course 
the parish or mission of which you are a member has to make up its budget for 
the year on the basis of what it learns from your pledge, and that of other members. 
These pledges, added together, tell what the Diocese may expect for its missionary 
work from your congregation, and it makes out its expenses for the coming year 
on the basis of what it learns it may count on from the 18 parishes and 45 missions 
within the Diocese. The National Church makes her plans for the mission fields 
on the basis of what it learns it can expect from her 74 Dioceses and 28 Missionary 
Districts. If I don't pledge I weaken the whole work of the Church, both at home 
and abroad, to a limited but very real extent. Possibly what I might give would 
mean the difference in sending or not sending a clergyman, a teacher, a woman 
worker, or a doctor into China or the Philippines. Or it might mean a clergyman 
or no clergyman to carry on the ministry of the Church in one (and if one then 
usually several others as well) of the forty-five missions in Western North Carolina. 

But most likely, if you do not pledge, others will, the work will drag on in all 
these places instead of going ahead with the forward push that you and the know- 
ledge of your support would have given to it. 

Then there is the necessity of living with yourself. You are a Baptized Chris- 
tian and therefore a member of the Missionary Society. Yet you are willing for 
other people to do your work for you. Your Lord has told you to bear your witness 
to all the world. You don't care enough to take Him seriously. You apparently 
are quite willing that others carry on your fight against atheism, against the world, 
the flesh, and the devil. Others will do it; they'll pay your rector's salary, your 
church's coal and light bill, and even give a little for missions, but they'll wonder 
why their Christ doesn't mean as much to you as He does to them. Both they and 
your God will rather question your sincerity when you come to worship, and you'll 
begin to question it yourself. It's easy then to try to forget this God Who questions 
you, to try to escape Him and His Church, and it's hard to face up to your real 
sorry self. You'll probably show up for services at Christmas and Easter and kid 
yourself you are doing your full part by placing something in the alms basin then. 
But the people begin to greet you a bit too cordially when you come so seldom, 
and you recognize the fact that you're not really one of them. So you just begin 
to stay away from the Church entirely. The Sacraments come therefore to mean 
little or nothing to you as you starve out your weakening soul. 

The only alternative to at least some of this tragedy in your own case is to make 
a pledge both for your local congregation and the Diocesan and world-wide mission 
of the Church this fall when the Every-Member-Convass is held. Giving is one 
of the great Christian privileges and duties. The amount is not important at all 
so long as it is given to the point of sacrifice, on the basis of a prayerful considera- 
tion of what percentage God really wants you to give out of your yearly income. 
What such giving does for you and your eternal soul as you share your Christ with 
a world that needs Him is the all-important thing. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



DIOCESAN PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

The theme of the work of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary for the year is "Ye Shall 
Be Witnesses Unto Me". We can well 
say. "'But isn't that always the purpose 
of the Auxiliary?" Yes. It certainly 
should be. Every meeting, every act of 
the Woman's Auxiliary should be wit- 
nessing to an eager world of our mem- 
bership in Christ and His Church, but 
all of us frequently forget this. In our 
efforts to raise money, in all our busy- 
ness, we forget that all our work is of 
value only if it is to extend the kingdom 
of God. 

As we approach the end of another 
year let us pause long enough to take 
stock of our Auxiliaries, our plans and 
our work, to be sure, as we begin a new 
year that our planning will be with the 
consciousness that it is to further God's 
Kingdom. 

We have a task of Evangelism. First 
to deepen our own devotion to our Lord 
through prayer and worship, and 
through understanding our faith through 
reading and study. Second we need to 
study the needs for evangelism, and the 
methods for accomplishing it. Then 
when we as women of the Church realize 
our precious heritage in Christ, and feel 
the need of the world about us, we must 
with a definite program reach out to 
those women in our communities, in our 
nation and the world, to share with them 
what we have found. 

Our annual meeting in June called on 
us to increase the devotional life of our 
groups through prayer groups, corporate 
communions, and installation services 
for officers. It also recommended that 
a definite plan be made to contact every 
woman in every parish and mission. 

May we go forth during the year with 
a determined effort to bring more per- 
sons to a knowledge of the saving grace 
of Our Lord and Saviour. Jesus Christ. 
Lucy T. Fletcher. 



A MESSAGE FROM THE SECRETARY 
OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

"Ye Shall be Witnesses". Our theme 
for the coming year is embodied in four 
words which are at once an inspiration 
and a command, a duty and a pleasure, 
a privilege and a necessity. We must 
be witnesses of God's great love and 
mercy, if we are to do anything about 
the sick sorrowing world in which we 
live and for which we have such deep 
concern. It is our responsibility, the 
responsibility of each individual and 
each group who has been privileged to 
know God's greatness, to witness to that 
knowledge in our daily living, by daily 
prayer and communion with Him, by 
listening to His wishes for us, His orders 
for us, and by going forth and doing the 
very best we can to make Him really 
known to all who come in contact with 
us. It is not necessary to go around 
preaching, or doing anything which we 
would feel embarassed over, but merely 
(and it really is a big order!) by loving 
God so much that we "show forth" His 
love by loving all people. 

YE SHALL BE WITNESSES is the 
title of a descriptive list of materials for 
adult study groups on timely subjects 
recommended by the National Council. 
The Secretary of Christian Education in 
the Woman's Auxiliary stands ready at 
all times to help any person or group in 
planning programs for study. It is 
hoped that the Diocesan Officers of the 
Woman's Auxiliary will be used more 
and more by the Branches in their work. 
Anne H. K. Jenkins. 



PROVINCIAL MEETING 

At the time of the meeting of the 
Synod of the Province of Sewanee in 
Atlanta, October 14-16, the Provincial 
Meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary was 
held. Our Province includes fifteen 
dioceses in nine southern states. Lovely 
St. Luke's Church was host to the meet- 
ings. The Synod and Auxiliary Meet- 
ing opened Tuesday night with an im- 



5 



pressive service, at which Bishop Car- 
ruthers of South Carolina was the 
preacher. Corporate Communion was 
celebrated at All Saints' Church on 
Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 
after which breakfast was served to all 
delegates in the parish house of All 
Saints' Church. 

Perhaps the outstanding speaker of 
the meeting was young Mr. Zabriskie of 
Virginia, who spoke on the World Con- 
ference of Christian Youth in Oslo, 
Norway, in August. Other speakers 
were: Bishop J. E. Hines, Coadjutor of 
Texas; Mr. Robert Fletcher, missionary 
to the deaf of the Province; and our 
own Mr. Rufus Morgan, who spoke on 
the work at Cherokee. 

Mrs. John A. Morson of Mississippi 
was elected president of the Auxiliary in 
the Province, to take office in 1948. 

Perhaps the most helpful part of the 
program were three workshops held on 
Devotional Life in the Parish; Person- 
nel, recruiting women for church work; 
and Leadership Training. Women from 
our diocese were in each of these sec- 
tions. 

Wednesday night the Provincial Ban- 
quet was held at which Mr. Robert 
Cook of the National Council Depart- 
ment of Promotion spoke on "Radio and 
the Church". 

Women who represented our diocese 
were your president, Miss Fletcher; 
Mrs. Wiese, United Thank Offering 
Treasurer; Mrs. Alice Maxwell, Direc- 
tor of the Fifth District; Mrs. Cecil Hos- 
kins, Devotional Chariman; and Mrs. 
T. O. Wright, Director of the First Dis- 
trict. Mrs. Maxwell served on the Cour- 
tesy committee. 

The Synod and Provincial Meeting 
give information arid inspiration, as well 
as increasing our fellowship and sense 
of oneness in our work for Our Lord. 



A LETTER FROM OUR SUPPLY 

SECRETARY, MRS. ROGER 

WINBORNE 

Dear Auxiliary Members: 

'You have already received your allot- 
ments for the Advent boxes. This year 
the Mission lists are a great deal larger' 
than usual. W T e also have an increase 



from £60.00 to £100.00 for the Discre- 
tionary Fund of the National Supply 
Secretary on behalf of Missions over- 
seas, and to meet special emergencies 
at home. Our Christmas check to retir- 
ed missionaries and the widows of mis- 
sionaries will be £45.00. There will also 
be a check of £20.00 sent to Miss Wag- 
ner at St. Paul's Mission, Amherst, Vir- 
ginia, with which to purchase dispensary 
and medical supplies for the mission. 
We are all especially interested in this 
as our Supply boxes are to be sent there. 
To quote Miss Stabler, our National 
Supply Secretary: "It is going to take 
a great deal of enthusiastic interest 
among our women to enable us to pro- 
vide for the great needs which have 
been made known to me." The Wom- 
an's Auxiliary of our Diocese has always 
been most generous in filling their sup- 
ply boxes. I trust each branch will fill 
its EXTRA QUOTA this year with a 
feeling of thankfulness for the abun- 
dance with which they have been bless- 
ed, and a willingness to give to those 
less fortunate. 

Sincerely Yours, 

Mrs.. Roger Winborne. 



A MESSAGE FROM THE DEVOTION- 
AL CHAIRMAN, MRS. CECIL 
HOSKINS 

Devotions have always held a place 
of utmost importance in our Auxiliary. 
In the years ahead let us give more time 
and thought to our devotions. 

There is no end to what church wom- 
en can accomplish with God's love and 
guidance gained through prayer and the 
strength and inspiration received from 
the Holy Communion. 

This year it is hoped each branch will 
form Prayer Groups to meet once a 
month to pray for some pressing need. 
In addition to the Prayer Group, have 
a corporate communion once each 
month. When these two wonderful 
meetings with- God are realized it will be 
a great day for our Diocese, and a great 
step forward toward building a more 
Christian world. May each member of 
the Auxiliary feel her responsibility and 
do her share to make this a reality. 



CHRISTIAN SOCIAL RELATIONS 

Mrs. George W. Fletcher, Chairman 

As chairman of Christian Social Re- 
lations, I feel that there is a great need 
for this type of work to be carried on 
extensively through the Church. 

The Woman's Auxiliary is one branch 
of the Church which should give Chris- 
tian Social Relations serious thought, 
and exert much effort to reach people 
who are underprivileged. By under- 
privileged I mean those people who are 
ill, or are lacking in means or oppor- 
tunity, or too old to reach the Church, 
or those who are not blessed with the 
spiritual need of coming in contact with 
the church or church people. 

I sincerely hope that the women of 
the Auxiliary will be inspired to put 
forth every effort to make this a suc- 
cessful year in bringing the church closer 
to those who are less fortunate than 
they. 

The following letter from Sister Heth- 
erington tells of one Auxiliary of less 
than a dozen active members: 

"Through the efforts of members of 
the Auxiliary cooperating with other 
persons in the community, and strength- 
ened and guided by the Holy Spirit we 
have organized and started the develop- 
ment of the Cub Scout, Brownie Scout, 
and Senior Girl Scout programs in Mur- 
phy, and have continued active work 
with both white and colored intermed- 
iate girl scouts. 

During the summer months we held 
swimming classes for more than sixty 
children from this community and from 
Hiwassee Dam. 

• We were also privileged to assist with 
the religious instruction of some two 
hundred boys and girls at a non-denomi- 
national Bible Conference for rural 
children. 

]■:.. We have started and continued the 
supervision of a Sunday School for the 



Xegro children of the Will Scott Moun- 
tain community in Murphy. 

We co-operated with the Valle Crucis 
Training School and other local people 
in conducting two inter-denominational 
Vacation Bible Schools, one for white 
and one for colored, and have taken 
part in regular weekly inter-denomina- 
tional Bible Study classes. 

We hope by God's help to become 
clearer and more effective channels for 
His Grace, and we glory in any part we 
may have in the coming of His King- 
dom." 



THE UNITED THANK OFFERING 

The United Thank Offering of the 
women of our Church gives us a won- 
derful and inspirational way of showing 
our thankfulness to God for the many 
blessings bestowed upon us. To make 
daily use of our Blue Boxes, saying a 
prayer as we drop in a coin, brings us 
into closer fellowship with our Lord and 
deepens our spiritual lives. It not only 
helps those who give but also makes pos- 
sible the advancement of the Kingdom 
of God. Women workers are sent to 
domestic and foreign mission fields; 
Churches, hospitals, and other build- 
ings are constructed; and supplies and 
needed equipment are sent to mission- 
aries for their use. Our gifts which God 
blesses gives us a personal interest in 
our Church and its work of which we 
can consider ourselves a part. 

Mrs. George Weise, 
Treasurer, U. T. 0. 



Here's what the Auxiliary of Mur- 
phy, with eight active members is do- 
ing: Entertained all new teachers .of 
the schools at a picnic supper; started 
and continues a parish supper one night 
a month; sent three bundles of clothing 
to the Church World Service center.; 
furnishes two Den Mothers for Cub 
Scout Dens, and attends to all routine 
Auxiliary work. 



Missions and Church Extension 



October 10, 1947 
Dear Branch President: 

Fall is here again and I trust it finds 
us all with renewed energy and enthu- 
siasm for the work of the Church, God's 
work, throughout the world. Our theme 
this year is "Ye shall be witnesses." Be- 
ginning with our own homes and par- 
ishes, on into the wide field of the whole 
earth, we shall witness to our faith in 
the life of Christ by our own lives. 

With this world being even sicker this 
year than last, we feel convinced as nev- 
er before that the one certain cure for 
all its ills is in the principles of Chris- 
tianity, and it is squarely up to us as 
Christians to put these principles into 
practice. 

Let us inform ourselves about the 
work of the Church; what it is doing in 
different lands, and how we can help to 
make that work more effective. Let me 
suggest, by way of stimulating interest 
in Missions, that you have a luncheon 
or supper meeting. Have the members 
bring sandwiches, the hostess serve 
something to drink. Designate two or 
three members to give sketches (not 
written) of the work in some of our 
Mission fields, either at home or abroad. 
It would be even better if you could get 
a church worker or returned missionary 
to speak to you. The response to our 
call for contributions to the Missions in 
our Diocese has been gratifying, many 
parishes and some missions, themselves, 
contributing material and money. There 
is still time for more. 

I am enclosing extracts from two let- 
ters of our farthest north missionary in 
Alaska, the Rev. William Gordon, which 
I believe you will find interesting. 

Word has come that Western North 
Carolina was among the first of the 
diocesses to over-subscribe its quota to 
the Presiding Bishop's Fund for World 



Relief. Let us equal that fine record in 
the coming year. 

Mr. Fisher, our missionary to the 
deaf, writes interestingly of his work in 
the Province. He was very gratified 
and was enabled to do a great deal of 
good with the $199 given him for his dis- 
cretionary fund. His urgent need, how- 
ever, is for a car to get about to his dif- 
ferent missions and isolated people. Mr. 
Morgan reports a very successful sum- 
mer at Valle Crucis at the Training 
School for Church Workers, and tells of 
the Bible Schools and Missions conduct- 
ed by these workers. 

They have not yet started work on 
the church for the Indians at Cherokee. 
The estimates received have all been 
double the $20,000 given from the Unit- 
ed Thank Offering. So for the present 
they must wait; wait for prices to go 
down or for more gifts or modification of 
the plans, if necessary. 

After reading this I am sure you will 
realize there is plenty of work for us 
women of the Auxiliary to do, and no 
time at all for stalling or idling. But 
work done for the Master is more satis- 
fying and rewarding than all else. 

So let me close by wishing you all the 
best year of your life in the Auxiliary. 

Sincerely, 

Isabel B. Patton, 
Chairman of Missions 
and Church Ext. 



Bat Cave women have been busy all 
summer and fall making dressings for 
the Valley Clinic, and are studying for 
the year "Exploring the Prayer Book 
and Hymnal". 



The Rutherfordton chapter has been 
busy as bees raising money by means of 
a rummage sale, supper on the lawn of 
the rectory, and a bazaar. 



8 



Trinity, Asheville, gave two benefit 
parties during the summer, in the form 
of Dessert Bridge parties. They raised 
money for the Coffee Hour which is held 
after the eleven o'clock service each 
Sunday, and to buy a mimeograph ma- 
chine for the Church office. They sent 
large amounts of clothing overseas, and 
are now at work on their annual bazaar. 



The Auxiliary at Hickory seems to be 
humming with activity under the lead- 
ership of the new rector, the Rev. Rob- 
ert Campbell. Several new members 
have joined the branch, helping with 
the jobs of redecorating the rectory, and 
raising money to get the church organ 
in condition. A reception was held in 
September introducing the new rector 
and his wife to the town. 

A nursery has been started, with 
members of the Y.P.S.L. assisting with 
the children during the church service. 



Grace Church-in-the-Mountains spon- 
sored their Annual Musicale in August, 
having local and visiting artists on the 
program. 



The women of All Souls' Parish meet 
the first Monday afternoon of every 
month. They make layettes for the 
Welfare Department, and have speakers 
for their Tea Hour meeting. In August 
they had a church festival in co-opera- 
tion with the Overseas committee, rais- 
ing $940, besides all the wonderful 
clothing brought by the people attend- 
ing. 



Packing a dozen boxes of clothes and 
gifts for needy children in Europe is 
keeping the women of St. Philip's, Bre- 
vard, busy. They are also studying, in 
collaboration with all the other churches 
in Brevard "People of the United Na- 
tions". 



The Chapter at Saluda has been busy 
all summer earning money to pay for 
many repairs to their church, and send- 
ing boxes to Germany. They are ex- 
cited now over plans to start a Com- 
munity Center in a building owned by 
the church. 



There's nothing lazy or indifferent 
about the women at Calvary Church, 
Fletcher. During August they served a 
church supper to the public, making 
over three hundred dollars. An inter- 
esting venture underway there now, is 
based on the parable of the talents. 
Each member of the church family has 
been given two envelopes. Envelope 
No. 1, containing five dollars from the 
church treasury, is marked with the 
name of the recipient, and is to be in- 
vested in any activity that will make 
it grow ten-fold toward a new parish 
house. This increase is to be put in en- 
velope No. 2, and returned to the church. 



The branch at Tryon has sent boxes 
of clothing overseas, and is busy sewing 
for St. Luke's Hospital at Tryon. 



St. Cyprians' has been studying 
"Ways and Teachings of the Church" 
at their regular meetings. They have a 
most active group of young people who 
are helping with many of the regular 
parish responsibilities. 



It's amazing what interested women 
can find to do to help! At St. Paul's, 
Edneyville, the women have been can- 
ning apple sauce for the Thompson 
Orphanage, and are buying 100 Prayer 
Books for the church. 



An interesting activity of the Grace 
Church, Asheville, group is the getting 
together of the Communion Service for 
the new chapel at the Indian Reserva- 
tion. To date they have the chalice and 
paten, the wafer box, and a silver bowl 
which belonged to Miss Kimberly. They 
plan on having a leather case made for 
the complete service, so that Mr. Mor- 
gan can carry the service with him. They 
give books and magazines to the Book- 
mobile in Asheville, and have assisted 
materially toward the Trinity Church 
rectory. This group has only seven 
members ! 




Bishop John B. Bentley, Missionary Bishop of the Episcopal Dis- 
trict of Alaska, inspects the "Godspeed," built at Seattle under 
supervision of Norman Blanchard, Jr., (left). The 35-foot craft 
is designed for river and shallow water navigation, and will be used 
to carry spiritual ministry to thousands of Indians and whites who 
live along the waterways beyond the Arctic Circle. The Bishop 
has spent 27 years in Alaska, and on January 1, 1948, will become 
vice-president of the Episcopal National Council and Director of 
its Overseas Department, at Church headquarters in New York City. 



RESOLUTION ON RESIGNATION OF 
BISHOP GRIBBIN 

WHEREAS, the Executive Board of 
the Woman's Auxiliary is advised of the 
tendered resignation of our beloved 
Bishop, the Right Reverend Robert 
Emmet Gribbin, D. D., NOW THERE- 
FORE, be it 

RESOLVED, that the Executive Board 
of the Woman's Auxiliary for itself and 
on. behalf of all of the Women of the 
Church in Western North Carolina, 
hereby expresses its profound regret that 
Our Bishop finds it necessary, due to the 
condition of his health, to retire as Bish- 
op, and our deep gratitude to almighty 



Cod for the high privilege of having had 
the inspired leadership of this true 
Christian Man and 

RESOLVED further, that we extend 
to the Bishop and Mrs. Gribbin our love 
and hope for a life of continuing service 
and happiness. 

Adopted this 25th day of Septem- 
ber, 1947. ... ... . 

Lucy T. Fletcher, President 
1 Jessie Huff,- Secretary ■'■"■ 

The Executive - Board of the ;W;o man's 
Auxiliary in the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the U. S. A. .;.': . ..; 



1.0 



Youth News 

Bv Helen Thomas 



The All Youth Convention of the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina met 
at Grace Church, Morganton, October 
3, 4, with 115 attending the opening 
banquet and exercises. The group was 
welcomed to Morganton by Miss Mary 
Aston Leavell, President of the local 
group, and a response was made by Miss 
Helen Thomas, President of the Dioces- 
an Youth. Following roll call by Miss 
Betsy Barber, Diocesan Secretary, Miss 
Thomas introduced Mr. Gus Travis, 
humorist and writer for the Charlotte 
Observer, who spoke on his experiences 
in the newspaper business. The young 
people of Grace Church presented a 
number of skits while the room was 
being cleared for dancing and also for 
the movie of Patterson Schoool, which 
was shown later in the evening. The 
Rev. Boston Lackey, Jr., held a short 
preparation service in the church. 

On Saturday morning, October 4, the 
entire conference attended the Holy 
Communion service and the breakfast 
which followed. The committees which 
had been appointed by the president met 
after breakfast to get their work done. 
The committees and their chairmen are 
as follows: Resolution, Andy Weaver; 
Courtesy, Ann Waldrop; Nominating, 
Francie Lyman. 

The business session was called to 
order at 10:00 A. M. by the president, 
Helen Thomas. Reports were given by 
each group present on the work they 
have done this year. '.The Constitution 
and By-Laws of the Young Churchmen 
were ratified. A number of changes 
were made. 

The committees.: were called on to 
make their report: The . following are 
the Resolutions that were passed. ' 

fie it resolved that, the young people' 
of .■.the diocese undertake to. send relief 
in the way of food and clothing to the. 
peoples of Europe/. .:.:;.' 

fie it resolved, that .-work among the 
colored young people 'be further- increas- 



ed and extended. 

Be it resolved that the young people 
of the diocese of W. N. C. extend to 
Bishop Gribbin on his retirement, their 
thanks for the interest which he has 
shown in the work of the youth of the 
diocese. 

It was moved, seconded and passed 
that the resolution to Bishop Gribbin 
be rewritten and a copy sent to him. 

The Courtesy committee extended 
thanks to the young people of Grace 
Chuch, and to the Auxiliary of Grace 
Church for their kind hospitality, and 
suggested that each one write a note of 
thanks to his host or hostess upon their 
arrival home. Thanks were extended to 
Helen Thomas for her untiring work 
and devotion with the young people 
during her term as president. 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins, Chairman 
of the Youth Commission, gave report 
of same. 

The Nominating Committee present- 
ed the following report: 

President, Mary Aston Leavell, Mor- 
ganton, N. C; Vice President, Andy 
Weaver, Trinity Church, Asheville; 
Secretary, Willodene Hook, Bessemer 
City, N. C; Youth News Reporter, 
Helen Thomas. 

Nominations were made from the 
floor, and each office was voted on sep- 
arately, one vote allowed to each league 
represented. The people suggested by 
the nominating committee were elected. 

The Rev. A. Rufus Morgan had pray- 
ers for missions at noon. The Rev. Rob- 
ert Campbell, Church of the Ascension, 
Hickory, N. C, a newcomer to the dio- 
cese from Cleveland, Ohio, spoke on 
Plan, and its major emphasis for 1947- 
48. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned for. lunch, at which 
time the courtesy committee report was 
read. The meeting was closed with the 
benediction given by the Rev. Boston 
Lackey, Sr. 



11: 



NOTICE 

Will anyone having any news of their 
young people's groups please send it to 
Miss Helen Thomas, Trinity Church, 
Asheville, N. C. 



WORLD RELIEF 

Mr. Redwood reports that up to the 
time of the November issue deadline 
#4,971.54 has been received for the Pre- 
siding Bishop's Fund for World Relief. 



CLERICAL CHANGE 

The Rev. Joseph S. Huske has resign- 
ed as rector of St. Luke's, Lincolnton, 
and is now assistant to the Dean at 
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans, 
La. 



Grace Church, Morganton, entertain- 
ed the Young Churchmen during Octo- 
ber, housing and feeding the sixty-odd 
who were present. It was thrilling to 
see that many young people together, 
and interesting to speculate on the won- 
ders that could be accomplished with 
that many shoulders to the wheel. 



Many of the branches are using speak- 
ers suggested by the Promotion Chair- 
man. Are you? If not, try them! 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

At KANUGA CONFERENCES 

June 1st to September 1st 

Religious Books Ecclesiastical Arts 

Church School Supplies 

Owned and Operated by 

Kanuga Conference, Hendersonville, N. C. 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



Book Review 

By The Rev. J. H. Rhys 



DANGERS IN MODERN SOCIE- 
TY, a review of "The Abolition of Man" 
by C. S. Lewis. (Macmillan Company 
$1.25) 

Modern education, one hears it on 
every hand, is at war with the Christian 
way of life. Our differences of opinion 
in religion caused us to establish educa- 
tion on a non-sectarian basis. From 
that it naturally develops into secular- 
ism. In other words, our educational 
system no longer takes any account of 
God. He is left out of all instruction or 
consideration. And that means a com- 
pletely effective denial of God in the life 
of the student. The results, on half- 
formed minds, can readily be predicted. 
Father Simcox finds the secularist atti- 
tude most developed among the college 
teachers of such subjects as psychology 
and sociology. Professor Lewis traces 
the genesis of this attitude back to the 
teaching of English in schools. That is 
to say that our contemporary education- 
al process is at work undermining Chris- 
tion principles from the time that its 
victims are able to think. 

Mr. Lewis proves his point as follows. 
One textbook in English equates the 
statement, "This waterfall is sublime" 
with "I have sublime feelings". At once 
we are left with a radical subjectivism 
which, among other things, would set 
aside the objective character of patriot- 
ism, morality, and religion. Another 
text states that a piece of really poor 
writing about the history of Australia is 
bad simply because it attributes to hors- 
es motives which no animal could en- 
tertain; thus one may conclude that it 
is illogical to treat one's animals as in 
any sense one's companions, which 
would make us less likely to be concern- 
ed for their welfare. And so it goes. 
The possibility of any sentiment being 
reasonable, or even unreasonable, is ex- 
cluded by the reduction of all sentiments 
to emotions which can have no relation 
to reason. The end of subjectivism is 



12 



attained when you can no longer com- 
plete a sentence with any predicate of 
value; you can only talk about yourself. 
The products of the system Mr. Lewis 
calls "men without chests", the sort of 
men who are the reason that our civili- 
zation is lacking in dynamic qualities. 

Once objective values are denied, 
there arises the question of how any 
obligation can be laid upon anyone. 
Why should we labour to preserve so- 
ciety? Or why should we obey our in- 
stincts? The only possible reasons for 
any type of obligation have to be bor- 
rowed from the traditional sense of 
values, which Mr. Lewis has described 
as "the Tao" (from the Chinese for Wav 
of Life). 

Of course modern education has in- 
sisted that it looks toward the progres- 
sive emancipation of the human race, 
through scientific achievement. But 
emancipation from what? Mr. Lewis 
points out that these inventions are con- 
trolled by certain groups of people, and 
really give them power over other 
groups. "Each new power won BY 
man is a power OVER man as well." 
When man's conquest of nature comes 
to include the conquest of HUMAN 
nature, it will mean the power of man 
to make himself what he pleases, or 
really the power of some men to make 
other men what THEY please. This 
raises the terrible possibility that an all- 
competent state, or those who control 
it, by the combination of eugenics and 
educational psychology could completely 
condition the lives of all future gen- 
erations of men. This would indeed be 
the abolition of man as man; we would 
stand on the same level as the insect 
world. Our world has seen enough to 
know that it is not pure fantasy. 

It would be best to read the account 
in full. And do not forget the appen- 
dix of Mr. Lewis' illustrations of the 
Tao. The time may not be so far off 
when we shall have to choose between 
the classical morality or judgement of 
values, and the abolition of man in the 
completely conditioned mind and life 
and emotions to which present tenden- 
cies in our civilization may lead. 



St. Mary's, Beaver Creek, is active 
too. They send magazines to the hos- 
pitals, help financially with various caus- 
es, and are making money to enclose 
the church yard. 



One of the regular activities of the 
Church of the Redeemer, Asheville, is 
the serving of breakfast to the congre- 
gation every Sunday following the cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion. They 
care for the church and parish house, 
and have contributed a generous sum 
toward the building fund, which will 
make living quarters for their priest. 



Selling flower plants and woven arti- 
cles, made by themselves, keep the wom- 
en at St. Luke's, Boone, busy, along with 
all their other Auxiliary activities. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



STUDIOS OF 



24515ROSDWAY-PSTGRSOn Q.J. 
H rOUUDCO>lS.9G » 

CHURCH meffiORIALS 

STAIDGD GLASS -WOOD'mCTAL 

ALL CHURCH CRAFTS 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



13 



THE COMMIT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis Garrett Conant 
Headmaster 




Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

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Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

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18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



A MACHINE GUN SPEAKING 

"I'm as tolerant as they make 'em. 

"I never gave a hoot whether the lads 
I mowed down were Catholics, Protest- 
ants or Jews. I never was the least bit 
fussy about the shade of the skin I 
sprayed. 

"To me, all men are equal — equally 
brave, equally foolish, equally doomed. 

"It really kills me how — even after 
all that you folks have just gone through 
— some of you still can sneer, snarl. 
giggle or growl at the color or creed or 
birthplace of someone who is not exactly 
like you. 

"That 'race' baloney, of course, is 
cheap, easy stuff to dish out. Gets you 
action, too. 

"It needles different groups into dis- 
criminating against each other, hating 
each other, lining up against each other 
for advantage. Then fighting each other 
for power. They'll do it every time. 

"And that's where I come in — again — 
laughing at all of you, in short bursts. 

"Can I count on you: Are you going 
to keep up this moron's game of preju- 
dice peddling? Or are you going to 
swear off it — have no patience with it? 

"It's up to you." 



THANKSGIVING 

By Mark Jenkins 

It is November, but there is still a 
riot of color and' beauty in our moun- 
tains and valleys. Even our flower box- 
es, long since neglected, show a blossom 
of pastel hues now and then. "0 Heav- 
enly Father, Who hast filled the world 
with beauty; open, we beseech Thee, our 
eyes to behold Thy gracious Hand in all 
Thy works.'' So runs the prayer for 
joy in and thanksgiving for the beauty 
of God's creation. Stop, when you read 
this, and honestly review your prayers 
of recent days. Has there been any 
word of thanks or appreciation to God 



A4 



for all the beauties of leaf, of blossom, 
of mountainside or awful sunsets? God 
was not compelled to give us such beau- 
ty. Neither is He bound to bless us, in 
any way, because we deserve such boun- 
ty. Xo; too many of us have not even 
said a word of thanks for such Love, yet 
true prayers of thanksgiving are among 
the soul's noblest works. 

I am afraid too many of our prayers 
these days are frantic, negative winnings 
for help or escape. Instead of this, sit 
down before November 27th and make 
as complete a list as possible of all the 
things for which you can be thankful. 
Then list all the blessings which you 
have the simple faith to believe will 
come in the future. 

If you do a thorough job of such a 
listing of blessings, your list will never 
end. But you should have written down 
enough items to direct your prayers, 
your thoughts, and your activities on 
Thanksgiving Day. Make that the be- 
ginning of a life unfeignedly thankful 
not alone in words but in His service. 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 




TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 







$%s 





mmmmmm 

I LVJ .'O- 1 1 L XxXJ 1 \ / 3 Y R A GUS'E • N ■ Y ■ + Si 

■TVTl HIGHEST • SKILLED • CRAFTSMANSHIP pf^"4 



m i n twin Vjf Hifn tSiffni p f i W *fl 



The Rrttersoft School 
TorlSo^/x, 



Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. 'Viese, Supt . 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



IS 



Bishop Gribbin has requested the 
President of the Standing Committee of 
the Diocese, the Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Fletcher, N. C, to arrange the schedule 
of all his visits in the Diocese for Con- 
firmation, between November 23 and 
December 14, inclusive. If you wish 
Bishop Gribbin to visit your Parish or 
Mission between these dates, or if you 
wish a Confirmation Service at some 
other date, please get in touch with Mr. 
Jenkins as soon as possible, and he will 
try to arrange a date to accommodate 
your need. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh. N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Rel igious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



t3MJtgManfc 
Cgttrdpian 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



DECEMBER, 1947 



NO. 9 



Lord Jesus Christ, Who hast promised to 
Thy Church Thine own abiding Presence and the 
guidance of the Holy Spirit; we beseech Thee so 
to guide and govern the minds and hearts of Thy 
servants, the clergy and laity of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina, that they may wisely 
choose a Bishop and leader for Thy Church: that 
so we may go stedfastly forward in the fulfillment 
of Thy great purpose for mankind; we ask it in 
Thy Name, our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. 
Amen. 



(Etjurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Cruris. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D., Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mer. 



Christmas 

Opportunists will seize upon Christ- 
mas this year just as they have done 
from time immemorial. There will be 
the commercial opportunists who will 
exploit the symbolism of the gifts of the 
Magi by presenting for our delection a 
wide variety of gifts from teddy-bears 
to chinchilla coats. There will be the 
humanitarian opportunists who will use 
the universal feeling of fellowship which 
prevails at Christmastime to urge us, suc- 
cessfully, to help the needy of the world. 
And then, it is to be devoutly hoped, 
there will be the fully Christian oppor- 
tunists who will take the best of the 
things the commercial and humanitarian 
opportunists have to offer and add to 
them the tremendous message that we 
are celebrating the anniversary of God's 
physical entry into the world. 

Although we may become impatient 
with the sometimes crass, high-pressure 
methods of the first kind of opportun- 
ists, it must be admitted that they do 
us a real service in emphasizing of idea 
of gifts at Christmas. Gifts serve to 
remind us of the gift God gave us in 
sending his Son into the world. And 



those who emphasize human need at 
Christmas do us no disservice with the 
reminder that Jesus Christ came to min- 
ister to all human need, physical and 
spiritual. 

It is the Christian opportunist, how- 
ever, who will render the greatest service 
when he tells a weary, fear-ridden world 
that He who came to bring peace to 
those who are far off and those who are 
nigh was indeed God Himself and that 
He has not left His people. It is upon 
this eternal message of Christmas that 
men will build a world of enduring peace 
which will be ante-type of the Kingdom 
of God. 



The Election of A Bishop 

The choice of a bishop for the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina places upon 
all of us a responsibility so overwhelm- 
ing as to seem beyond our power to 
handle. It is. The choice cannot be ours 
to make, it must be God's choice; that 
choice will be made by God, acting 
through his instruments who will be the 
clergy and laity of the Diocese. If we 
are ever conscious of God acting, 
through the power of the Holy Ghost, 
there will be no place in our delibera- 
tions for prejudice, ecclesiastical wire- 
pulling or failure to take into considera- 
tion all the needs of the Diocese. 

The Highland Churchman does not 
presume to know all the qualities that 
should be looked for in the men who are 
to be considered, but as it is sound edi- 
torial policy to state the obvious, we dare 
mention a few. We do this in the hope 
that it will make us all think of how the 
list of qualities should be expanded. Our 
bishop should be of great spiritual depth, 
sound scholarship, missionary zeal and 
forceful and winning personality. And 
because every diocese looks for a para- 
gon, we should like to see the diocesan 
possess executive ability, be a good 
preacher, and have a constitution that 
is robust. 

On the cover is printed the prayer 
that has been authorized by the Stand- 
ing Committee to be used throughout 
the Diocese until a successor to the 



Right Reverend Robert Emmet Gribbin 
is elected. It has been written large 
with the earnest hope that every person 
in the Diocese will use it every day. 



To the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese 
of Western North Carolina: 

In leaving the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina, I want you to know 
that I am carrying with me many happy 
memories — memories of services in 
which we have worshipped together, and 
memories of the gracious hospitality en- 
joyed by me in your homes. 

I wish in this way to acknowledge 
with appreciation the cooperation of 
those who helped me to do the work 
committed unto me. 

May you go from strength to strength 
working with your new Diocesan. 
Gratefully, your friend 

Robert E. Gribbin 



Layman's Group Has Meeting 

Initial steps leading towards a dioces- 
an-wide layman's organization were tak- 
en at a meeting held at Trinity Church, 
Asheville, on November 8th. The meet- 
ing was held at the request of Bishop 
Gribbin in order to put in effect a reso- 
lution passed at the Diocesan Conven- 
tion in 1947. This resolution called for 
the formation of a group of laymen who 
would create their own organization and 
initiate and carry out their own program 
for the laymen of the Diocese. Laymen 
from seven churches met in the parish 
house for a supper which was served by 
the ladies of Trinity Church. 

The chairman of the Department of 
Promotion, The Rev. John Tuton, called 
the meeting to order and introduced the 
Bishop who addressed the meeting. The 
Bishop reviewed the case for a vital lay- 
man's work, citing the example of the 
early Church when it was the laity who 
bore witness for Christ in the time of 
persecution following St. Stephen's mar- 
tyrdom. He reminded the men that the 
Church of today stands in need of lay- 
men's work and thought if the Church- 
wide program of evangelism is to suc- 
ceed. The Bishop called upon the lay- 
men to form a body of Churchmen who 




The Rt. Rev. Robert E. Gribbin 

would encourage his successor and stand 
ready to help in the task that will lie 
before the Diocese and its new bishop. 

Following the Bishop's address, a 
chairman pro tern was elected, Mr. John 
Haven from Asheville. The chairman 
led a round table discussion concerning 
the immediate plans for getting the work 
under way. It was agreed that the 
diocesan laymen's work should act as 
(Continued on Page 16) 



3 



Special Convention To Be Held January 14th 



Notices have been sent to all clergy- 
men, vestries and mission committees 
that a special convention has been called 
for Wednesday, January 14th, at 10 
a. m., at Trinity Church, Asheville. This 
convention has been called for the pur- 
pose of electing a successor to the Right 
Reverend Robert E. Gribbin whose re- 
signation as diocesan was accepted at 
the House of Bishops meeting. 

Clerical delegates shall be all clergy- 
men canonically resident in the diocese 
and lay delegates shall be elected by the 
vestries and mission committees. Par- 
ishes are entitled to three lay delegates 
and organized missions shall send one 
lay delegate. At the convention, all 
nominations will come from the floor 
and the election shall be by orders; 
clerical delegates will vote as one body 
and lay delegates as another. A con- 
currence of both orders present and vot- 
ing shall be necessary to determine the 



choice, provided that two-thirds of all 
the clergy entitled to vote and lay dele- 
gates from two-thirds of all the parishes 
and congregations entitled to represen- 
tation be present; otherwise, two-thirds 
of the votes of each order present shall 
be necessary to a choice. 

There is much interest being shown 
in many parts of the diotese over the 
forthcoming convention and election. 
Names are being sent to a fact-finding 
committee with the request that the men 
named have information collected about 
them that will be useful in determining 
who could best serve the diocese as 
bishop. 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. William 
Redwood, has asked The Highland 
Churchman to call particular attention 
to the requirement that the 1947 AS- 
SESSMENT must be paid in full before 
a parish or mission can seat its dele- 
gates. 



Fact Finding Committee Named 



The Standing Committee at a meeting 
held November 11th, named a fact-find- 
ing committee that is empowered to col- 
lect data on men who are proposed as 
possible nominees for bishop of the 
diocese. This committee does not have 
any powers of nomination or recommen- 
dation, but exists solely for the purpose 
of securing all information that may be 
asked for concerning a man's ability, ex- 
perience, theological training or other 
biographical material. Information gath- 
ered will be available to communicants 
of the diocese upon request to the com- 
mittee either prior to the special conven- 
tion or at the time of the convention. 
The committee, through its chairman, 
will give facts only upon definite request, 
and these facts will be as of the date of 
the request. 

The initial meeting of the fact-finding 



committee was held at Holy Cross 
Church, Tryon, on November 18th. The 
Rev. William T. Capers was named 
chairman, Mr. Kingsland VanWinkle 
vice-chairman, and Mrs. Mark Dicker- 
son of Rutherfordton, recording secre- 
tary. Other members present were the 
reverend messrs. W. C. Leach, John 
Tuton and Gale Webbe, Mr. William 
Balthis and Mrs. A. B. Stoney. Mr. 
George Wiese and Mr. William Frue are 
also members of the committee. A sub- 
committee was named, consisting of the 
chairman and vice-chairman and the 
Rev. John Tuton and the Rev. Gale 
Webbe. This sub-committee was to 
draw up the models of letters of inquiry 
that would be sent concerning anyone 
whose name is proposed. Letters would 
be sent to the following in the diocese 
in which the proposed priest is minister- 



ing: the bishop of that diocese, the presi- 
dent of the standing committee, a lay- 
man on the standing committee, and 
the president of the diocesan Woman's 
Auxiliary. 

The names of those proposed as pos- 
sible nominees must be accompanied by 
the name of the person proposing, and 
should be sent to the chairman of the 
fact-finding committee, the Rev. Wm. T. 
Capers, Tryon, N. C. 



Rev. William T. Capers, Jr., 
Chairman 

Tryon, N. C. 

November 22, 1947. 

To the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese: 

It is with the sincere desire to be of 
the greatest possible assistance to the 
Clergy and Laity of the Diocese in the 
fulfillment of their solemn responsibility 
in the selection of a Bishop, that your 
Standing Committee has appointed a 
fact finding committee. This committee 
has been chosen with meticulous care. 
It represents the Clergy and the Laity 
from all parts of the Diocese, men and 
women whose churchmanship is diver- 
gent, but whose hopes are all blended 
together in one united prayer to God, 
that through the guidance of the Holy 
Spirit we may select a man as the Bishop 
of Western North Carolina whose good- 
ness of character, broadness of vision 
and inspiration of leadership may weld 
us into one family, who, with the spirit 
of Christian enthusiasm, may take up 
with renewed faith the challenging tasks 
that lie before us. 

This committee has no authority. It 
is in no sense of the word a nominating 
committee. It is just what its name im- 
plies. Its duty is the dissemination of 
facts about the presbyter or presbyters 
in whom you are interested, and about 
whom you wish to have more knowledge. 

The democracy of the Church is of 
primary importance at a time like this. 




Trinity Church, Asheville, where the 
special convention will be held Jan- 
uary 24. 



We want the people of the various par- 
ishes and missions to feel their definite 
right in the selection of a man who is to 
preside over this Diocese as our Father 
in God. This you can do by submitting 
the name or names of the presbyters 
whom you feel are best qualified to fill 
this high office. In view of the limited 
time available to the Committee to make 
investigation it is requested that all 
names of suggested candidates be sub- 
mitted to the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee within thirty days of the date of this 
letter. We would also ask you to make 
this election a matter of your personal 
prayers, and to see to it that each Sun- 
day the prayer that has been authorized 
by the Standing Committee be said in 
your Church. 



Faithfully yours, 

William T. Capers, Jr., 
Chairman. 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



ASCENSION, HICKORY 

The Rev. Robert B. Campbell was 
instituted as Rector of the Church of the 
Ascension, Hickory, Sunday evening, 
October 26th. Mr. T. M. Johnston and 
Mr. T. M. Whitener, Wardens of As- 
cension, stood at the Altar rail and for- 
mally presented their new Rector the 
keys to the church. The Letter of In- 
stitution came from San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, signed by the Seal of the Diocese 
by Bishop Gribbin. The Rev. Charles 
G. Leavell acted as Institutor in behalf 
of Bishop Gribbin and the Standing 
Committee, and also preached the ser- 
mon which ended with a pastoral charge 
to the new Rector. The congregation of 
about eighty persons filled the church 
practically to capacity. 

Prior to the Institution the Vestry- 
men and their wives were guests of the 
Rev. and Mrs. Robert Campbell at a 
buffet dinner in the newly-decorated 
Rectory. 



GRACE, MORGANTON 

The Rt. Rev. James M. Stoney, D. D., 
Bishop of New Mexico and Southwest 
Texas, preached on the mission of the 
Church and especially within his own 
Diocese at the 11:00 A. M. Holy Com- 
munion in Grace Church, Morganton, 
November 2nd. Acting at the request 
of Bishop Gribbin and in his behalf. 
Bishop Stoney confirmed a class of five 
candidates for Confirmation. In spite 
of a driving rain that Sunday over nine- 
ty persons were present for the service. 

Bishop Stoney spoke at a luncheon 
meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary of 
Grace Church on Monday, November 
3rd, with about 35 women present. He 
told of the Church's work among the 
Navajo Indians and of the obligations 
of the United States to these first fami- 
lies of America which as yet our gov- 
ernment has only partially and half- 
heartedly filled. Recently U. S. Gov- 
ernment agents have been in conference 
with missionaries of the Church seeking 



to improve conditions among the fast- 
growing Navajo Indians now numbering 
over 60,000 compared to 7,000 in 1880. 
The Church's mission to the Navajos, at 
present barely touching the problems 
and possibilities, is shared by the Dio- 
ceses of Arizona and New Mexico and 
Southwest Texas. Bishop Stoney is 
brother to Mr. A. B. Stoney, a member 
of our Diocesan Standing Committee. 

The Church School in Grace Church, 
with the addition of a Men's Bible 
Class, of which Mr. H. L. Riddle, Jr., is 
President, has taken on new life this 
past fall with attendance running as 
high as seventy persons. 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew re- 
cently elected new officers for the Broth- 
erhood year which begins November 
30th, St. Andrew's Day. Mr. Dewey 
Oxford was elected Director, Mr. Wil- 
liam Cobb, Vice-Director, and Mr. Wil- 
liam Mclntyre, Secretary-Treasurer. 
The Brotherhood is planning a direct- 
aid program to a Church of England 
individual or family, and inquiries are 
now under way concerning this project. 
The Chapter meets bi-monthly for a 
corporate communion and a business 
session, and seeks to stimulate church 
attendance and interest through personal 
evangelism throughout the year. 

The new Rectory for Grace Church 
is now almost complete, and may be 
occupied by the Rector and his family 
before Christmas. 

Mr. B. A. Jacobs, III, is serving as 
Every-Member-Canvass Chairman for 
Grace Church this year, and has used 
more than a score of all-male canvassers 
in the prosecution of what appears to 
be the best canvass yet in this parish. 
With considerable "'clean-up work" yet 
to be done we are only a thousand dol- 
lars short of our parochial goal, and the 
Church's Program figure set by the Ves- 
try (which is in excess of the apportion- 
ment set by the Diocese) of $1,300.00 
has been over-subscribed. 



ST. MARY'S, QUAKER MEADOWS 

St. Mary's Mission Committee met 
November 13th and elected Mr. John 
Oxford, Delegate, and Mr. Sam Wall, 
Alternate ,to represent St. Mary's at the 
special Convention of the Diocese to be 
held January 14th, 1948. Plans were 
made for cleaning out the mission well, 
grading the property to eliminate water 
in the basement of the church, and pro- 
viding sanitation facilities. A budget 
was adopted whereby one-third of the 
total receipts of the Mission go towards 
the Church's Missionary Program. 



The 11:00 A. M. services at Grace 
Church are now being broadcast over 
Morganton's new Radio Station WMNC 
(149) once every five Sundays. October 
26th was our first broadcast date; No- 
vember 30th is to be our next one; Jan- 
uary 4th our first in 1948. If you live 
within 35 miles of Morganton and have 
no 11:00 A. M. service of your own. or 
happen to be ill, tune in on our broad- 
cast. 



ST. STEPHEN'S MISSION, 
MORGANTON 

St. Stephen's property was recently 
sold by the Trustees of the Diocese to a 
group of Morganton doctors, at the re- 
quest of St. Stephen's congregation. We 
retain the right to use the church build- 
ing for eighteen months, and to move 
same if such proves feasible. At the 
present time negotiations are under way 
towards securing a lot in a more favor- 
able location. Whether the old church 
is used or a completely new one is erect- 
ed it is planned that more adequate 
facilities will be provided in a better 
neighborhood to reach the members and 
potential members of this mission. 



ACTIVITY AT ASCENSION 

Great activity has marked the work 
of the congregation of the Church of the 
Ascension this fall. Under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Dan H. Ligon, Superin- 
tendent, the Church School has more 
than doubled its membership, rising 
from 30 to about 75 students, enrolled. 
Seven new teachers have been added to 



the staff, and one of these is Professor 
William Brandon of the Lenoir-Rhyne 
College faculty, who is teaching the new- 
ly formed adult class, with about twenty 
members. Other new teachers are Miss 
Elizabeth Council, Junior girls; Mrs. J. 
C. Cobb, Primary; Mr. J. C. Cobb, Sen- 
ior boys; Mr. Hugh Robertson, Junior 
boys; Mrs. Holcolmb, Kindergarten; 
and Mrs. Robert B. Campbell, Senior 
girls. 

The Fall United Thank Offering for 
the women of the Church was received 
early in the fall, and amounted to 
#107.36. Youth Sunday, members of 
the Young People's Fellowship helped 
in the service, the lessons being read by 
Bill and Reid Poovey, and the morning 
prayer being conducted by Joe Petree, 
and Manly Whitener. The Rev. Robert 
B. Campbell, rector of the church, 
preached the sermon on: "Youth and 
the Bible". The Youth Sunday offer- 
ing was $28. 

The Young People's Fellowship is 
growing, with new equipment for their 
use being donated by Mrs. R. E. Simp- 
son, and consisting of a ping pong set 
and table, and a victrola. 

The Altar Guild has started plans for 
new vestments for the choir, and has 
ordered the 1940 Edition Hymnal for 
the entire Church. 

A Hallowe'en party for the children 
of the Church School was held, and the 
proceeds were given to the Church 
School for its use. 

On November 7, a Parish Supper was 
held in the American Legion Hall with 
an address bv the rector on the future 
of the work of the Church of the Ascen- 
sion, and moving pictures of Patterson 
School, Happy Valley, were shown 
through the help of Dr. O. H. Browne, 
of the Lenoir-Rhyne College faculty, 
and the courtesy of Mr. G. F. Wiese, 
Superintendent, and Mr. Van Cleve. 
Both Mr. Wiese and Mr. Van Cleve 
made moving talks. 

The general church attendance this 
fall has been very good, and four new 
pews have been added to accommodate 
the congregation. A nursery school is 
conducted at 11 a. m., for the sake of 
(Continued on Page 14) 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Elizabeth Van Noppen 



St. Paul's, Bear Mountain, in Am- 
herst County, Virginia, the mission to 
which our Advent boxes will be sent, is 
a unique one. Its work is among some 
five hundred people with a curious racial 
history. Long ago, when some Indians 
were travelling through the mountains, 
some remained behind and settled in 
Amherst County, intermarrying with 
the local white population. Since then 
they have also intermarried with the 
negro population and have been looked 
upon as outcasts. 

A seminary student discovered them 
around 1914, untaught and neglected. 
Through his interest a school and mis- 
sion was started. These have accom- 
plished so much that the State now pays 
the teacher's salary and the church and 
school have splendid cooperation in their 
work. 

These people own no land, but work 
as tenants or farm laborers. They are 
really poverty-stricken, and are most 
grateful for what the Episcopal church 
does for them. They are visited regu- 
larly by our minister from Amherst, Va., 
and to date no other denomination has 
shown any interest in them. 

The Mission is most fortunate in hav- 
ing Miss Isabel Wagner in charge. She 
has worked there faithfully for several 
years with remarkable results. Every 
article we have sent this fall will be put 
to good use by Miss Wagner. 



The District Auxiliary meeting were 
held during October as follows: 

District No. 1 at All Souls, Biltmore. 

District No. 2 at Holy Cross, Tryon. 

District No. 3 at Grace Church, Mor- 
ganton. 

District No. 4 at The Redeemer, Shel- 
by. 

District No. 5 at St. Matthias, Ashe- 
ville. 

At each of these meetings, a member 
of the Standing Committee spoke on 
"The steps necessary to election of a 



Bishop", a clergyman spoke on "Evan- 
gelism", and the Diocesan officers gave 
brief reports. 



February the 8th has been announced 
as "Race Relations Sunday". 



It is a little late to be announcing the 
birth of a new branch of the Auxiliary, 
it being now six months old, but it is 
good news at any time to hear that the 
women at St. Andrews, Bessemer City, 
have organized. Miss Patricia Page is 
the church worker at this mission. 



The program for the Episcopal Hour 
broadcasts to be heard each Sunday at 
8:30 a. m. during December is as fol- 
lows: 

December 7th: The Rt. Rev. John 
E. Hines, Bishop Coadjutor of Texas. 

December 14th: The Rev. Louis C. 
Melchior, Trinity Church, Columbia, 
S. C. 

December 21st: The Rt. Rev. Henry 
Knox Sherrill, Presiding Bishop. 

December 28th: Special Christmas 
Program. 



To all branches: News of any special 
Christmas activities would be greatly 
appreciated by the Promotion Secretary, 
112 Powe St., Morganton, N. C. 



The mission study book recommend- 
ed for use by our Church, as well as by 
many of the Protestant Churches, for 
this year is "Committed Unto Us" by 
Willis Lamott. It may be ordered from 
the Church Missions House, 281 Fourth 
Ave., New York, and costs one dollar 
for the paper edition. 

It is a presentation of the subject of 
Evangelism. It tells what has been ac- 
complished in the foreign mission field, 
what needs to be done, and what tre- 
mendous opportunities face the Chris- 
tian Church in the mission fields. Space 
is also devoted to the place and chal- 



8 



lenge of the Christian Church in Europe 
today. 

A rather startling chapter presents 
the picture in North America today, 
where no more than half the population 
claim membership in any church, Chris- 
tian or Jewish. 

The need for the presentation of the 
Christian Gospel in our own communi- 
ties and in all the world is presented, as 
well as an intelligent presentation of the 
methods to meet these needs. 

A guide for leaders of study groups, 
"Ventures in Witnessing", may be se- 
cured for twenty-five cnts. An illustrat- 
ed booklet "New World Ahead", by 
David Baker, is seventy-five cents. A 
packet containing "Committed Unto 
Us", "Ventures in Witnessing", "Ye 
Shall Be Witnesses", "A Presentation of 
the Work of Our Church", and a Map 
of the Anglican Communion around the 
World, may be secured for one dollar 
fifty cents. 

Every Parish and Mission branch of 
the Auxiliary should plan during the 
year a series of study meetings on this 
material. 



New Chairman of Altar Guild Work 
is Miss Virginia T. Green, Box 442, 
Saluda, N. C. 

Chairman of Personnel is Mrs. Wil- 
liam T. Capers, Jr., Tryon, N. C. 



The Auxiliary of St. Luke's, Boone, 
has a gold mine. Booths are set up in 
two tobacco warehouses during auction 
days, the ladies taking turns in dispens- 
ing coffee, hamburgers, soft drinks and 
candy. Each day of sales has seen a 
very tidy sum collected through the sales 
of these indispensable items. 



RURAL WORK MEETING 

Rochester, N. Y. — Oregon, Maine, 
Western North Carolina, Virginia, were 
among the thirty dioceses in the United 
States represented by sixty Episco- 
palians who attended the National Con- 
vocation on the Church in Town and 
Country held in Rochester, N. Y., No- 
vember 4-6. This three-day meeting, 
which drew 650 delegates from the non- 
Roman Communions of the United 
States and Canada, was held under the 
auspices of the Committee on Town and 
Country of the Home Missions Council 
of North America, the Federal Council 
of the Churches of Christ in America 
and the International Council of Reli- 
gious Education. The Rev. Clifford L. 
Samuelson, Associate Secretary, Division 
of Domestic Missions of the National 
Council, served as chairman of the group 
of Episcopalians, who met for two 
luncheon meetings in the Hotel Roches- 
ter, once as the Rural Workers' Fellow- 
ship in St. Luke's parish house and once 
for a supper meetin gat the YMCA. A 
Corporate Communion was held in 
Christ Church. Other leaders were 
Hiss Elizabeth Rhea, Assistant Secre- 
tary for Rural Work, National Council; 
Prof. W. V. Dennis of Penn State Col- 
lege; the Rev. W. Francis Allison, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the Rural Workers' 
Fellowship of the Episcopal Church; 
and Capt. William Paddock of the 
Church Army. Four Church theological 
seminaries sent students to the Convo- 
ation — Bexley Hall, Cambier, 0.; the 
Church Divinity School of the Pacific, 
Berkeley, Calif.; Episcopal Theological 
School, Cambridge, Mass.; and the 
Theological Seminary in Virginia, Alex- 
andria, Va. 



NOTICE TO PARISH TREASURERS 

The Department of Finance of the 
National Council has sent a letter to all 
diocesan treasurers calling to their atten- 
tion the manner in which funds for the 
special campaign for radio programs and 
advertising will be handled. It is defin- 
itely recommended that all money col- 
lected within the Diocese be sent to Mr. 



William Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Drive, 
Biltmore Forest. 

This recommendation is in line with 
the canon law of the Diocese of Western 
North Carolina. Canon 4, section 1, 
states in part: "The Treasurer of the 
Diocese shall receive ... all funds that 
shall be raised and appropriated for the 
general work of the Church outside of 
the Diocese:" 



ACTION OF HOUSE OF BISHOPS 

The House of Bishops elected three 
Missionary Bishops at the Winston-Sal- 
em meeting. The vacancy created by 
the resignation of Bishop John B. Bent- 
ley of Alaska was filled by the election 
of the Rev. William J. Gordon, now in 
charge of St. Thomas' Mission, Point 
Hope, Alaska. He is a graduate of the 
University of North Carolina and the 
Virginia Seminary, and is 29 years old. 

Elected for service as Coadjutor of 
the Missionary District of Wyoming, 
the Rev. James W. Hunter, now rector 
of St. Mark's Church, San Antonio, Tex. 
He is 43 years old, graduate of Johns 
Hopkins and the Virginia Seminary. 

To be Bishop-Coadjutor of the Dis- 
trict of Southern Brazil, the Rev. Louis 
C. Melcher, rector of Trinity Church, 
Columbia, S. C. He is a graduate of 
the University of Wisconsin and the 
University of the South. He is 49 years 
old, and was a Canon, and later, Dean 
of St. Luke's Cathedral, Ancon, Panama 
Canal Zone. 



The House accepted the resignations 
of Bishops Robert E. Gribbin, Western 
North Carolina; John T. Dallas, New 
Hampshire; E. J. Randall, Suffragan of 
Chicago; Benjamin T. Kemerer, Suffra- 
gan of Minnesota; Frank W. Creighton, 
Michigan; A. A. Gilman, Hankow, 
China; and John B. Bentley, Alaska. 



THE REV. B. M. LACKEY, SR., ILL 

At deadline time it has been reported 
to The Highland Churchman that the 
Rev. Boston M. Lackey, rector of St. 
James, Lenoir, has been ill. Dr. Lackey 
underwent an operation and due to some 
slight complications, was not able to 
take services in his parishes as soon as 
he had hoped to do so. 

In the absence of the rector, The Rev. 
J. Norton Atkins has been in charge of 
Sunday services. Father Atkins served 
as both a seminarian and priest in the 
Diocese in the days when it was the 
Missionary District of Asheville. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Subsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers of the Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. - 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



10 



Young Churchmen's News 



TRINITY 

The young people of Trinity had a 
Corporate Communion on Youth Sun- 
day, followed by breakfast in the parish 
house. They also had a meeting that 
afternoon, at which time the Rector 
spoke to them. 

On Tuesday, October 28, the Young 
People had a Hallowe'en party, night 
club style, in the parish house. The 
room was decorated in traditional orange 
and black, and the stage was flocked by 
corn stalks on either side of the piano. 
Drinks and sandwiches were sold in the 
course of the evening, and an entertain- 
ment program of songs, dances, and 
piano selections was put on by some of 
the members. The attendance was 
gratifying, and everyone enjoyed danc- 
ing between entertainment. 



BESSEMER CITY 

Youth Sunday was observed in Bes- 
semer with the young people taking part 
in the evening worship service. 



GASTONIA 

The young people have not been 
meeting during the summer, but this 
fall they began by electing new officers 
for the coming year. They are: 

President, Farris Thomas; Vice Presi- 
dent, Jimmy McKenzie; Secretary- 
Treasurer, Becky Marshall; Program 
Chairman, Bernie Atkinson. 

On Saturday, November 1, they had 
a Scavenger Hunt, followed by supper 
in the parish house. Young people from 
Bessemer City and High Shoals were 
invited to this party. 



CALVARY 

Another square dance was held at Cal- 
vary on October 24, to mark the end of 
a successful series of parties. There was 
a large attendance present, and refresh- 
ments were served in the course of the 
evening. 



BAT CAVE 

A letter from Beatrix Deutsch: After 
the meeting in Morganton, we, the 
young people of the Church of the 
Transfiguration, organized our group. 

As our first project we sent a $10 
CARE box to a needy family in Europe. 
We raised the money by giving a game 
party from which we made $16.35. 

Our next project for Thanksgiving is 
to help one in our community. 

The whole Sunday School is helping to 
clean our beautiful new church — each 
person for a month at a time. 



Dear Young Churchmen: 

I wish you knew how hard it is for 
me to get just this little bit of news to 
you, because no one seems to want to 
take it upon himself to send me any 
news of what has been going on in their 
leagues. Just think how interesting the 
paper would be if everyone co-operated 
and sent in a few lines each month. It 
would be a very interesting issue for all 
concerned, and it would also be helpful 
for the groups who are not very well 
organized to learn what the other young 
people are doing. Won't you make the 
next issue the best yet, by sending in 
news of your activities. Everyone is 
busy during the Christmas season, and 
what else is more interesting than the 
different types of parties put on by you 
on Christmas and New Year? 

THE ED. 



Dear Young Churchmen: 

When Helen Thomas asked me in 
Asheville to write a letter to you, among 
my first questions was ''What shall I 
write about: How long shall it be?" — 
and so forth. Then when I got home I 
began to think about this letter. I want- 
ed someone to tell me what to do and 
then keep after me until I did it. I think 
many of us are this way. We have to 
be pushed until we finally do something. 



11 



It's true in our League, and I'm afraid 
it's true in other Leagues. Someone is 
given a part in the program, and if he 
isn't reminded fifty times, he forgets and 
doesn't do his part. 

I wonder if we ever stopped to think 
what would happen if everyone did his 
job well, and no one had to coax him 
to do it. We would have a very strong 
League and others would probably like 
to join it. This could easily be done, if 
everyone would do his job, no matter 
how small, and do it well. We are plen- 
ty capable and all we need is a little 
support of our League and District. 
Let's not be half-hearted and say, "Well, 
Jim or Sue always see that things are 
done; they don't need me to help them." 
They do need you, and we need more 
Jims and Sues in our Young Churchmen 
of the Diocese. 

Please don't think I'm preaching to 
you. I wouldn't steal my father's thun- 
der for -anything! I leave preaching to 
him. But there's always room for im- 
provement both in ourselves and in our 
Church. 

Sincerely, 
Your President, 
Mary Aston Leavell. 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

At KANUGA CONFERENCES 

June 1st to September 1st 

Religious Books Ecclesiastical Arts 

Church School Supplies 

Owned and Operated by 

Kanuga Conference, Hendersonville, N. C. 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

"Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



YOUTH SERVICE AT VALLE CRUCIS 

The branch of the Girls' Friendly 
Society at Holy Cross, Valle Crucis, had 
a special service on Sunday night, No- 
vember 23rd. The primary object of 
the service was to tell in vivid form of 
the many activities that are being car- 
ried on by the branch. 

The opening service was one of the 
special litanies found in the Forward 
Movement, "Prayers New and Old", a 
litany of the disciples' way. After a 
short address by the priest-in-charge, 
and an offeratory, the service was turned 
over to the GFS branch. Mrs. Mont 
Glovier, group adviser, spoke on the 
meaning of a GFS branch to the com- 
munity and church. Then the members 
in turn spoke on the several aspects of 
the activities of the branch. 

The branch has already contributed 
$70 to the parish house fund, #20 for a 
medicine fund for the community, made 
scrapbooks for hospitalized children, 
sent clothing to overseas relief. A study 
is being made of the four Gospels, all 
members are regular in Church and Sun- 
day School attendance, the GFS helps 
with the choir and all have been con- 
firmed. Homemaking is studied as is 
primary first aid. All the girls have 
learned the art of thermometer reading 
and the rules of diet and health are giv- 
en special care in study and practice. 

At the conclusion of the service, Mrs. 
Glovier made awards of thermometers 
to all those who had passed the tests in 
thermometer-reading and first aid. 

It should be noted that all these ac- 
tivities do not require a large group for 
the success of a branch, for the branch 
at Valle Crucis has nine members. 



CHURCH GARDEN IS CLUB PROIECT 

The Boys' Club at Valle Crucis acted 
as chairman for the 1947 Lord's Acre. 
Hybrid corn was planted in the Church 
Garden, and the men and boys of the 
Church harvested the crop. Over 100 
bushels of corn was made, so it is ex- 
pected t hat over $200 will be turned 
over to the treasurer from this project. 



12 



Question Box 



What is the difference in a parish and 
a mission? 

A parish is an independent church, 
self-supporting financially. A mission is 
a church dependent on the diocese or a 
parish for its support and development. 

When a church is first established in 
an area, it is set up as a mission. The 
bishop appoints a committee, which fills 
the functions of a vestry, working with 
the priest in charge. 

The mission does not have the right 
to elect its own committee. The com- 
mittee usually is appointed on recom- 
mendation of the pastor. The pastor, or 
priest in charge, is sent by the bishop. 

After the church has grown to the 
point that it can care for its own devel- 
opment, it may petition the diocese for 
recognition as a parish. 

When the church becomes a parish, 
it elects its own vestrymen, and the ves- 
try calls the rector. 

The parishes and missions are united 
in a diocese, which is a geographical area 
under the jurisdiction of a bishop. 

When the diocese is first founded, and 
before it is financially independent, it is 
called a missionary district. The House 
of Bishops elects the head of the mis- 
sionary district, who is called a mission- 
ary bishop. 

After the missionary district becomes 
self-supporting, it gains the status of 
diocese, and has the right to elect its 
own bishop. 

The bishop may move the priest in 
charge of a mission from one church to 
another, or the priest may accept a call 
to a parish. Likewise, the missionary 
bishop may be elected bishop of a 
diocese. 

The rector of the parish is elected until 
retirement, or until he accepts a call to 
another parish. The bishop of a diocese 
is elected head of that diocese until his 
retirement. He is not able to accept 
election to another diocese. 



"My Pledge"— To Increase My 
Pledge. 



The Book of Common Prayer states 
"My Duty Toward God is to Worship 
Him Every Sunday in His Church." 



"I Cried Because I Had No Shoes 
Until I Saw A Man With No Feet!" 



Repentence was once defined by a 
small girl, "It's to be sorry enough to 
quit." — C. H. Kilmer. 



The Anglican child is taught that to 
the question, "Where was the Church 
of England before the Reformation?" 
the correct reply is the counter question: 
"Where was your face before you wash- 
ed it?" — Canon Leonard Hodgson. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at B elk's 



STUDIOS OF 
GGORGG L.PAYDG 

245 BROADWAY » PATGRSOn D.J. 
It FOUQDCO<lSS6 8 

CHQRCH fflGfllORIALS 

STAIDGD GLASS 'WOOD-ffiGTAL 

ALLCHORCH CRAFTS 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE, VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



13 



THE COUNT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE. N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis Garrett Conant 
Headmaster 




Samuel J. FISHER Company 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville. N. C. 



CALL TELEPHONE 24 FOR 

Coal — Esso Heat Fuel Oil 
Iron Fireman Stokers 

Esso Oil Burners 

J-M Home Insulation 

Kool Shade Sun Screens 

A. P. Green Refractory Products 

Citizens Transfer and Coal Co. 

18 Flat Iron Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



ACTIVITY AT ASCENSION 

(Continued from Page 7) 
the young parents who have children too 
young to bring into the church. 

The rector has started a series of 
Wednesday evening lectures at the re- 
quest of the congregation, and proposes 
to continue these indefinitely. At the 
present he is lecturing on "How The 
Bible Came Down To Us." 

The congregation is looking forward 
to the starting of a Young Adult Club 
for the many young adults of the con- 
gregation. 

The choir has expended great time 
and effort in the work of the music of 
the church, and at present there are 
about twenty in the choir, the junior 
choir singing with the senior choir on 
Sunday mornings. 




The Rt. Rev. Charles Clingman, 
Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese 
of Kentucky, opens fall season of 
the Episcopal Bowling League, at 
Louisville. Six churches are mem- 
bers of the league, with some 100 
men bowling regularly throughout 
the season. The Bishop, rolling 
the first ball, was credited with a 
strike. 



14 



PATTERSON SCHOOL FILM SHOWN 

The Patterson School film "Happy 
Valley," was shown at a meeting of the 
Men's Club of St. John's Parish, Marion, 
on Monday evening, December 1. In 
a short talk before the presentation of 
the film, George Wiese, Superintendent 
of Patterson, quoted Mr. Jordan, Pub- 
licity Director of the National Council, 
New York City, as saying that "Happy 
Valley" is the best promotional film put 
out as yet for the Church on a church 
subject. As a consequence, the film is 
being given a national circulation 
through the National Council, Mr. Wiese 
reported. 

The film "Happy Valley" is being 
made available to church groups, service 
clubs and other organizations in North 
Carolina and adjoining states through 
Mr. Donald Van Cleve, Registrar, Pat- 
terson School, Legerwood, N. C. It has 
already been widely shown in this di- 
ocese at parish suppers and other church 
gatherings, as well as at -non-church 
groups. 



Compliments 
of 

Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 



TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 




K«3 c^mi TTYTA V0i0W6ENESEE-5T-:j 
|.VjOOJl l -\jLJL/l\/ t 3YRAGU3E:-rNY+ :! 



TFk Patterson ScJiool 




Episcopal, School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. Wiese, Supt. 

COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 

PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



The Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



15 



Mrs* J, £* A"bel 



Wayne sifi. JL 



LAYMAN'S GROUP HAS MEETING 

(Continued from Page 3 ) 
an integrating agent for the work among 
laymen done on the parish or mission 
level. Keymen, chosen from each parish 
and mission, would be able to carry to 
their individual groups the plans that 
would lead to a strengthening of all lay- 
men's work in the Diocese. One of the 
major plans discussed was for a supper 
meeting on the night of the special con- 
vention, a meeting which would have 
as its purpose to bring a keyman from 
every parish and mission into a working 
organization for the Diocese. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

IOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Zpisiopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic coursei fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre camput — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



{MitgManfc 
Cljtttcljman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



FEBRUARY, 1948 



NO. lCf 



fir- 




Saint Mark's Church, Gastonia 



Oltjurrtjman 

Box 55 Valle Crucis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville^ North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price 5c per copy, 50c a year. 

The Bishop, the Rt. Rev. Robert E. 
Gribbin, D. D, Asheville, N. C. 

The Diocesan Treasurer. Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



The Special Convention 

And they appointed two, Joseph call- 
ed Barsabas, who was surnamed Justus, 
and Matthias. And they prayed, and 
said, Thou, Lord, which knowest the 
hearts of all men, shew whether of these 
two thou hast chosen, that he may take 
part of this ministry and apostleship . . . 
And they gave forth their lots ; and the 
lot fell upon Matthias . . . 

Acts 1:23-26. 



It is entirely possible that Barsabas 
received some of the votes cast when 
the lot fell upon Matthias, for there 
has always been room for honest differ- 
ence of opinion among men in the 
Church. We in the Diocese can now 
look back upon the Convention with 
thankfulness; we can be thankful that 
there was no rancor in the casting of 
lots although there were honest differ- 
ences of opinion as to who should suc- 
ceed to the office of bishop. We can be 
thankful that the straw-man of church- 
manship (high or low) was not set up 



as an oratorical punching bag. This 
apparent willingness of churchmen of 
several shades of opinion to dwell togeth- 
er in peace and harmony argues well for 
the future harmonious working of the 
Diocese. 

The interest of the Convention was 
about equally divided between the 
election of a bishop and the issue of 
the re-division of the dioceses in North 
Carolina. It is to be regretted that the 
Standing Committee had not been given 
more time to consider the proposals and 
to make them known throughout the 
Diocese. For many who came to the 
Convention it was a great surprise to 
learn of proposals to defer election un- 
til the matter of diocesan realignment 
could be studied. 

Editorially, the North Carolina 
Churchman has asked that the possibil- 
ity of changing diocesan boundaries be 
given serious thought, free from prej- 
udices and sentiment. We heartily 
second this point of view, believing that 
we must always try to determine what 
is best for the Church rather than our 
particular segment of it. 

In our opinion the Diocese was en- 
tirely right in proceeding with the elec- 
tion, for many months or even several 
years may elapse before any decision 
can be reached. We would be doing 
the Church as a whole no service by 
moving haltingly as we would if we 
were without the leadership of a bishop. 
We cannot afford to mark time while 
waiting to see what other diocese are 
willing to do. 

With a bishop at the head of the 
Diocese, we will have an authoritative 
spokesman who can sit in the councils 
of the Church and make the decisions 
which will affect the Church lives of 
those in Western North Carolina. 

By all means let us lay to heart the 
problem of realigning the dioceses, and 
let us have the faith that God will lead 
us where He wills us to be. 



The Rev. F. B. Tucker 
Elected Bishop 

The Rev. Dr. Francis Bland Tucker, 
rector of Christ Church, Savannah, Ga., 
was elected Bishop of the Diocese of 
Western North Carolina at a special 
convention, meeting at Trinity Church, 
Asheville, January 14th. He was elect- 
ed on the fourth ballot when 13 of the 
25 priests attending and 56 of 78 lay 
delegates cast their votes in his favor. 

Runner-up in the balloting was the 
Rev. Dr. John S. Higgins, rector of 
Gethsemane Church, Minneapolis, 
Minn., who received 12 clerical and 15 
lay votes. 

Dr. Tucker was born in Norfolk, Va., 
January 6, 1895, the son of Bishop 
Beverly Dandridge Tucker of Southern 
Virginia and Anna Maria (Washington). 
A brother, the Rt. Rev. Henry St. 
George Tucker, was Presiding Bishop 
until his retirement last year. Another 
brother, the Rt. Rev. Bevery Dandridge 
Tucker, is bishop of the Diocese of Ohio. 



Dr. Tucker Declines Election 

It was announced to the Con- 
vocation of Asheville and printed 
in the public press that Dr. F. B. 
Tucker has declined to accept the 
election as bishop of this diocese. 



STANDING COMMITTEE SETS DATE 
FOR NEW ELECTION 

The Standing Committee of the Dio- 
cese of Western North Carolina met in 
Trinity Church Parish House Friday, 
February 6. The President, The Rev. 
Mark Jenkins, presided, six members 
being present. 

A letter was read from The Rev. F. 
Bland Tucker, Bishop-elect, declining 
the election. He said his declining was 
the most difficult decision he had ever 
had to make and the reasons had noth- 
ing to do with the work and opportuni- 
ties in this Diocese, as he would very 
much like to be a part of this work here. 
His work in his Parish in Savannah and 



the Diocese of Georgia is of such a na- 
ture at this time that he felt compelled 
to stay there rather than make a change 
now. This decision was received with 
great regret and a letter stating this feel- 
ing was sent to Dr. Tucker. 

A resolution was passed setting the 
time and place of another election. This 
will take place at the regular Diocesan 
Convention to be held in Grace Church, 
Morganton, May 13-14, 1948. Other 
routine business was transacted. 



Church Manners 

A casual visitor to Trinity Church on 
the morning of January 14th could not 
have guessed that the Special Conven- 
tion was to open with a celebration of 
the Holy Communion. Groups of dele- 
gates (lay and clerical) were gathered 
in the church talking in such loud tones 
that a repeated request for delegates 
to take their places in the pews went 
unheeded. Even the entrance of the 
sacred ministers and the beginning of 
the Lord's Own Service was not enough 
to stop the noise of what sounded like 
a modern Babel. Here was a sorry 
spectacle of members of a council, 
charged with the solemn obligation of 
choosing a successor to the apostles, 
who did not seem to be aware of the 
necessity for preparation to receive the 
Blessed Sacrament. And lest an editor- 
ially expressed desire for greater devo- 
tion to the Sacrament be branded as 
"extreme churchmanship", attention is 
called to the last paragraph on page 293 
of the Prayer Book. 

We are quite willing to admit that 
the great game of church politics is an 
engrossing one, and we are also quite 
willing to regret that our Church does 
not have enough money to erect a 
diocesan house for business meetings. 
Until the time comes when we can dis- 
pense with the former and possess the 
latter, we should exercise some self- 
discipline and practice good church 
manners. 



Highlights of Convention 



The celebrant at the opening service 
was the Rev. G. Mark Jenkins, rector 
of Calvary Church, Fletcher, and 
President of the Standing Committee. 
He was assisted by the rector of Trinity 
Church, the Rev. John Tuton. 

The Convention was called to order 
by the Rev. J. P. Burke, Secretary of 
the Standing Committee. Upon motion 
by the chancellor of the Diocese, Mr. 
Kingland Van Winkle, and by unani- 
mous vote of the Convention, Mr. Burke 
was elected presiding officer. The chair 
then appointed the Rev. Peter W. 
Lambert, 0. G. S. as acting secretary. 

The roll call of the clerical and lay 
delegates showed an almost 100 per 
cent representation from among the 
active clergy and the parishes and 
missions. There were 25 clerical and 78 
lay delegates given seat and vote. In- 
cluding delegates, alternates and visitors, 
the convention was very well attended. 

A proposal to prohibit nominating 
speeches was defeated. It was proposed 
that nominating speeches be limited to 
five minutes and seconding speeches to 
two minutes. Many of the delegates 
present were firm in their desire to have 
the number of seconding speeches be 
unlimited, and this opinion carried. 

The Rev. John Tuton made a brief 
address of welcome and invited dele- 
gates to luncheon as guests of the vestry 
and auxiliary. When this luncheon 
came as a welcome recess to debate, the 
chairman on hospitality, Fr. Webbe, 
made a speech of thanks. The ladies 
who prepared and served the luncheon 
were given an applauding vote of thanks. 

At the morning session A. B. Stoney 
leported for the Standing Committee. 



This report, which entailed suggestions 
from outside the Diocese for the election 
to be deferred, gave rise to much 
spirited debate. 

The Rev. C. G. Leavell made the 
suggestion that the inclusion of Mecklen- 
burg county into the Diocese might be 
more feasible than the incorporation of 
the western diocese into the central one. 

Mr. William C. Frue of Henderson- 
ville read a dissent from the report of 
the Fact Finding Committee. He held 
in presenting his minority report that 
the report was not true to the purpose 
implied by the name of the committee 
because much of the information given 
was opinion and not factual data. 

Following two motions calling for re- 
consideration of the motion to proceed 
with the convention and for adjourn- 
ment, the floor was opened to nomi- 
nations for the office of bishop. Besides 
Dr. Tucker and Dr. Higgins, the follow- 
ing clergymen were nominated: 

M. G. Jones, St. Andrew's, New Or- 
leans; M. George Henry, Christ Church, 
Charlotte; A. Rufus Morgan, St. Agnes, 
Franklin. X. C; Herbert A. Donovan, 
Christ Church, Charlottesville, Ya.; 
Thorne Sparkman, St. Paul's, Chatta- 
nooga; William S. Stoney, Grace 
Church, Anniston, Ala.; James P. Burke, 
St. James. Hendersonville. 

George R. Madson, St. Paul's, Al- 
bany, Ga.; Boston M. Lackey, St. James, 
Lenoir; John C. Grainger, St. Stephen's, 
Goldsboro; Albert R. Stuart, Christ 
Cathedral, New Orleans; Edgar R. Neff, 
Christ Church, Little Rock, Ark.; Mark 
Jenkins, Calvary Church, Fletcher; 
Clarence R. Haden, St. Phillip's, Dur- 
ham; and Frederick J. Warnecke, St. 
Mark's, Richmond, Ya. The Rev. 
James Kennedy received two write-in 
votes on the first ballot. 



Convention Declines To Delay Election 



The special convention refused to de- 
lay election of a bishop until consider- 
ation could be given to realigning the 
three diocese in North Carolina. How- 
ever, the way was left open for future 
consideration of proposals to enlarge the 
Eastern and Western diocese or to divide 
the state into two diocese. 

A. B. Stoney, reporting for the Stand- 
ing Committee, explained that the com- 
mittee had received requests to delay 
election until proposals to change dio- 
cesan boundaries could be studied. 
Much of Mr. Stoney's report consisted 
of reading letters received by the com- 
mittee or individual members of the 
committee. He read a letter printed in 
The North Carolina Churchman in 
which the writer, the Rev. James S. Cox 
of Winston-Salem, proposed that the 
state be divided into two diocese. His 
plan called for enlarging the Diocese of 
East Carolina by running its boundary 
directly north and south between 
Greensboro and Durham, and eliminat- 
ing Western North Carolina entirely as 
a separate diocese. His letter stated 
that with two large diocese, it would be 
possible to have two bishops in each 
diocese. 

The secular press in reporting on the 
special convention said Mr. Cox had 
urged deferment of an election in this 
diocese. He had not made such a pro- 
posal in his published letter. The dio- 
cesan paper of the Diocese of North 
Carolina, The North Carolina Church- 
man, editorially commended Mr. Cox's 
letter and urged a serious consideration 
of the proposals contained in it. 

Presiding Bishop Sherrill wrote to 
the Standing Committee strongly urging 
deferment of the election until the 
possibilities of re-drawing diocesan 
boundaries had been fully explored. 
Bishop Sherrill seemed to be of the 
opinion that it would be better to have 
only two diocese in the state. The 
Presiding Bishop's letter was received 



very late by the Standing Committee 
as it had been addressed to the Rev. 
George F. Rogers and forwarded to Mr. 
Rogers in Florida. Mr. Rogers was 
President of the Standing Committee 
prior to his retirement and the Diocesan 
Convention in May, 1947. 

A letter from the Rt. Rev. Bland 
Mitchell of Arkansas, an officer of the 
National Council, was read to the con- 
vention by Mr. Stoney. Bishop Mitchell 
urged delay of the election on the 
grounds that the inclusion of Western 
North Carolina into a larger diocese 
would be more practical financially. 
His letter mentioned the financial aid 
the diocese receives and indicated this 
help might have to be greatly reduced 
if Western North Carolina elected a 
diocesan and continued as a sepaarte 
diocese. 

Ed. Note: A sum in excess of $13,000 
was received by the Diocese last year 
from the National Council. This includ- 
es all United Thank Offering salaries 
paid to women workers in the Diocese. 
Money for these salaries comes from 
the Woman's Auxiliary and is admin- 
istered by the National Council. E. L. 
Kemper, chairman of the Department 
of Finance of the Diocese, stated in the 
later debate that the Diocese sent over 
$12,000 to the National Council during 
1947. 

Following Mr. Stoney's report, the 
Rev. I. N. Northup, rector of All Souls, 
Biltmore, moved that the convention 
proceed with the business of electing a 
bishop. The motion was carried. 

Dr. P. N. DeVere of Morganton made 
a motion calling for a reconsideration 
of Mr. Northup's motion. The debate 
on Dr. DeVere's motion occupied the 
whole morning session and continued 
after the luncheon recess. Following 
the recess, Dr. DeVere again took the 
floor to explain that the purpose of his 
motion was not to defeat an election, 
but had been called for by his feeling 



that the first motion implied a complete 
refusal of the Diocese to consider any 
future proposals to re-draw diocesan 
boundaries. The motion for reconsider- 
ation was defeated. 

The convention defeated a motion by 
the Rev. W. C. Cravner of Gastonia 



calling for an adjournment of the con- 
vention. However, it was decided to 
appoint a committee at the regular con- 
vention in May to study the question of 
diocesan realignment in cooperation 
with the dioceses of North Carolina and 
East Carolina. 



Results of The Balloting For The Election 
of Bishop of The Diocese 



Name 


Clerical 


Lay 


Clerical 


Lay 


Clerical 


Lay 


Clerical 


Lay 


Tucker, F. B. 


4 


34 


8 


51 


11 


56 


13 


56 


Jones, M. G. 





1 




















Henry, M. G. 


2 


6 


2 


1 














Morgan, A. R. 





5 





4 





4 





4 


Donovan, H. A. 


2 





1 





1 


1 








Sparkman, T. 


4 


6 


3 


5 


1 











Stoney, W. S. 


1 


6 




















Burke, J. P. 





5 


1 


1 





2 





3 


Madson, G. R. 





1 




















Lackey, B. M., Sr 


1 


3 




















Higgins, J. S. 


4 


6 


6 


10 


11 


15 


12 


15 


Grainger, J. C. 





3 




















Stuart, A. R. 


2 


2 


2 


2 














Warnecke, F. J. 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 











Neff, E. R. 


























Jenkins, G. M. 





1 




















Haden, C. R. 


1 























Kennedy, J. W. 


1 


1 





















I believe the first test of a truly great 
man is his humility. I do not mean, by 
humility, doubt of his own power. But 
really great men have a curious feeling 
that the greatest is not in them but 
through them. And they see something 
divine in every other man, and are end- 
lessly, foolishly, incredibly merciful. 

— Ruskin. 



There are eight regular Roman Catho- 
lic radio programs on four extensive 
networks, according to The Catholic 
Visitor. There are Churches that be- 
lieve radio broadcasting is productive. 



The Rev. Aubrey Caldwell Gilmore, 
who retired from the active ministry 
September, 1939, after having served as 
Priest-in-Charge of St. James Church, 
Black Mountain, and Chaplain at Oteen 
from 1934, died December 5th. He be- 
gan his ministry as a Congregationalist. 
Later he was ordained Deacon and 
Priest by Bishop Codman of Maine. 
Fr. Gilmore served congregations in 
Maine, Massachusetts, and Pennsyl- 
vania before coming to North Carolina. 



Convocation of Asheville Meeting 



An address by Father Bonnell Spen- 
cer, member of the Order of the Holy 
Cross and prior of St. Andrew's School 
for boys at Sewanee, Tenn., and election 
of officers featured the opening session 
of the Asheville Convocation of the 
Episcopal diocese of Western North 
Carolina February 3, in All Souls parish 
house. 



at the Church of the Redeemer and St. 
Luke's chapel. He told delegates to the 
Convocation that a new priest's living 
quarters are nearing completion at the 
Redeemer church and that the interior 
of St. Luke's has been completely re- 
decorated. A basement in the building 
has been equipped as a parish hall, he 
added. 



The second session of the convocation 
opened at 8 o'clock February 4, in 
Trinity church with a service of Holy 
Communion followed by three medita- 
tions by Father Spencer at 10 and 11 
o'clock and noon. 

Father Spencer, who is a leader of the 
annual Valley Forge Youth conference, 
spoke on "Youth Work." He was in- 
troduced by Father Westwell Green- 
wood, dean of the Convocation. 

Preceding his address, a paper en- 
titled, "What is Christianity" by the 
Rev. Clarence R. Haden, rector of St. 
Philip's church, Durham, was read, and 
a business meeting was conducted at 
which time reports by missionary priests 
of the convocation were given. 

Among these were reports by the Rev. 
Rufus Morgan, the Rev. Howard Rhys, 
and Father Greenwood. 

Mr. Morgan gave a report on work 
currently under way at Cherokee and 
discussed new missionary work at Soco 
Gap. He told of plans for the erection 
of a new church building and recreation 
hall on the Cherokee Indian reservation. 

Fr. Rhys discussed the new parish 
hall erected largely through volunteer 
labor among members at Trinity chapel 
and also reported the purchase of a new 
Litany desk as a gift by a member of 
the parish. 

Father Greenwood reported on work 



The Rev. Mark Jenkins, rector of 
Calvary church at Fletcher and presi- 
dent of the standing committee of the 
Western North Carolina diocese, an- 
nounced that Dr. F. Bland Tucker, D. 
D., rector of Christ church, Savannah, 
Ga., had declined election as bishop of 
the diocese. 

Father Greenwood was reelected dean 
of the Convocation and Mr. Rhys was 
reelected secretary and treasurer during 
a brief business meeting. 

Father Spencer was heard again last 
evening at a choral Evensong service 
at All Souls Church. 



TWO AIDED PARISHES ADVANCE 

At the first of the year, two aided 
parishes of the Diocese have taken all 
financial responsibility upon themselves. 
The two which have become self-sus- 
taining parishes are St. John's, Marion, 
and St. Paul's, W T ilkesboro. Father Al- 
bert Mack, rector of St. John's has done 
splendid work in Marion, not only in 
leading the parish to self support, but 
in his work with the Church School. 
The Rev. Boston M. Lackey, Sr., has 
overcome the difficulty of living thirty 
miles away where he is also rector of 
St. James, Lenoir, to lead St. Paul's to 
self-support. Mr. Lackey has often ex- 
pressed himself of being quite anxious 
for St. Paul's to have a full-time rector, 
for both Wilkesboro and North Wilkes- 
boro are rapidly growing. 



XRII I11I11I11HI 

M -^^^^m I III ill • 



The Rt. Rev. Henry K. Sherrill, Presiding Bishop, who wrote to the 
Standing Committee urging a deferment of the Episcopal election 
until re-division of the N. C. dioceses could be studied. The letter 
reached the Standing Committee just before the convention was held 
which elected the Rev. Dr. F. B. Tucker. 



Mr. Redwood Reports 



The report for the year, found else- 
where in this month's issue, is based on 
receipts up to January 26th. Parish and 
mission treasurers are cautioned to ex- 
amine their books to see if they are 
really in arrears for 1947. If it is not 
borne in mind that some of the receipts 
have come in during 1948, a financial 
score sheet would show: Parish assess- 
ments paid, 12; overpaid, 1; under- 
paid, 5. Parish quotas paid, 2; over- 
paid, 8; underpaid, 8. Mission assess- 
ments paid, 31; overpaid, 1; underpaid, 
2. Mission quota paid, 8; overpaid, 19; 
underpaid, 5. Unorganized mission as- 



sessments paid, 7; overpaid, none; un- 
derpaid, 7. Unorganized mission quota 
paid, 2; overpaid, 2; underpaid, 10. 

In a letter accompanying his report, 
Mr. Redwood said in part: "Our pay- 
ments to the 1947 Presiding Bishop's 
Fund for World Relief were over #5,000 
(155% of the quota we were asked to 
raise) and the Reconstruction and Ad- 
vance Fund was over the quota nearly 
50%. This Diocese is ready to go for- 
ward, so let's 'Dare to Lead' — 1948 is 
with us, so it's time to look forward not 
backward." 



RECEIVED BY THE DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH 

CAROLINA FROM PARISHES AND MISSIONS 

For The Year 1947 

On Assessment For On Quota For 
Support Of The Diocese Program Of The Churche 

Made Paid PARISHES Accepted Paid 

Asheville, Trinity $ 2,238.95 $ 2,742.12 

Asheville, St. Mary's 516.07 514.07 

Asheville, St. Matthias' 335.43 56.35 

Biltmore, All Souls' 2,242.95 1,829.17 

Brevard, St. Philip's 343.64 203.67 

Flat Rock, St. John's 191.15 217.76 

Fletcher, Calvary 676.73 600.00 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 737.22 811.35 

Hendersonville, St. James' 585.64 640.50 

Hickory, Ascension 590.44 273.25 

Lenoir, St. James' 437.98 516.05 

Lincolnton ,St. Luke's 422.99 288.48 

Marion, St. John's 280.26 281.93 

Morganton, Grace 1,098.00 1,262.52 

Rutherfordton. St. Francis' 661.42 661.42 

Tryon, Holy Cross 1,075.91 1,073.46 

Waynesville, Grace 239.72 243.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 156.77 156.80 

MISSIONS 

Arden, Christ School 79.30 30.00 

Asheville. The Redeemer 46.83 69.41 

Asheville, St. Luke's 28.13 41.21 

Asheville, Trinity Chapel 47.07 48.17 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 76.86 82.65 

Beaver Creek, St. Mary's 19.52 19.52 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's 25.48 37.00 

Black Mountain, St. James 231.78 234.41 

Blowing Rock, Stringfellow M. 56.84 63.44 

Boone, St. Luke's 64.26 64.26 

Canton, St. Andrew's 152.83 81.41 

Cherokee, St. Francis of Assisi 10.00 26.23 

Cullowhee, St. Davdi's 7.93 7.93 

Edneyville, St. Paul's 14.80 21.00 

Franklin. St. Agnes 150.28 170.07 

Franklin, St. Cyprian's 15.25 23.50 

Glen Alpine, St. Paul's 19.52 10.61 

Glendale Springs, Holy Trinity 15.25 20.28 

High Shoals, St. John's 21.19 21.19 

Highlands, Incarnation 129.44 156.25 

Hot Springs, St. John's 14.64 14.64 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 76.86 76.86 

Lincolnton, St. Cyprian's 18.30 

Lincoln, Woodside, Our Saviour 20.16 26.35 

Little Switzerland, Resurrection 30.50 

Morganton, St. Mary's 13.86 66.10 

Morganton, St. Stephen's 13.62 18.00 

Murphy, Messiah 50.66 56.66 

Rutherford, St. Gabriel's 73.36 8.68 

Saluda, Transfiguration 81.74 81.74 

Shelbv, The Redeemer 186.46 186.59 

Sylva, St. John's 7.32 7.32 

Todd, St. iMatthew's 7.93 7.93 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 107.88 122.77 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Asheville, Grace 16.18 15.00 

Blackstone, Mission 6.00 1.40 

Cashiers, Good Shepherd 10.00 10.00 

Dutch Creek. St. Anthony 

Edneyville, St. Peter's 

Lincolnton, St. Paul's 

Lincolnton, St. Stephen's 

Linville, All Saints 24.40 18.00 

Morganton, St. Elizabeth's 

Penland, Good Shepherd 30.50 80.97 

Rutherfordton, Missions 8.44 

Tryon, Good Shepherd 10.07 10.07 

Upward, St. John Baptist 61.00 67.10 

Valle Crucis, St. John Baptist 

TOTAL $14,907.71 $14,476.62 



5 796.07 


$ 736.07 


183.49 


183.49 


119.27 


119.27 


797.47 


797.46 


122.18 


122.18 


67.96 


77.43 


240.00 


240.00 


262.12 


262.20 


208.93 


208.93 


209.93 


209.93 


155.00 


155.00 


150.40 


150.40 


99.65 


99.65 


369.99 


369.99 


235.19 


240.00 


382.55 


385.00 


85.23 


85.23 


55.75 


55.76 


30.00 


30.00 


16.65 


16.65 


12.00 


12.00 


16.74 


16.74 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


82.41 


82.41 


30.00 


30.00 


22.85 


22.85 


54.34 


54.34 


6.00 


6.00 


6.00 


6.00 


10.00 


10.00 


53.43 


53.43 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


45.88 


45.88 


10.00 


10.00 


20.00 


20.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 


20.00 




12.00 


12.00 


10.00 


10.00 


18.01 


18.01 


26.08 


26.08 


10.00 


10.00 


64.16 


64.16 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


10.00 


38.36 


47.25 


12.00 


12.00 


5.00 


5.00 


10.00 


10.00 


12.00 


12.00 


10.00 


10.00 


6.00 




10.00 


10.00 


12.00 


12.00 


$5,345.09 


$5,324.06 




Orphaned by the war, these European children need help and they 
need it NOW. Millions of such children overseas are striving for 
survival. The Episcopal Church is making a nationwide ef- 
fort to raise a million dollars for World Relief through its Presid- 
ing Bishop's Fund. By means of a nationwide radio hookup, the 
administrative head of the Church, Presiding Bishop Henry K. 
Sherrill, will speak to his entire membership in their churches at 
exactly 11:32% A. M., Sunday, February 29. 



The Plan Is A Simple One 



February 29, 1948, is the third Sun- 
day in Lent. The National Council has 
asked each parish and mission to set 
aside this day for a special appeal for 
The Presiding Bishop's Fund for World 
Relief. 

The Presiding Bishop, at the eleven 
o'clock service on February 29 in each 
of our four time zones, will make a radio 
address over a complete nation-wide 
network to members of the Church as 
they are sitting in their pews. His ten 
minute talk will deal with the needs of 
Europe and Asia. He will emphasize 
our responsibility as Christians to fulfill 
those needs. 



Following Bishop Sherrill's address 
and a short talk by the rector, designated 
members of each congregation will pass 
out offering envelopes and pledge cards 
to all present so that gifts may be made 
immediately. 

The special offering will then be taken 
and presented at the altar. 

It must be specially noted: While 
all or most of the million dollars can be 
raised at this one service, nevertheless, 
each parish and mission must be re- 
sponsible for its full share of the quota 
whether or not it is completely raised 
at this time. 



10 



NEWS FROM THE PARISHES 



Gastonia 

St. Mark's had an unusual Christ- 
mas Eve service. The largest congre- 
gation on record for many years 
participated. The carol service was 
supplemented by violin renderings by 
Mr. Leslie 0. McCollum and a solo by 
Miss Jeanne Gregg. 

The Parish House and Church have 
been redecorated inside, and a new 
stoker furnace has been installed in the 
Church. The budget for 1948 has been 
over subscribed. 



Valle Crucis 

At the meeting of the congregation 
of Holy Cross before Christmas, new 
officers of the Mission Committee were 
elected. They are: Miss Rosalind Rags- 
dale of Newland, treasurer, Mrs. James 
Davis, clerk, Mr. Lewis Townsend, Mr. 
Julius Yates and Mr. Malcolm Glovier. 
An additional salary for 1947 of $100 
was voted for the priest-in-charge, and 
it was expected that the 1947 quota 
would be overpaid by a sum in excess 
of $150. A stoker has been installed 
in the rectory. 



Rutherfordton 

St. Francis' recently received a gift 
of #1,000 which has been deposited in 
a special contingency fund for the time 
being. There has also been a recent 
gift of a blue rug which is being used 
to brighten up the Undercroft. 

During the convalescence of the 
Rector, who underwent a tonsillectomy, 
the Rev. H. Boyd Edwards, D. D., and 
the Rev. J. B. Sill held services in St. 
Francis'. 



Morganton 

Grace Church held its annual parish 
supper and business meeting the eve- 
ning of January 21st with 114 persons 
attending. Mr. Hal M. Walton, Mr. 
A. B. Stoney, Mr. Sam Teague, and 
Mr. William A. Leslie were elected to 
a three year term on the Vestry. They 



fill the vacancy caused by the expiration 
of the three years service on the Vestrv 
of Lt. Col. C. M. Walton, Mr. Dewev 
Oxford, Mr. B. A. Jacob, III, and Mr. 
R. M. Starrett. 

A resolution of thanks to the Rectory 
Building Committee was voted over the 
protest of Col. C. M. Walton, Chairman 
of the Committee. Col. Walton pointed 
out that the Building Committee had 
simply gone ahead and done its duty as 
is appeared to them, and that perhaps 
the following year a resolution of con- 
demnation of the Committee might be 
passed! "We went ahead with the 
building of the new rectory, and you all 
will now have to pay for it!", he said, 
amidst roars of applause and laughter. 
Other members of the Building Com- 
mittee were Dr. P. N. DeVere, Mrs. 
A. B. Stoney, Mr. R. M. Starrett, and 
Mr. H. L. Riddle, Jr. 

Dr. DeVere. Secretary of the Vestry, 
read a letter from Mr. B. A. Jacob, III, 
Every-Member-Canvass Chairman, in 
which it was stated that the total parish 
goal of $8,792.69 was over-subscribed 
by #146.47 with 141 pledges, and that 
#1,542.68 of this amount was pledged 
for the "Red side" or Church's Program. 

In his closing remarks the Rector 
thanked the congregation for providing 
him and his family with such a lovely 
new home into which he had just moved 
the week before, and also expressed ap- 
preciation for the "pounding" given 
that day by the ladies of the parish. He 
expressed the hope that the material 
progress of the parish and its numerical 
growth was a real indication of an in- 
ward and spiritual contact with our 
Lord without which all the rest is mere 
mockery. 



Other Places 

As far as the Highland Churchman 
knows, nothing newsworthy has hap- 
pened in the Convocation of Asheville 
parishes and missions. 



M 



Question Box 

By The Rev. J . P. Burke 



1. Do you think the matter of chang- 
ing diocesan boundaries should have 
been brought before our Special Con- 
vention? 

Yes. The Standing Committee had 
called the Convention for the sole pur- 
pose of electing a Bishop, but, between 
the time the notice was sent out and 
the Convention was assembled many 
communications had been received to 
the effect that the Convention should 
not be held in view of the boundary 
discussion. Since the Standing Com- 
mittee had called the Convention, it had 
the right to ask the Convention to listen 
to these communications. The Con- 
vention voted to hear them. 

The boundary question is a very 
important question that will probably 
arise again and again. The hearing of 
these letters was a contribution to ed- 
ucation on the matter. Nevertheless, 
since there was no communication from 
any officially responsible person in the 
Diocese of North Carolina, the oldest 



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and largest diocese, as to what that 
diocese was prepared to do or not do, 
and, since not one of the letters proposed 
anything for our diocese to do except 
wait, or, possibly make a survey, I feel 
that our Convention was eminently cor- 
rect in proceeding with the Order of the 
Day. 

2. What do you think of the Con- 
vention? 

The total number of delegates was 
the largest in the history of our diocese. 
In my opinion, there was more interest 
manifested, more apparent determina- 
tion to go forward than in past years. 
The forward looking speech of the Chair- 
man of the Department of Finance was, 
I think, typical of the way most of that 
fine body of men felt. Many have told 
me that there was no undue or unfair 
pressure for any candidate. Trinity 
Parish was most hospitable. We made 
a wise choice of a leader. 



BOOKS FOR LENTEN READING 

In addition to the Presiding Bishop's 
Book for Lent, Revive Thy Church, 
Beginning With Me, by the Rev. Sam- 
uel M. Shoemaker, the National Council 
has prepared a reading list keyed to the 
theme of Evangelism. Listed are To- 
morrozu is Here, by K. S. Latourette 
and W. Richey Hogg; The Bible and 
the Common Reader, by Mary Ellen 
Chase; The Story of the New Testa- 
ment, by E. J. Goodspeed; A Plain 
Mans Life of Jesus, by A. D. Martin; 
The Religion of the Prayer Book, by 
Walden Pell and P. M. Dawley; The 
Divine Commission, by Frank E. Wil- 
son; The Episcopal Church, Its Faith 
and Order, by George Hodges, and 
What Does The Episcopal Church 
Stand For? by Norman Pittenger. 



In case of serious illness call your 
Rector immediately. Please make sure 
that he learns about it directly from 
you. Every priest of the Church right- 
ly wants to know of the illness of his 
people and should be informed as soon 
as the Doctor. 



12 



The Best Job In The World 



By the Rev. Wood B. Carper, Jr. 

Rector, The Church of the Holy Spirit, 

Lake Forest 

Ed. Note: Mr. Carper was formerly 
Rector of Calvary Church, Fletcher 

As I write this, there lies on my desk 
the National Council's list of needs in 
overseas missions: "Priests for Wran- 
gell, Sitka, Tanacross and Menana- 
Alaska; a priest for Cuba; three priests 
for Honolulu; a priest for Liberia; three 
priests for the Canal Zone, one Spanish 
speaking; a priest for Puerto Rico." 
Almost every week I receive an inquiry 
about a priest for a parish, for a mission, 
for an institution, for a prep school, for 
a college, here in the United States. 

Hundreds of places, where there is at 
the present time support for the work, 
remain vacant because there are not 
enough men to go around. And in addi- 
tion there is the "field which is the 
world, white for the harvest." Men 
wanted, men needed. Where are they? 

Well, they are already here, baptized, 
confirmed, in high school and in college, 
but they aren't going into the ministry 
in either sufficient numbers or with 
adequate personal endowment. The law, 
medicine, business, theater, publishing 
and all the rest of the professions are 
getting not only the cream but the bulk 
of the crop. 

This situation will continue until: 
first, the parishes of the land wake up 
to their responsibility to recruit for the 
ministry, and second, the seminaries re- 
ceive enough support to train these who 
are recruited. 

Waiting For A "Call" 

"Recruiting for the ministry" is per- 
haps a crude phrase, but it has advan- 
tages. The average persons thinks too 
much of a "call' as a mysterious voice 
speaking in the inward recesses of the 
soul. Hearing no such voice he con- 
cludes the ministry is not for him. The 
only "call" necessary is to hear God's 



perennial "Who will go for us?" as that 
come in every recognition of human 
need. Any young man who is convinc- 
ed of the truth of Christianity and who 
sees a world going to hell because it 
rejects that truth, can offer himself to 
the Church. Then the Church, through 
her bishops, standing committeees and 
examining chaplains, can see that the 
volunteer is prepared as well as possible 
for God to use him. 

And how many ways He can use the 
minister! In the infinitely varied life 
of any parish — among the children, with 
the aged, in all sorts of homes, in mom- 
ents of joy and moments of heartbreak, 
at the sick bed, at the wedding feast, at 
life's beginning and at its earthly end- 



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in the following fields: Business Ad- 
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13 



THE conit SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis Garrett Conant 
Headmaster 




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ing; not a day or an hour going by 
without being engaged in considering 
how God's salvation can be brought to 
God's children; a job calling for every 
bit of ingenuity, of administrative abili- 
ty, of learning, of sympathy, of under- 
standing, of strength. 

No other man in our communities is 
so free to move about, among friends 
in every segment of society, entering 
any door. No other man is so univer- 
sally welcome. No other man has the 
inheritance of trust and respect that 
even our partly pagan land gives him. 
The idea that the minister is somehow 
insulated and isolated from life can be 
held only by a fool. The average min- 
ister sees more of human life in one 
week than most people do in a month, 
save perhaps doctors and lawyers — and 
observing bus drivers. And I should 
guess he sees more of life's variety than 
either the doctors and lawyers — and 
bus drivers. 

Looking For Variety? 

This rich experience can be had in 
any parish or mission in the United 
States. If foreign sights and sounds 
appeal, there is the current list of need- 
ed priests in lands across the seas. If 
specialized work is wanted, there are the 
chaplaincies in all kinds of institutions, 
in the army and navy, in new industrial 
situations; there are jobs in teaching, in 
art, in music. What other profession 
can offer such variety, such a multitude 
of ways in which to use one's talents 
for God and for humanity? 

Of course one is not likely to get rich. 
Neither is one likely to starve. It might 
be remarked that one is not likely to 
get rich in any profession in these times, 
and that all too often making a lot of 
money isn't worth the sacrifice it re- 
quires. But the ministry offers so much 
in personal satisfaction that the stan- 
dard of money simply doesn't apply. 



HAVE YOU SENT IN 

YOUR CHURCH PLEDGE? 

HELP THE CHURCH 

TO HELP OTHERS 



14 



MAN WHO MADE RADIO FORTUNE 
HEADS TO HUMBLE PASTOR POST 

By Harmon W . Nichols 

James Wesley McClain, who earned 
#500,000 in radio as the original "Dr. 
I. Q." and gave up his career to study 
for the ministry, recently headed for 
his new parish in Texas — with his last 
#35 in his pocket. 

The Rev. Mr. McClain's ambition is 
to become a country parson, and as 
such, he never can hope to make more 
than $2400 a year. 

"Not Sorry" Over Change 

He was among 19 students who knelt 
and received diplomas recently in the 
little chapel at the Seabury-Western 
Theological Seminary. 

"I'm not at all sorry I left a fat job 
before the microphone to appear behind 
the pulpit," he said. "All right, so I'm 
broke. I don't consider that I threw 
my money away. Part of it paid for 
my training here. I have a lot of ex- 
pensive movie equipment — which is my 
hobby. And I have a library worth 



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Biltmore, N. C. 



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McClain, his attractive wife, Doris, 
and three children, ranging in age from 
8 years to 8 months, left town imme- 
diately. He will take over the East- 
land, Texas, mission. . . . Eastland is a 
town of 4500. He says he will feel right 
at home. Although born in Kentucky, 
he has been a resident of Texas during 
most of his 35 years. 

'T am a convert to the Episcopal 
Church," McClain said. "I like people. 
I like country people. That's why I 
want to devote the rest of my life to 
small town missions. I have no am- 



bition to be elevated to a higher station 
in the church. I'm as high now as I'll 
ever be — and I'm satisfied." 

SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stoae, President 

An Zpiscopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 1 2th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic course* fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — -Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



16 



tEMtg^lanb 
Cgurdpnan 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



MARCH, 1948 



NO. \i 



HP* 




(Eljurrljman 

Box 55 Valle Cnicis, N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville, North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, SOc a year. 

The Bishop, 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mer. 



EDITORIAL 

By the time this editorial is read, the 
longest part of the Lenten season will 
be over and our minds will be turning to 
the joy of Easter. In this issue some- 
thing of the difficulty of keeping our 
minds on Lent alone is seen by our 
necessity to print both a Lenten medi- 
tation by Father Lambert and the Pre- 
siding Bishop's Easter Message. We 
are sure that this is a difficulty that 
assaults us all in one form or another 
in our Church life. Although we are 
called upon by our Church to exercise 
greater self-discipline, abstinence, and 
spiritual study, we are constantly being 
lured away by pleasures of the moment 
or anticipation of joys to come. If we 
have fallen short this Lent, or find our- 
selves growing weaker, let us use the 
remaining time to the utmost for the 
strengthening and refreshing of our 
souls. 



It made reference to a tendency that is 
not limited to Church affairs for prob- 
lems to be referred to committees where 
they languished. Let us hope that posi- 
tive action will result from the work of 
committees that are being organized in 
the three dioceses. 



DIOCESAN LINES 

A clerical trade paper known as PAR- 
SONS had something to say about re- 
alignment of our Dioceses in the state. 



Diocese of Western North 

Carolina Thanksgiving 

Receipts 

As Of February 17, 1948 

Arden, Christ School $ 36.00 

Asheville, Trnity 257.28 

Asheville, St. Mary's 21.25 

Bat Cave, Transfiguration 10.80 

Bessemer City, St. Andrew's __ 2.00 

Biltmore, All Souls' 286.32 

Black Mountain, St. James' __ 72.50 

Boone, St. Lukes' 17.50 

Brevard, St. Philips' 56.50 

Chunn's Cove, St. Lukes' 16.00 

Fletcher, Calvary 25.00 

Franklin, St. Agnes' 53.20 

Gastonia, St. Mark's 638.84 

Haw Creek, Trinity 10.00 

Hendersonville, St. James 109.00 

Hickory, Ascension 275.00 

High Shoals, St. John's 10.00 

Highlands, Incarnation 20.10 

Legerwood, Chapel of Rest 5.00 

Lenoir, St. James' 42.54 

Lincolnton, (Woodside) 

Our Saviour 10.00 

Lincolnton, St. Lukes' 100.47 

Marion, St. John's 36.00 

Morganton, Grace 269.20 

Murphy, Messiah 9.70 

Penland, Good Shepherd 6.29 

Rutherfordton, St. Francis 70.50 

Saluda, Transfiguration 62.84 

Shelby, Redeemer 4.00 

Tryon, Holy Cross 269.82 

Upward, St. John's ^6.00 

Waynesville, Grace 30.00 

Wilkesboro, St. Paul's 73.82 

Valle Crucis, Holy Cross 29.92 

Women's Auxiliary of the 

Diocese of W. N. C. 50.00 



TOTAL £2,993.39 



Lent and Spiritual Unity 



By The Rev. Peter Lambert, 0. G. S. 

In the recurrent cycle of our life which is of God, during this holy season, we 
pray in the words of one of the collects that we "may enter with joy upon the 
meditation of those mighty acts'' of our Lord's incarnate life upon earth wherein 
the creative and redemptive purpose of God is revealed and effected. They are 
the acts in which the Church acknowledges the life and light and love of God 
incarnate once for all in Christ, and thereupon offered to the world in the fellowship 
of the Holy Ghost. By the mystery of Thy Holy Incarnation: ... by Thy Bap- 
tism, Fasting and Temptation; by Thine Agony and Bloody Sweat; by Thy Cross 
and Passion; by Thy Precious Death and Burial; . . . and goal to which our Lord 
lived: by which He triumphed and reigns "by Thy Glorious Resurrection and 
Ascension, and by the coming of the Holy Ghost." By this "full sufficient Sacri- 
fice" and Oblation of Himself He has given us an access to the Eternal Father to 
Whom in His Humanity by the very virtue of our Baptism we must offer ourselves 
continually to God. This love and abandon may bring strange suffering to the 
soul whereby we are purified from self by allowing Jesus Himself to be our prayer 
that we may be His. 

Some ten years ago a spiritual movement was brought to light by means of 
which Christians of diverse traditions could join together in our Lord's prayer 
''that all may be one" in Him. There is no organization, intentionally, so that 
the Spirit will be allowed free access among the many Christians throughout the 
world of every race and nation; Anglican, Orthodox, Old Catholics, Protestants and 
Roman Catholics who have indicated their participation may continue in this 
practice which is simple in itself, but of a far reaching theological and spiritual 
significance. 

It is not amiss for us during this Lent and emphasis on Evangelism not only 
to consider but for us all to grow into this participation of our continual intercession 
which He makes for us at the right hand of God (Rom. 8:34), that we may the 
better be able to fulfill our life's work. The suggestion is that each individual soul 
"abandon itself wholly to the prayer of Jesus," by which is designated the prayer 
which our Saviour is continually addressing to His Father, of which the intention 
is sometimes known to us and sometimes remains mysterious to us. It is a question 
of allowing a "free coursing" or a "free passage" through us of the eternal prayer 
of Jesus, in order to allow "Jesus Himself to become our prayer," to unite us to 
the life of prayer of Jesus. This will obviously imply, a continual oblation and 
sacrifice on our part and a veritable baptism of fire kindled by the saying "for 
their sakes I sanctify myself." Jesus prays differently in each individual soul, 
but to "plunge in the depths of His life of prayer is heaven," and whatever may be 
the interior suffering of His prayer, "even the prayer and agony in the garden, this 
suffering is still peace, as walking in the way of the Cross will prove. Before our 
Lord left the uppper room He gave full utterance to His Life that His own may 
be one, as He and the Father are one in Their Love, whom the Father has given 
him who are distinguished by the love they have one for the other who are united 
in His life of prayer. In His love is all Truth as all life. To love is to worship, 
and the "hour cometh . . . when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in 
Spirit and in truth, for the Father seeketh such to worship Him." In our days the 
Father seeks these souls who will abandon themselves little by little, gradually and 
continually to the Blessed Trinity in union with the prayer of Jesus. 

3 



As Jesus prays in us unhindered by us, His prayer is Himself and He is Himself 
His prayer. "In Him all fulness dwelleth." He is the sole salvation of men — "All 
aid given on earth is given through Him." He is the fulfilment of the vocation, 
in the real sense of the word, to each soul. 

Such a surrender and oblation is possible to all souls whatever their exterior 
circumstances. This offering of ourselves, our souls and bodies, is a reasonable, 
holy and living sacrifice, satisfies all the inspirations that a soul can receive, for 
the infinite prayer of Jesus contains in itself an infinity of divers attractions and 
complements. It unifies all life, every effort, all suffering, all work and all prayer. 
This oblation presupposes a vision. The vision is of the desire of the Father, that 
all offering themselves offer themselves to the blessed Trinity in union with the 
prayer of Jesus. 

All those who worship thus are one, and this unity which begins here will be 
consummated hereafter. "Those whom thou hast given me, I will that they be 
where I am, that they may be with me." Go then with faith, go in Jesus in the 
way of the cross that finding it none other than the way of life and of peace we 
will literally live in Him who is continually before the throne of the Father adoring 
and adored in the power of His Resurrection. 



» 



Advance Information About Kanuga 



The Board of Managers at their midwinter meeting found it necessary to make 
the following increases in rates for the Conferences and Camps for the coming 
summer season: 

Woman's Auxiliary of Western North Carolina — June 3 and 4 $ 5.00 

Retreat for Women — June 7-10 10.00 

Midget Camp (Girls 10 and 11)— June 12-25 30.00 

Cub Camp (Boys 10 and 11)— June 26-July 9 30.00 

Junior Conference — June 12-25 32.00 

Young People's Conference — June 26-July 9 32.00 

Boys Camp— July 10-August 21 150.00 

Adult Conference — July 10-14: 

1 in a room 42.25 

2 in a room each 36.25 

College Conference — July 10-24: 

Same rates as Adult Conference 
Clerk School— July 12-24: 

1 in a room 32.25 

2 in a room each 22.25 

Children under 10 per dav 1.75 

Children 10-12 per day 2.00 

Children 13-15 — same as adults without registration fee 

No maid service or linens will be furnished for the Adult, College or Clergy 
Conferences. Those attending these periods may rent linen and blankets at 
Kanuga for $2.00 per week, or blankets only for $1.00 per week. No advance 
request necessary. Families bringing maids will be charged the same rate as 
adults, less registration fee. 

Additional information will be given in the booklets ready for distribution 
about March 1. 



The Good News of Eastertide 



Dean Inge has rightly told us that the 
Gospel is not first of all Good Advice 
but Good News. The first disciples 
proclaimed an event of the greatest 
significance. "He is risen." In the en- 
tire history of mankind there is no news 
to compare with this — for here is a fact 
which has to do with God, eternal life 
and the destiny of every child of God. 
To be sure we have known this all our 
lives. It is a story which is almost two 
thousand years old and therefore may 
be presumed to have no news value 
today. But there is such a thing as hav- 
ing ears and yet not hearing. Some- 
times a familiar truth comes to have 
immediate and vital significance. Death 
is as old as life, yet when death touches 
our own. it is a new experience. Sin is 
venerable but when we are gripped by 
temptation, it is a battle to be fought 
and won. So it is with the Good News 
of Eastertide. If we could only grasp 
its meaning for our world and for our- 
selves, all things would be made new. 
Selfishness would give way, the burden 
of sorrow and of despair would be lifted. 
Men would live as the children of God. 
Here then is Good News. The Lord 
is risen. He is risen indeed! 

Henry K. Sherrill, 
Presiding Bishop. 



PROOF READING ERROR 

Trinity Church, Asheville, paid its 
full 1947 Assessment of $796.07, and 
did not underpay it by $60 as reported 
in the figures shown in the February 
issue of the Highland Churchman. 



THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 
OFFERING 

Mr. M. D. Whisnant, superintendent 
of the Thompson Orphanage, reports 
that as of February 23, 1948, the sum 
of $2,993.39 has been received from the 
Diocese. He has asked that the appre- 
ciation of the Orphanage be expressed 
to all church members through the 
Highland Churchman. 



News Editors In Each 
Convocation 

By reason of some rather glaring 
omissions of parish news items by the 
editor, it has been brought to his atten- 
tion that some sure method of gathering 
news should be followed. Our predeces- 
sor in the anxious seat had appointed 
news editors in each convocation. The 
Rev. Charles G. Leavell is news editor 
for the Convocation of Morganton; all 
news from parishes and missions in this 
Convocation should be sent to him be- 
for the 20th of each month. In the 
Convocation of Asheville, news should 
be sent to The Rev. Mark Jenkins, 
Fletcher, whose name appears on our 
masthead as the assistant to the editor. 
It will be of immeasurable help to have 
all news come in from these two sources. 
And may we remind the parishes and 
missions again that the things which 
happen in each congregation are of in- 
terest to others in the Diocese. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEE APPOINTED 

The Standing Committee has auth- 
orized its president, the Rev. Mark Jen- 
kins, to appoint a committee of three 
priests and three laymen to meet with 
similar committees of the two other 
North Carolina dioceses to study the 
matter of realignment. The Rev. Mr. 
Jenkins shall be chairman of this special 
committee. 



MITE BOX OFFERINGS 

The annual services of Presentation 
for the Lenten Mite Box Offerings will 
take place in both Convocations shortly 
after Easter. In the Convocation of 
Asheville the service will take place at 
Calvary Church, Fletcher, on the second 
Sunday after Easter at 3 P. M. In the 
Convocation of Morganton, the service 
will take place on the second Saturday 
after Easter in Grace Church, Morgan- 
ton. 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



Rutherfordton 

Lenten services in St. Francis', Ruth- 
erfordton, are being held on Tuesday 
and Wednesday night, with guest 
preachers on Tuesdays. 

At the 4 P. M. Lenten services on 
Fridays the Woman's Auxiliary Study 
Class is being conducted by the Rector, 
the Rev. Ralph K. Webster. The study 
class this year is taking the form of a 
"Prayer Clinic" dealing with "The Art 
of Prayer", "Kinds of Prayer", and 
"Examples of Prayer", and devotional 
reading. As source for the latter the 
recent Church Congress booklet "The 
Way of Renewal" is being used. 

St. Francis' Church School, excepting 
Sundays of extreme cold and heavy 
snowfall, is showing steady growth. 
From a low of four or five pupils it has 
grown to a present enrollment of 40. 
There are four classes. The Rector 
serves as Superintendent, and the fol- 
lowing women are on the faculty: Mrs. 
Charles Cold, Mrs. B. H. Sumner, Mrs. 
R. M. Hudgins, and Mrs. Troy Scroggs. 

Laymen of St. Francis are active in 
the affairs of their community. Mr. F. 
A. Towe is serving as Rutherford Coun- 
ty Red Cross Roll Call Chairman with 
Mr. B. H. Sumner heading up the pub- 
licity phase of the Roll Call for 1948. 



Hickory 

The Y.P.S.L. of Ascension, Hickory, 
recently presented the Parish with a 
handsome new Church Flag. Another 
gift to the Parish were choir and pew 
editions of the 1940 Hymnals presented 
by Mr. Vernon Lackey. In keeping 
with new members acquired and new 
musical heights attained, the choir and 
acolytes now have new vestments. 

Lenten services are being held on 
Thursday nights, with occasional guest 
preachers. The Rector, the Rev. Rob- 
ert B. Campbell, is preaching a Sunday 
series of Lenten Season sermons on 
"The Lord's Prayer." 



Diocesan Camp 

Young people of the Diocese, between 
the ages of 13 and 24, will once again 
have the opportunity of being together 
at Patterson School for another glorious 
week in June. The dates for the Young 
Churchmen's Diocesan Camp have been 
set for June 6th-12th. Other details 
will be released in the next issue of The 
Highland Churchman. The cost is to 
be #7.00, #1.00 of which is registration 
fee. 

In past years the Camp has been 
usually crowded beyond the capacity of 
the School, so that late registration could 
not be taken. Just to be sure, we sug- 
gest that you send in your name, age, 
and address, together with one dollar 
registration fee, to the 1948 Director, 
the Rev. C. G. Leavell, 301 S. King St., 
Morganton, N. C. An official registra- 
tion blank will be in a later issue of 
The Highland Churchman, but is not 
necessary for early registrations. 



CLERGY, LAY DELEGATES TO 
DIOCESAN CONVENTION, MAY 

13th-14th: Accommodations in Mor- 
ganton are limited but available by mak- 
ing reservations through Mr. W. D. 
Mclntyre, Caldwell Hotel, Morganton, 
N. C. Tourist homes, hotels, and Grace 
Church parishioners have been asked 
not to accept guests unless and until 
they clear through Mr. Mclntyre, We 
ask all delegates to cooperate with us; 
only thus can we handle the large Con- 
vention certain to assemble. Whatever 
your plans are, whether you want hotel 
or tourist home accommodation, paro- 
chial hospitality, are staying with friends 
inside or outside the parish, or plan to 
drive back home, make such plans 
known to Mr. Mclntyre. 



By action of the Standing Committee 
at its meeting February 6th the election 
of a Bishop is to be part of the order of 
business at the regular Diocesan Con- 






vention. Nominations are to be made 
from the floor, and facts on candidates 
presented by those who nominate or 
second nominations, according to such 
special rules as the Convention itself 
may adopt. 

In order to hasten ordinary business 
it was suggested that reports of Com- 
mittees, Departments, and Commissions, 
wherever possible, be sumitted simply 
by title, without comment. The Dioces- 
an Convention meets May 13th and 14th 
in Grace Church, Morganton. 



St. John's Marion 

Several months ago a Men's Club 
was organized in St. John's Parish, with 
Mr. S. P. Dameron as Chairman. What 
began as an experiment has grown into 
a live organization consisting of twenty- 
five members under his able leadership. 
Quarterly meetings are held in the Com- 
munity Building, lacking a Parish 
House, where supper is served, and an 
address by special speakers, among them 
Bishop Gribbin and Fr. Rhys, of St. 
James', Black Mountain. At the last 
meeting, held on December 1st, instead 



of a special speaker, Mr. George Wiese, 
assisted by Mr. Donald Van Cleve, ex- 
hibited the Patterson School film, "Hap- 
py Valley", which all present pronounc- 
ed, "Excellent!" On account of our 
growing Sunday School it was necessary 
to enlarge the two rooms on either side 
of the Church at a cost of over fifteen 
hundred dollars, most of which was sub- 
scribed by members of the congregation. 
The Vestry tried to buy some land ad- 
jacent to the Church on which to build 
a Parish House, but the owner refused 
to sell, so the enlarging of the rooms was 
the next best thing to do. 

Among other activities of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary is their annual Spaghetti 
Supper, for which they are famous in 
Marion, and served over two hundred 
people. This was held in the Commu- 
nity Building. 

In August, the Rector presented a 
class of four men and one woman to the 
Bishop for confirmation, and another 
class of five men on December 11th, the 
last time, we regret to say, that the 
Bishop visited the Parish as Bishop of 
the Diocese. 



NORTH CAROLINA EPISCOPAL 

COLLEGE STUDENTS MEET 

IN RALEIGH 

The 11th Annual Xorth Carolina 
Episcopal College Students Conference, 
composed of students from the 3 dioces- 
es of North Carolina, was held February 
6th through 8th in Raleigh, N. C, at 
the Church of the Good Shepherd and 
Christ Chruch. The meeting was at- 
tended by approximately 50 students 
from Duke University, University of 
North Carolina, N. C. State, The Wom- 
an's College of the University of North 
Carolina, St. Augustine's, Wake Forest, 
Flora MacDonald, E. C. T. C, Appala- 
chian State, St. Mary's, and Campbell 
College. 

The Conference theme, "The Chal- 
lenge of Christianity," was presented 
and discussed by the Conference leader, 
The Rev. M. George Henry of Char- 
lotte, N. C. The discussion groups 
which followed were: Canterbury Club 



Clinic, led by the Rev. George Work- 
man, Episcopal Chaplain of Duke Uni- 
versity; The Opportunity of Lent, led 
by the Rev. Ray Holder, Rector of 
Christ Church, Raleigh; The Church 
and Social Action, by Dr. H. L. Trigg, 
President of St. Augustine's; Personal 
Evangelism, the Rev. I. Harding 
Hughes, Chaplain of St. Mary's, and 
Prayer led by the Rev. F. Craighill 
Brown of Southern Pines. 

A resolution was passed by the Con- 
ference suggesting a partial solution to 
the problem of inadequate leadership in 
student work. The resolution suggest- 
ed that the National Council and the 
Church Society for College work spon- 
sor annually, for each Province, a one- 
week leadership training course for Can- 
terbury Club officers and other students 
active in the work of the Church. It 
may well be that such training — as is 
now offered at Lake Junaluska, N. C, 
for Methodist leadership and other such 



camps — will prove fruitful ground for 
the enlistment of professional workers 
in our Church. Since no training in 



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College work is now available for those 
clergy going into campus positions, we 
suggest that professional assistance be 
offered simultaneously with the Student 
Program to those clergymen already in 
such jobs. 

The delegates elected as their new 
officers for the Conference: C. Charles 
Vache, U. N. C, President. Ruth 
Adams, St. Augustine's, First Vice-Pre- 
sident. Steve Flanagan, N. C. State, 
second Vice-President. Jack Howard, 
E. C. T. C.j Secretary. Alex Kizer of 
Wake Forest as Treasurer. Ann Forbes, 
W. C. U. N. C, Delegate-at-Large. The 
Rev. George Workman was elected as 
the new advisor to the Conference. 

On the last evening of the Confer- 
ence the Annual Banquet was held, the 
main address being given by the Rt. 
Rev. Edwin A. Penick, Bishop of the 
Diocese of North Carolina. 

The Conference closed Sunday morn- 
ing with services at the Church of the 
Good Shepherd at which the conference 
leader delivered the sermon. 



The Church Pension Fund 

And Its Sudsidiaries 
Administered For the Benefit of the Church 

THE CHURCH HYMNAL CORPORATION 

Publishers of The Hymnal; Book of Common Prayer; A Prayer Book 
for Soldiers and Sailors; Book of Offices for Certain Occasions; Stowe's 
Clerical Directory. 

CHURCH LIFE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost insurance and annuity contracts available to the clergy, lay 
officials and active lay workers o fthe Church, either voluntary or paid, 
and their immediate families. 

THE CHURCH FIRE INSURANCE CORPORATION 

Low cost fire and windstorm insurance on property owned by or closely 
affiliated with the Church, and on the residences and personal property 
of the clergy. 

Further information available by addressing any of the above at 
20 Exchange Place New York 5, N. Y. 



Young Churchmen's News 



By Helen Elizabeth Thomas 

St. Andrew's, Bessemer City 

The young people at St. Andrew's, 
Bessemer City, have had a Christmas 
party, as well as a Feast of Lights Pag- 
eant. Before Christmas, they had a 
service of confirmation, at which time 
Miss Dorothy Shelton from Gastonia 
was confirmed. The young people from 
Gastonia were present for this service, 
at which the Bishop officiated. 



St. James', Hendersonville 

I have just had a letter from Pattie 
Stonham, one of the young people of the 
St. James League. She has appointed 
herself reporter from her church, and 
has been very faithful in sending me 
the news. If only more of you would 
take -it upon yourselves to do this. Be- 
fore Christmas, the young people of St. 
James had a square dance, and the 
groups from Fletcher, Bat Cave, Edney- 
ville and Hendersonville attended. Re- 
freshments were served and various 
games were also enjoyed during the ev- 
ening. The Hendersonville group also 
had a Christmas Tree party for the 
children of the Sunday School. They 
also gave the Feast of Lights Pageant, 
which was well attended. 



Trinity, Asheville 

The time of meeting of the Trinity 
group has been changed from Sunday 
evenings to Friday evenings. The group 
meets in the Church at 7:30 for a devo- 
tional service and program, after which 
they adjourn to the parish hall for danc- 
ing and pingpong. The mothers of the 
group take turns about preparing sand- 
wiches and hot chocolate to serve at 9 
o'clock, and the young people pay 15 
cents for refreshments. The programs 
have been very interesting, and attend- 
ance has increased to approximately 30 
who come regularly every Friday. 

On Tuesday, December 23, they had 
a formal dance for all members, includ- 



ing the ones who were home from school 
for the holidays. There were 300 at 
this dance, which was a huge success. 
They have also participated in the 
Christmas Story Pageant, and are send- 
ing boxes to CARE regularly. 



Grace, Morganton 

The fellowship activity at Grace 
Church has run largely to square danc- 
ing in the parish house of late, with a 
dance planned for young married 
couples before Lent. This group meets 
every first and third Sunday evening of 
each month, and encourages attendance 
at the regular Church services, where 
the young people help in the Sunday 
School, sing in the choir, and help watch 
after children in the nursery during the 
1 1 o'clock service. For Christmas, they 
wrapped gifts for local missions and 
packed candy. 

On Youth Sunday, various members 
of the league took part in the reading 
of Morning Prayer. They have been 
meeting jointly with the Presbyterian 
Young People, on the fifth Sunday in 
the month. Present group leaders are 
Misses Avis Ann Oehlbeck and Grace 
Jahn, and counsellors are Mrs. L. W. 
Oehlbeck and Mrs. William Kirksey, 
each being assigned to give special help 
to one of the groups. The groups and 
an Auxiliary Chapter alternate in serv- 
ing supper at each meeting. 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVILLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration. Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1214. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



9 



THE MUTT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis Garrett Conant 
Headmaster 



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Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



You used the term "Hidden Isolation- 
ism" in your sermon. What do you 
mean by it? 

I mean what Mrs. Vera M. Dean 
meant when she wrote in a paper on 
"American Foreign Policy" as follows: 
"We pay constant lip-service to the 
ideals of the UN. But like other nations 
in this period of transition from nation- 
alism to internationalism, while we 
speak internationally, our automatic re- 
flexes are still in the direction of nation- 
al action. And we cannot but notice 
what might be described as 'hidden 
isolationism' in the statements of those 
who, for example, declare that we must 
aid Europe, but promptly add such 
qualification as: 'must we really help 
them that much? Can we afford to 
help them? Are the Europeans work- 
ing hard enough themselves, or are they 
taking us for suckers? Must the United 
States always play the role of Santa 
Claus?'' After political isolationism is 
dead "hidden isolationism" can hang on. 

Must we begin all of our diocesan con- 
ventions with a celebration of the Holy 
Communion? 

No. The canons do not require it. 
The canon simply says: "The Eccle- 
siastical Authority shall appoint and 
order the opening service, and all other 



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10 



religious services of the Convention, sub- 
ject, in the absence of the Bishop, to 
modification by the Convention itself." 
Some think that due to late arrivals and 
impending business the Holy Commun- 
ion should be held at an earlier hour in 
the Church where the Convention is to 
be held; while others think that the 
service should always immediately pre- 
cede the opening. What do you think? 

Why is a parish entitled to three lay 
delegates to a Convention and just one 
clerical delegate? 

If a parish employs more than one 
clergyman in canonical residence, they 
can vote. I do not know why there are 
more lay delegates than clerical. Our 
local Lutheran minister tells me that 
their parishes have just one lay and one 
clerical delegate. In our General Con- 
ventions we have four lay and four 
clerical delegates from each diocese. I 
believe, however, that our diocese is in 
accord with all the others in our Church 
on this matter. 

Why do we have to wait so long to 



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g'fecZ and consecrate a successor to a 
Bishop? 

Canonical requirements. This is a 
good question, however. It has already 
been suggested that a Committee of the 
House of Bishops be allowed to act 
upon the resignation of a Bishop instead 
of waiting until the House of Bishops 
meets. The canonical requirements will 
probably be shortened and made more 
in accord with modern business practice. 



SAINT MARK'S, GASTONIA, N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner. Rector 






Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Episcopal School for Girl6 owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression— 1 loim 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



12 



TMfrtgJjlanb 
CTjurcJman 

The Official Publication of the Diocese of Western North Carolina 




VOL. XVIII 



APRIL, 1948 



NO. 12 "(I 




dUjurrtftnan 

Box 55 Voile Crucis. N. C. 

Published by the Department of Promo- 
tion of the Diocese of Western North 
Carolina, monthly except January and 
September. 

Entered as second-class matter April 19, 
1943, at the Post Office at Asheville. North 
Carolina, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Printed by The Miller Printing Com- 
pany. 

Price Sc per copy, SOc a year. 

The Bishop, 

The Diocesan Treasurer, Mr. Wm. M. 
Redwood, 20 Cedarcliff Road, Biltmore 
Forest, Asheville. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

The Rev. W. C. Leach Editor 

The Rev. Mark Jenkins Assistant 

Mr. William F. Toms Bus. Mgr. 

Robert Putnam Adv. Mgr. 



Mr. Redwood's Open 
Letter 

Facing the editorial page is a master- 
ul letter from Mr. Redwood. We are 
sure he is as sorry to have been forced 
to write it as we are to feel the strong 
necessity of printing it. For in Mr. 
Redwood's charitable and understanding 
letter, there is a stern indictment of 
carelessness, ignorance and a narrow 
parochialism which afflicts us in this 
diocese. Proof that these sins exist is 
contained in the statement that some 
pay "just when it suits them" and that 
others "pay no more attention to our 
'please remit' requests than if they were 
no obligation whatever." 

Moreso than ever before, this is no 
time when the vital matter of steward- 
ship can be shrugged off lightly. There 
is much consideration on the part of the 
National Council of whether or not we 
are worthy of receiving aid; it does not 
support our position that we are when 
we have to own up to the fact that there 
seem to be many who are willing to ac- 



cept "free grace" without assuming any 
responsibility. If we do not meet our 
obligations, how are we going to uphold 
the hands of those who contend that 
this diocese is the one in the state which 
shows the greatest potentialities for 
growth? And finally, it should be re- 
membered that any man who is elected 
bishop of this diocese will be sure to 
scrutinize out financial record very care- 
fully. What he sees there may play a 
large part in his decision to accept or 
decline his election. 

The May issue of The Highland 
Churchman, which will go to press on 
April 20th, will carry the report for the 
first quarter from each parish and mis- 
sion. We feel that it will be our duty 
to list separately all those in arrears. 



OUR COVER PICTURE 

Hard-pressed by the demands of Holy 
Week, a particularly heavy schedule of 
sick calls, preparing an Easter sermon 
and trying to get the kitchen garden 
ready for planting, the only explanation 
the editor can give of the cover is ; that 
it's pretty. It was only an act of super- 
human will-power which kept us from 
printing the Legend of the Dogwood. 



ASHEVILLE CHURCHES HAVE FULL 
LENTEN PROGRAMS 

According to the Asheville "Citizen", 
which is almost the sole source of infor- 
mation for The Highland Church- 
man's news from that remote part of the 
Diocese, the churches in Asheville had 
very full Lenten programs. All Souls, 
Biltmore, presented the Seven Last 
Words on Palm Sunday afternoon, St. 
Mary's, Redeemer, Trinity and St. 
Luke's Chunn's Cove, also .held many 
services, especially during Holy Week. 



What Is Stewardship ? 



AN APPEAL TO ALL RECTORS AND TREASURERS IN THE 
DIOCESE OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

The financial report for 1947 is given in detail in the February copy of The 
Highland Churchman and is a plain statement of our record for that year. Please 
peruse it carefully and then remember that "The light that shines farthest, shines 
brightest at home." How can we pay our missionaries their stipends each month 
unless you pay your part as it becomes due? May we hope that each Rector and 
Treasurer will realize the full measure of his responsibility and impress upon the 
people the real need for prompt payment of obligations to the Diocese. 

This is the period of the year when your Diocesan Treasury suffers most. 
Why? Do our people wait for the little children and our Sunday Schools to show 
them the way with the Lenten Offering? Some people seem to dwell under the 
impression that what they pay to the Church is in the nature of a gift. Others 
feel that what they pay is a legal and moral obligation. We give to the poor, but 
we must pay our debts, and these include the monthly payments of our pledge of 
$7,200.00 to the National Council for work in the Nation and in the World. Let 
us all strive a little harder, please. 

We sometimes wonder what our Treasurers throughout our Diocese think 
when they receive frequent reminders from their Diocesan Treasurer of their 
obligation— Does it ever occur to them that our stipends to clergy and other obli- 
gations are arranged upon a monthly basis, and must be so met? You would 
feel ashamed to belong to a church that did not pay the Rector's salary, and yet 
from the little attention given to the statements mailed out regularly, one would 
think that you did not care whether or not the church met her obligations. A review 
of our records shows that most of our people pay up regularly every month — this 
is as it should be. Some pay apparently just when it suits them, and some others, 
we are sorry to say, pay no more attention to our "Please Remit" requests than 
if they were no obligation whatever. Fortunately these are in a small minority. 
Let us make responsibility the key-note and let us realize our responsibility and 
impress upon our people the necessity of meeting our obligations promptly. In 
the present day challenge to our Church there must come also a new appreciation 
of our Stewardship and of our relation to these needs. As individuals, as members 
of the Community and the nation, as members of the Church, we have a definite 
relationship and responsibility from which there is only one escape and that is by 
meeting them fairly and fully. Stewardship is a much broader term than many 
of us have been accustomed to consider. It includes everything that we call ours; 
our ability to do things, our talents commonly called gifts, our health and strength, 
our time, our personality, our character and our material possessions expressed 
in terms of money. 

Consciously or unconsciously, we are judged by the way we discharge our 
stewardship, by the value we place upon the things we possess, not alone to our- 
selves but to others. This is a vital principle in daily life whether we acknowledge 
it or not, and from this there is no escape. Every privilege involves a respon- 
sibility, every gift an obligation. The time now is when we must reinterpret Stew- 
ardship in terms of world needs. 

William M. Redwood, Treasurer. 



About Bishops 



By The Rev. Gale Web be 

Naturally there has been, and will be, 
much discussion of "Bishops' 1 in our 
Diocese of late. Well, what about 
Bishops: Certainly this much, at least: 

Christ founded a Church, to extend 
the Incarnation and its benefits to all 
men in all ages — for example, in order 
that He could be in living touch with us 
some two thousand year after His physi- 
cal body was taken from the earth. In 
founding this Church He founded also 
a ministry, in the persons of His Apos- 
tles. "Go ye into all the world — and lo, 
I am with you.'' 

The Apostles, after the descent of the 
Holy Ghost upon them, went as they 
had been instructed. They taught with 
Christ's authority, admonished with His 
authority, ministered to souls with His 
authority. That is to say, the twelve 
Apostles were the Divinely commission- 
ed guardians of Christ's teaching, dis- 
cipline, and sacraments. 

But the Apostles died, each in his due 
time. Does that mean that Christ's 
authoritative teachings, discipline and 
sacraments perished from the earth 
when St. John, last of the Apostolic 
Band, yielded up the ghost: Hardly, 
else we must say that Christ was not 
very wise or far-seeing; that He took 
no care to see that His Church be ex- 
tended to all generations; that He loved 
people of the First Century more than 
He loves us. No, the facts are that the 
Apostles trained and commissioned oth- 
er, younger, men to carry on their 
authority in the succeeding generation. 
And these men in their turn passed on 
to others their authoritative steward- 
ship of the grace and truth that came 
by Jesus Christ. 

That is what Bishops are — successors 
of the Apostles. Holders of an office, 
an authority, a stewardship, a pastorate, 
that stems from Christ. 

From this fact of the "Apostolic Suc- 



cession" many truths follow. First, that 
the Bishop is the visible center of the 
Church's unity; living proof that our 
Episcopal Church is the one that Christ 
founded. This is a terribly important 
thing in our modern state of unChristian 
disunity when representative of more 
than 200 denominations claiming our al- 
legiance in the name of Christ. "Lo 
here!" "Lo there!" they cry. And we 
question — "Which is the true Church, 
among so many: In fact, is there a true 
Church : 

The Apostolic Succession — the Bishop 
— should settle the question. He is 
Christ's commissioned Apostle in our 
midst today. In New Testament times, 
if Sigmon Magus and Saint Andrew 
both claimed to be Christ's official stew- 
ard, it was easy to investigate the cre- 
dentials of both and discover whose 
claims were valid and whose were sim- 
ply "full of sound and fury, signifying 
nothing". And the point is that the 
choice is as easy today- — -St. Andrew's 
successor, the Bishop of the One Holy 
Catholic and Apostolic Church, is in our 
midst today. "None genuine without 
this signature". 

Second, if we want to know that our 
sacraments are true and valid — that 
"This is my Body"; that "thy sins are 
forgiven thee" — we find that assurance 
in the Apostolic Succession. In the ac- 
credited ministry that our Lord Himself 
created so that He would indeed be in 
touch with our souls in this generation 
as in all generations. 

In short, we Episcopalians are proud 
of our ancestry. Not in any backward- 
looking sense, but because our ancestry 
gives us spiritual assurance today and 
for the future. We do not grope in the 
dark for religious truth and comfort and 
help; we do not hope we have. We 
know we have it, and we can point to 
the Bishop as proof. 



Patterson School Camp 



As spring comes along and gets into 
your bones it is a reminder that pretty 
soon young people of the Diocese will 
be making their way to Happy Valley 
and the annual Diocesan Camp at Pat- 
terson School. Here's hoping you are 
one of the wise and lucky ones who come 
Sunday afternoon, June 6th. 

Plans are shaping up pretty well, al- 
though there are still several details to 
be worked out. The Rev. Ralph K. 
Webster, Rector of St. Francis", Ruth- 
erfordton, is to be the Chaplain. The 
Rev. C. G. Leavell, Rector of Grace 
Church, Morganton, is to be the Direc- 
tor. It is barely possible that Bishop 
Gribbin may be with us again; he writes 
that he will try to do so if he in within 
striking distance in June. Old-timers on 
the faculty will be the Rev. G. M. Jen- 
kins, Rector of Calvary, Fletcher, and 
Chairman of the Youth Commission; 
the Rev. W. C. Leach, Holy Cross, 
Valle Crucis; and the Rev. J. H. W. 



Rhys, of St. James', Black Mountain. 
A faculty addition is to be the Rev. Rob- 
ert B. Campbell, of Ascension, Hickory. 
Miss Patricia Page, of St. Andrew's, 
Bessemer City, and Miss Helen Thom- 
as, now of Trinity, Asheville, are to be 
with us as Counsellors. Among new- 
comers as Counsellors will be Mrs. Rob- 
ert B. Campbell, of Hickory, and Miss 
Aline Cronshey, of Edneyville. 

Courses of study will be three rather 
than four in the morning for each camp- 
er. Subjects offered will probably be 
"The Book of Common Prayer", "The 
Life of Christ", "Church Membership", 
"The Old Testament", and "Practical 
Problems of Young Peoples' Groups". 
The afternoon will be devoted very 
largely to recreation in the form of 
swimming, tennis, softball, hiking, base- 
ball, and perhaps a bit of dancing. 
After the Chaplain's half-hour there will 
be indoor recreation and a camp-fire or 
two before bedtime. Of course there 



APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION 

YOUNG CHURCHMAN'S CAMP 

Patterson School 

June 6th- 12th 

I hereby apply for registration in the Diocesan Young Churchman's 
Camp at Patterson School, June 6-12, 1948. I enclose $1.00 registration 
fee, and will bring an additional $6.00 to cover the entire cost. 
Check which: Boy ( ) Girl ( ) 

Name 

Age 

Address 

Parent's signature indicating consent 

(Or Guardian) 

Episcopal Minister's signature 

indicating recommendation 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

To The Clergy, Vestries, and Organized Mission Committees 
of the Diocese of Western North Carolina: 

By order of the Standing Committee the election of a Bishop will be 
the order of business for the Second Day of the Annual Diocesan Conven- 
tion to be held in Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C„ May 13 and 14, 1948. 

The opening service will be held in Trinity Church at 10:30 A. M., on 
THURSDAY, May 13. The regular order of business for the Annual 
Convention will follow immediately. 

The election of a Bishop will be held in Trinity Church on the Second 
Day, Friday, May 14. 

Please note as follows: 

1. All parishes that have paid their assessment for 1947 are entitled 
to three lay delegates. 

All Organized Missions that have paid their assessment for 1947 
are entitled to one lay delegate. 

Lay delegates must be communicants of the Parish or Mission that 
they represent. Parish vestries elect their delegates. Mission com- 
mittees elect theirs. 

Delegates should be elected ten days before Convention. 

The certificate should be properly filled in, signed, and sent to the 
Secretary of the Convention at least Five Days before the meeting 
of the Convention. 

The election of a Bishop shall be by orders. 



2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 



6. 



Respectfully, 

JAMES P. BURKE, Secretary 
766 North Main Street 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



are to be three meals each day for every- 
one who takes turns at washing dishes 
and waiting tables; others will slowly 
starve! 

The dates are June 6th-12th. Before 
May 15th nobody but Episcopalians 
between the ages of 13 and 24 will be 
accepted as registering; after that date 
we will open any vacancies that may 
exist to young people between the ages 
of 13 and 24 who are not members of 
the Episcopal Church. 

Send in your registration for Diocesan 
Camp today; mail to this year's Direc- 



tor, The Rev. C. G. Leavell, 301 S. King 
St., Morganton, N. C. In order that 
everybody may come either at the fami- 
ly's expense or on a scholarship gotten 
up by the local congregation, the cost is 
still only $7.00 for the entire time. Camp 
will break up after breakfast Saturday, 
June 12th. 



The finally-adjusted budget of the 
National Council for 1948, adopted at 
the last Council meeting, is in the 
amount of $3,449,248. 



Young Churchmen's News 



The Youth Commission of the Diocese 
met in Morganton on Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 14, at 3 P. M. The Rev. C. G. 
Leavell was host to the members, who 
met at his new home. Suggestions for 
a director of the camp were made, and 
The Rev. Robert Campbell, Hickory, 
N. C, was elected. He had to refuse, 
however, as he is to be at Kanuga this 
summer to teach a class. The Rev. 
Charles G. Leavell was unanimously 
elected to serve in this capacity, with 
the Rev. Mark Jenkins, Fletcher, as the 
Vice-Director. Other officials will be 
appointed by the director, and will be 
announced later. Courses of study were 
also discussed, and several very good 
classes will be taught by the clergy. The 



age limit for attendance to Patterson is 
13-24, and any boy or girl who is a 
member of the Episcopal Church in the 
Diocese of Western North Carolina is 
urged to attend. This will be the fifth 
year camp has been held at Patterson 
School, in Happy Valley. We are 
anxious that this Diocese should equal 
the other Dioceses in its camp program, 
and the only way that we can succeed 
in our attempt is to have a large attend- 
ance of campers, who enjoy themselves. 
We can guarantee that you will enjoy 
being at camp, and we hope that you 
will take the opportunity to attend the 
camp this year. We will be looking 
forward to having you with us from 
June 6 to June 12. 



Letters To The Editor 

In our journalistic infancy, we may 
not know how happy we are and we may 
be asking for trouble, but The High- 
land Churchman would welcome let- 
ters from its vast reading public. The 
silence which greets each issue might 
be interpreted as the ominous one which 
precedes a storm which will lead to a 
new editorial staff, or it may be the 
silence that gives assent. In any case, 
any paper is better for the editor being 
able to judge to some degree the temper 
of its readers. 

In the future, space will be given to 
letters received before the 20th of each 
publication month. Limitations of space 
may lead to omissions or deletions, but 
we shall try to be fair in presenting all 
pros and cons. Letters should not ex- 
ceed two hundred words and must be 
signed by the writer. 

We hope many will enter the open 
forum. 



Mr. Morgan Writes Reply 
To Mr. Cox 

The February issue of "The North 
Carolina Churchman" carried a letter 
to the Rev. James S. Cox from the Rev. 
A. Rufus Morgan concerning the matter 
of realignment of the dioceses. Mr. Cox 
had suggested a division that would pro- 
vide for only two dioceses, each with a 
bishop coadjutor, a plan which Mr. Mor- 
gan regards as unworkable. He writes: 

"We need to regain more of the ideal 
of a Bishop as Chief Pastor for the 
whole diocese. Therefore we need small- 
er dioceses instead of larger. I realize 
this runs counter to the prevailing Epis- 
copal conception of the grandeur which 
should surround the Episcopal office. 
However, we can profitably dispense 
with much of that." 

Mr. Morgan's letter goes on to sug^ 
gest that a division which would make 
the three dioceses equal in size presents 
a possibility which might well be con- 
sidered. 



DIOCESAN NEWS 



The Rev. George C. Ashton has re- 
signed as Priest-in-Charge of St. 
Gabriel's, Rutherfordton, and St. An- 
drew's, Green River, to accept a call to 
work in Oklahoma City. 

The Rector of St. Francis', Ruther- 
fordton, has accepted temporary charge 
of St. Gabriel's and St. Andrew's, and 
is planning to conduct regular services 
in each mission twice a month. Lay 
leaders are to conduct Church School 
in both missions. 



The young married couples organi- 
zation in St. Francis', Rutherfordton, 
is a "going concern" which might well 
be emulated by other parishes. From 
the March 7th issue of "The Parish 
News" comes the following: 

"The Lenten meeting of the St. Fran- 
cis League was held at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. B. .H. Sumner Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 24th. Brief biographical sketches 
and reflections on prayer from the writ- 
ings of St. Augustine, St. John Chrysos- 
tOm, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, and St. 
Francis de Sales were read by the Rec- 
tor. Refreshments were served to the 
five couples present by the hostess at 
the close of the meeting." 



CLERGY, LAY DELEGATES TO 

DIOCESAN CONVENTION 

MAY 13th- 14th 

By action of the Standing Committee 
at its meeting April 1st, the place of the 
Annual Diocesan Convention was chang- 
ed to Trinity Church, Asheville. This 
change was made necessary when it be- 
came apparent that the forthcoming 
Convention would be so well attended 
that facilities in Morganton would be 
too severely over-taxed. The original 
notice sent out by the Secretary of the 
Diocese, the Rev. J. P. Burke, stated 
that the Convention would meet in Mor- 
ganton on May 13th. Mr. Burke has 
sent second notices to all parishes and 



missions calling attention to the action 
of the Standing Committee in changing 
the place but not the date. 

It was with great regret that the rec- 
tor and congregation of Grace Church 
agreed to the change in the place of con- 
vention, for they had looked forward 
to welcoming the Diocese. It should be 
emphasized that there was no lack of 
willingness on the part of Grace Church 
to accommodate the Convention; there 
is only regret that the number of over- 
night accommodations and eating places 
is too limited to care for the large num- 
ber of delegates and visitors who are 
expected to attend the Convention. 



St. Philips's Brevard 

The Rev. Harry Perry, rector, has 
announced his resignation which will 
take effect the last of June. Following 
his retirement, Father and Mrs. Perry 
will take up residence in Florida. 



Calvary Church, Fletcher 

Through a generous gift, the parish 
has been able to order a new 16mm 
sound projector with an extra speaker. 
A strip projector has been in use for 
some time each Sunday morning. The 
attendance in the Sunday School has in- 
creased to the point where there is no 
longer room in the old parish house. 



Transfiguration, Bat Cave 

Fr. F. A. Saylor has retired and will 
leave Bat Cave April 1st. Until a new 
priest is appointed, services will be con- 
ducted by the Rev. Mark Jenkins. 



St. James, Hendersonville 

The annual Parish Dinenr meeting 
was held at the Bowen Hotel. The spirit 
of progress and harmony was quite evi- 
dent. It was the vestry's decision to 
make 1948 a Church Building Year. 
Mention was made of Mrs. Helen Nich- 
ol's bequest to the New Church Building 
Fund, amounting to about three thous- 
and dollars. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



By Elizabeth Van Noppen 

The Executive Board of the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the Diocese met in Lenoir 
on March 16th. Despite the pouring 
rain. 19 members were present for the 
celebration of the Holy Communion, 
the Rev. Boston Lackey, celebrant, and 
for the enthusiastic meeting which fol- 
lowed. Mrs. Roger Winborne and Mrs. 
W. G. Byerly entertained the Board at 
luncheon at the home of the former, 
where the afternoon session was held. 

Enthusiasm ran high over the plans 
for the District Meetings (which will 
have met before this issue reaches you), 
for the Annual Meeting at Kanuga, and 
for the Summer Conference at Yalle 
Crucis. 



of real enlightenment and spiritual en- 
richment. 

Miss Fletcher has already obtained 
Mrs. E. G. Peoples, of Oxford, as one 
of the principal teachers and lecturers. 
Mrs. Peoples is past president of the 
Auxiliary of the Diocese of North Caro- 
lina, and is a very able teacher. 



The Advance Work Offering for 1947 
amounted to $616.72. 



Nobody at Trinity Church. Asheville, 
can remember when the attendance at 
the Lenten Study Classes was so large 
as it is this year. The rector, the Rev. 
Mr. Tuton, is the teacher, and leader of 
the discussion which follows. 



The Annual Meeting will be held on 
June 3rd and 4th, opening at 2 o'clock 
on the 3rd, and closing at noon on the 
4th. Miss Fletcher, our Diocesan presi- 
dent, with a committee composed of 
Mrs. E. L. Kemper and Mrs. Mark 
Dickerson, are busy working out plans 
to make this the best Annual Meeting 
ever, and information regarding the 
speakers should be ready for the next 
issue of The Highland Churchman. 
One of the features is to have respon- 
sible high school girls from the parishes 
near Kanuga to care for the young 
children whom mothers may wish to 
bring. 



The Summer Conference will be held 
at Valle Crucis on August 22nd to 27th. 
This conference, as you recall, is to be 
a conference for the churchwomen of 
our Diocese, and it is hoped and expect- 
ed that this five day period will be one 



The Auxiliary of St. James, Lanoir, 
decided that it couldn't meet every day 
for prayer, but that it did want and 
need unified praying. Lenoir has a fire 
siren that can be heard for miles around, 
and this siren blows every day at twelve 
o'clock. The sound of the siren is the 
reminder to the church women in their 
homes, that it is time for prayers — for 
guidance in the selection of a Bishop, 
for better world conditions, or for any- 
thing designated for that period. The 
president reports a large number of 
women participating. 



STRANGE COMPANY 

The Southwestern Episcopalian prints 
the following list of Lenten Sermon 
topics: 

Feb. 15 — Satan Unmasked. 
Feb. 22 — Satan's Brood. 
Feb. 29 — Presiding Bishop. 
Mar. 7 — Where Satan Hides. 
Mar. 14 — Satan Vanquished. 



Presiding Bishop's Appeal 
Successful 

New York, N. Y. — The nationwide 
radio appeal for world relief made by 
the Rt. Rev. Henry Knox Sherrill, Pre- 
siding Bishop of the Episcopal Church 
on February 29, has met with unquali- 
fied success. Bishop Sherrill issued the 
following statement late yesterday: 

"With deep gratitude to hundreds of 
thousands of donors, we have now pass- 
ed the minimum goal of $1,000,000. 
However, it should be borne in mind 
tha tthe need is so great that every ad- 
ditional gift will bring relief to many 
sufferers throughout the world." 

Bishop Sherrill's radio address was 
carried into thousands of Episcopal 
churches as a part of their Sunday 
morning service. It told of needs over- 
seas, both in Europe and the Orient, and 
urged members of the Episcopal Church 
to respond to the appeal, which was for 
a million dollars; this in addition to a 
million dollars given for the same cause 
in 1947. It was the first time in «the 
history of broadcasting that such a mes- 
sage was taken, on a country-wide scale, 
directly into practically all the church 
of any religious group. 



Mrs. 



Resolution 
Charles H. Cowles 



BALTIMORE PRIEST LENTEN 
PREACHER IN ASHEVILLE 

The Rev. Kenneth Gearhart, rector of 
St. John's Church, Baltimore, was the 
preacher at the noon-day Lenten ser- 
vices held during Holy Week. This 
series of services was sponsored by the 
Church Street Churchmen, representing 
the Episcopal, Methodist and Presby- 
terian churches. Mr. Gearhart spoke to 
audiences which met in the Imperial 
Theatre in Asheville. 



Does Your Church Giving Reflect 
God's Goodness to You, Or Your 
Thoughtlessness Of Others? 



WHEREAS our Heavenly Father has 
seen fit to call to His Kingdom our be- 
loved fellow member, Louise Lunn 
Cowles, past President of the Women's 
Auxiliary of St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
of Wilkesboro, 

Bt It Resolved that we bow to His 
Holy Will in humble submission; that 
we deeply regret the loss of this leader 
from whose association our sense of fel- 
lowship has been strengthened; that we 
keep fresh our halo of delightful memo- 
ries of our friend and co-worker by 
redoubling our efforts to carry on the 
work of our Auxiliary to which she gave 
such faithful service so cheerfully and 
efficiently; and that we hereby testify 
to her beautiful Christian character as 
evidenced by her true devotion and 
fidelity to duty; 

Be It Further Resolved that we ex- 
tend to her bereaved family our deepest 
sympathy; that these resolutions be- 
come a record of the minutes of the 
Woman's Auxiliary; published in the 
local paper and The Highland 
Churchman and a copy sent to the 
family. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Frances H. Underwood 
Blanche P. Hill 
Hallie L. Forester 
Rose W. S. Harvel 

Auxiliary Officers and 
Resolutions Committee 



WAYNESVILLE RECTOR RESIGNS 

The Rev. Robert G. Tatum, rector of 
Grace Church, W'aynesville, has resign- 
ed and his resignation has been accepted 
by the vestry. Mr. Tatum came to 
Waynesville in August, 1943, but for the 
past two years has been in ill health. 
He is a graduate of Sewanee, a veteran 
of the first World War, and a former 
missionary in Alaska. 



10 



Proposed Budget 1949 



The Department of Finance presented the following tentative proposed 
Budget for 1949 which was accepted by the Executive Council at its last 
meeting. This will form the basis for the Budget which must be passed 
by the Diocesan Convention in May. 

DIOCESAN EXPENSE FUND 
ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

Endowment Fund $ 2,000.00 

Ravenscroft Fund 1.500.00 

Parishes and Missions— 11% 8.720.00 

$12,220.00 
EXPENSES 

Bishop Salary and Pension Premium $ 6.700.00 

Bishop Travel and Office Expense 2.000.00 

Replacement Bishop's Car 200.00 

Delegates 1949 Convention 300.00 

Repairs Shoenberger Hall 100.00 

Salary Treasurer's Bookkeeper 60.00 

Expense of Committees 25.00 

General Convention Expense 300.00 

Printing Journal 410.00 

Dues Province of Sewanee 385.00 

Miscellaneous 150.00 

Audit Treasurer's Books 50.00 

Christian Education 100.00 

Social Relations 25.00 

Promotion and Publicity 700.00 

Missions and Extension of the Church 150.00 

Youth Commission 100.00 

Salary Secretary of Diocese 150.00 

$11,910.00 
GENERAL CHURCH AND MISSION FUND 
ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

From National Council $ 3.250.00 

From Income Holt Fund 2.000.00 

From Woman's Auxiliary 125.00 

From Parishes and Missions — 2l c /c 16.674.00 

$22,049.00 

EXPENSES 

Missionarv Stipends 

St. James. Black Mountain $1,100.00 

St. Philips. Brevard 512.00 

St. Lukes. Boone 2.070.00 

St. Andrews, Canton 600.00 

Redeemer, Craggy 800.00 

St. Lukes. Lincolnton 600.00 

St. Gabriels. Rutherfordton 880.00 

Patterson School 300.00 

Redeemer. Shelbv 920.00 

Holy Cross, Valle Crucis , 1.340.00 

Grace, Waynesville 491.00 

Reserve 1.387.00 $11,000.00 

Pension Premiums $ 1.100.00 

Appalachian School 200.00 

Kanuga Association 100.00 

Chapel Hill 250.00 

Patterson School 200.00 

St. Mary's School. Raleigh 200.00' 

Negro Work J 1.000.00 

Archdeacon Kennedy Travel 150.00 

General Church Program 7,500.00 

TOTAL $21,700.00 



SEWANEE REGENTS EXTEND CALL 
FOR PEACE ACTION 

At a special meeting of the Board of 
Regents of the University of the South 
Thursday evening, April 1, and Friday 
morning, April 2, the Regents discussed 
at length the international crisis and the 
threat of war and passed the following 
resolution which was telegraphed to the 
Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal 
Church and subsequently released to the 
press. The full text is as follows: 

"We, the Board of Regents of the 
University of the South at Sewanee, pro- 
test the feeling throughout the country 
of the inevitability of war. 

We hold and proclaim that America 
must take the lead in stopping the spread 
of Communism, in preserving individual 
freedom and personal liberty, and in up- 
holding the dignity of man. We must 
hope and strive to the utmost to accom- 
plis hthis without recourse to war, and 
we must have faith that this can be done. 

We must put our hearts and minds to 
the urgent task of studying the facts, 
finding a plan, and following a course 
that will attain these ends. We call uor- 
selves, our faculty, and students to this 
high objective. 



Visit the CHURCH BOOKSTORE 

At KANUGA CONFERENCES 

June 1st to September 1st 

Religious Books Ecclesiastical Arts 

Church School Supplies 

Owned and Operated by 

Kanuga Conference, Hendersonville, N. C. 



EFIRD'S 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
WITH PRICE 



Patton Ave. 



Asheville 



WHEN IN ASHEVILLE 
SHOP AT 

SEARS 

'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your 
Money Back" 



For ourselves, we regard the following 
as fundamental: 

1. Acceptance by the United States 
of responsibility for leadership in world 
affairs. 

2. A clearly defined foreign policy for 
the United States. 

3. A strong Army, Navy, and Air 
Force. 

4. A declaration of our deep desire 
for peace, but also of our determination 
to fight if necessary for the preservation 
of liberty and justice. 

5. Economic aid to the non-Com- 
munist European countries as provided 
in the Marshall Plan. 

6. A World Federation of Nations 
really capable of settling international 
disputes, stopping war and aggression, 
and preserving peace. 

We reaffirm our belief in the redemp- 
tive power of the Christian faith and we 
pray that we may know and do God's 
will. 

(Signed) 

Frank Gillespie, Chairman 

San Antonio, Texas . 

Rt. Rev. Frank A. Juhan, D. D. 

Bishop of Florida, and Chancellor. 

Rt. Rev. R. Bland Mitchell 

Bishop of Arkansas. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas N. Carruthers 

Bishop of South Carolina. 

Rt. Rev. John Long Jackson 

Bishop of Louisiana. 

Very Rev. John B. Walthour, Dean 

St. Phillips Cathedral, Atlanta. 

Rev. Girault M. Jones, Secretary 

New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Dr. Alexander Guerry, Vice-Chancellor 

and President of the University. 

J. Albert Woods, Alumni President 

Jacksonville, Florida. 

W. Dudley Gale, Regent 

Nashville, Tennessee. 

Dr. James T. MacKenzie, Regent 

Birmingham, Alabama. 

J. A. Setze, Regent 

Augusta, Georgia. 

Edmund Orgill, Regent 

Memphis, Tennessee. 



12 



How Is Your Parish Doing? 

New York, N. Y. — A higher propor- 
tion of parish income goes towards the 
rector's stipend in the case of smaller 
parishes than true of larger parishes. 
This fact is brought out in a little study 
just published by The Church Pension 
Fund, 2 OExchange Place, New York 
City, in its April, 1948, issue of "Pro- 
tection Points". 

Parishes with annual income of $3,000 
to $3,500 pay out about 57% of this as 
stipend to their rectors, on the average. 
Parishes with $25,00 to $30,000 income 
apply about 20% as stipend. 

Graphs are given in the leaflet relat- 
ing the size of parishes and missions to 
the stipends they pay. The size is meas- 
ured by two yardsticks, namely the 
number of communicants and the an- 
nual income. Data for 1,966 congrega- 
tions were used, ranging in size up to 
communicant groups of 1,500 people 
and up to annual income of $40,000. 
Only congregations served by one cler- 
gyman were studied. The sample was 
considered a definitive one for the pur- 
pose. 

The Pension Fund in 1947 published 
a fairly complete study of the ecclesias- 
tical income (salaries) of clergymen. 
This new study focuses on the congre- 
gation as a unit, and what it applies as 
stipend, rather than on the clergyman 
and what his total stipend, often from 
several different sources, may be. 

Compensation of $3,500 a year, in- 
cluding rectory rental allowance of one- 
sixth of the cash salary, is typical of 
what parishes with 300 to 400 commu- 
nicants and parishes with $7,500 to 
$10,000 annual income pay their rectors, 
according to the report. The earlier 
study brought out that the average sti- 
pend of the whole group of active clergy 
runs about $3,450 a year. 



We look to the seminaries for 
future priests; they look to us for 
support. 



The Advance, of Chicago, reports a 
peculiar incident. Under the heading, 
Sermon Goes Astray, it reports the fol- 
lowing: "Through some 'ethereal phe- 
nomena' a sermon being delivered by 
the Rev. Harold L. Hutton in St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, Pawtucket, R. I., 
emerged loud and clear over the ampli- 
fying system in nearby St. Mary's Rom- 
an Catholic Church.' 



B. M. LACKEY, JR., RESIGNS 

It has been announced that the Rev. 
B. M. Lackey, Jr., priest in charge of 
Church of the Redeemer, Shelby, has 
resigned effective May 31st. He is to 
assume charge of a church in Ashboro, 
X. C, in June. Mr. Lackey has been 
in Shelby for the past two years, and 
besides the work there, has also been 
priest in charge of the mission in Bes- 
semer Citv. 



BELK'S 

Remember, You Always Save 
at Belk's 



J STUDIOS 01 ' 
flGGORGGL.PAYDG 

'PA. 245IJR(WDWAY-l , ATCR?OU 0..I. 

r) I a rnuiM)ei)>id<)G a 

A \ CHURCH mCfllORIALS 

J STAIDGD GLASS-WOOD'fllCTAL 
ALL CHURCH CRAFTS 



ST. PAUL'S 
POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

LAWRENCEVTLLE. VIRGINIA 
FOUNDED 1888 
Co-Education — Grants the B. S. degree 
in the following fields: Business Ad- 
ministration, Elementary Teacher Train- 
ing, Home Economics, Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Beautiful Campus of 75 Acres. St. 
Paul's is the largest of The American 
Church Institute Schools — Present enroll- 
ment 1244. For further information, 
please address — 

The President, Dr. J. Alvin Russell 



13 



THE COUNT SCHOOL 

287 PEARSON DRIVE 
ASHEVILLE. N. C. 
Boys (12-19 years). Boarding and Day 
Departments. College preparation. In- 
dividual instruction. Boys taught how 
to study. Outdoor sports. Summer 
School (June 20-Sept. 7). Parents are in- 
vited to confer, write the Headmaster by 
appointment. (Tel. 9208). 

Willis Garrett Conant 
Headmaster 




Question Box 

By The Rev. J. P. Burke 



Is our Church opposed to cremation? 

I know of no pronouncement that our 
Church has made against cremation. 
Dr. Moss in his "Dogmatic Theology" 
(Anglican) says: "Christian sentiment 
is opposed to cremation, but not Chris- 
tion principle; we do not believe, as the 
ancient Egyptians did, that the fate of 
the spirit depends on what happens to 
the body, or that a body which is burn- 
ed, or eaten by wild beasts, will not rise 
again. But such pagan practices as 
'scattering the ashes' are entirely con- 
trary to the Christian spirit of reverence 
for that which has been, and in some 
way unknown to us will be again, the 
temple of the Holy Ghost." 



What did the Palm Sunday crowd 
mean by the ivord "Hosanna"? 



Samuel J. FISHER Company 

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Telephone 4668 

Haywood, Adjoining Auditorium 

Asheville, N. C. 



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Esso Oil Burners 

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The Christian interpretation of the 
word "Hosanna" as used by St. Luke 
is "glory in the highest". It is an 
ascription of praise. It is not unlikely 
that the Jews used it in the sense of 
"save us", or, "Salvation from God", or, 
"be propitious". 



Did Jesus divide people into good 
people and bad people? 

Strictly speaking, no. He divided 
people into believers and unbelievers; 
into those who trusted him and those 
who did not. Those who trusted him 
would be as the book of Acts puts it 
"those who are being saved." He did 
not speak of the saved and the unsaved. 
The believers were people of the "Way"; 
people who had seen the vision of life 
in Him and opened their hearts to his 
teaching and the redemptive power of 
God. 



14 



"Full Many A Gem...." 

Within the space of a few days, Holy 
Cross Mission, Valle Crucis, lost two of 
its oldest members in the deaths of Mrs. 
Julia Tester and Mr. Roah Mitchell. 

Mrs. Tester, who was 83 at the time 
of her death, was a member for over 
forty years at St. Anthony's, Dutch 
Creek, which is a preaching station of 
the Mission. She was buried from Holy 
Cross Church on Sunday, April 2nd. 

Mr. Mitchell was 73 when he died, 
having been a member of Holy Cross for 
most of his life. He was one of the few 
surviving members who remembered the 
Rev. Milnor Jones who was sent by 
Bishop Cheshire to re-open the mission 
work at Valle Crucis in 1895. Mr. Mit- 
chell was a craftsman who with a few 
simple tools could turn out anything 
from wooden buttons to hickory split 
chairs. Funeral services were held for 
Mr. Mitchell on Wednesday, April 7th. 

"Miy the souls of the faithful departed 
rest hi peace; and light perpetual shine 
upon them." 



Compliments 

- 
of 



Asheville 

Mica 
Company 

Biltmore, N. C. 




TALMAN 
OFFICE SUPPLIES INC. 

8 College St., Asheville 
CALL 2105 




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The Rrttersofi School 



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Episcopal School in Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains of Western North Carolina. 
Accredited. Grades 7-12. Spiritual 
training emphasized. Self-help plan. 

George F. v/iese, Supt. 
COLLEGE Legerwood TYPING 
PREPARATORY N. C. FORESTRY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS AGRICULTURE 



Tha Payne-Spiers Studios, Inc. 

Paterson, New Jersey 

Stained Glass Windows 
Chancel Furnishings 

Memorials in Wood, Marble, Iron, 
Mosaics, Altar Furnishings 
DESIGNS SUBMITTED 



IS 



NORTH CAROLINA RELIEF DRIVE 

Last week, the report from the Church 
World Service Center at New Windsor, 
Md., stated that more than 350,000 
pounds of relief materials had been giv- 
en, to date, in the N. C. "Fill a Ship 
with Friendship" relief drive. Materials, 
the statement added, had been of unus- 
ually high quality and well packed. 



SAINT MARK'S. GASTONIA. N. C. 

Holy Communion 8:00 A. M. Each Sunday 

(Except First) 

Morning Service and Sermon 11:00 A. M. 

Church School and Adult Bible Class 9:45 A. M. 

Holy Communion 10:30 A. M. Each Thursday 

William C. Cravner, Rector 



Year in and Year out Our Insurance 
Policies Stand on Guard to Protect You 

JOHN E. SCHLEY 

General Insurance 

Asheville, N. C. 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 

JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Founded 1842 
Richard G. Stone, President 

An Zpiscopal School for Girls owned by the 
five Diocese of North and South Carolina. 

11th, 12th grades of High School and two 
years college work. All academic courses fully 
accredited by Southern Association. 

Religious Education — Art — Expression — Home 
Economics — Music. 20 acre campus — Gymnasium 
— indoor pool — tennis courts. 

Catalogue and Book of Views furnished upon 
request. 




BEACON BLANKETS 
MAKE WARM FRIENDS 



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